#1
When composing do you think that you should do the drums as well? Or just leave it to someone else because they have a much larger vocabulary of feeling and knowledge of putting together drum parts.

I am just a guitar player and I am able to put to put together guitar and bass parts to my liking, but I find that drums are too tedious to deal with. However if I leave it to someone else it feels like it it isn't 100 percent my work and not 100 percent originally me.
#2
I usually write some drum parts to give an idea to the drummer what I'm after. But of course I let the drummer play stuff he wants to play if it supports the song. And if he has some ideas to improve the song, of course I listen to him.

And who cares if it's not 100% your song? In a band you shouldn't care about it. It's your band's song even if you are the writer.

Also drum writing the drum part isn't really part of songwriting. What I mean by this is if your drummer writes his drum part, he's not a writer of your song and you don't need to give him any credit. Same with guitar solos and bass line (if it's not a melody that really stands out).

The thing is, your band will make the song sound different even if you don't change any parts because everybody has a bit different playing style. I also like it when people make songs I write sound better. I don't care that much about who the main songwriter is. I really like writing with my friend.

If you don't play in a band and are a solo artist, just tell the drummer what you are after and make him play it. Drums are usually a bit more free to improvise than other instruments.
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Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Jun 17, 2013,
#3
Quote by Unreal T
However if I leave it to someone else it feels like it it isn't 100 percent my work and not 100 percent originally me.


So, just to be clear, it's more important that it be 100% you rather than it be as good as it can be?
#4
When I write new song's or riffs I always have an idea in my head on how I would like the drums to sound. When I approach my drummer, what he comes up with may or may not be what I am hearing in my head. We collaborate from there until we are satisfied the riff with percussion is perfect. Sometimes he automatically plays something different than what I was thinking and its 1000% better, sometimes not. Just to be clear, it is the one who comes up with the melody/rhythm of the song, who is the songwriter. Unless you want to split composing credits.
#5
You should have an idea of what the drums should be and maybe be able to vocalize something for them to get the idea.
Many times what you are hearing in your head is something they've practiced before or something they can adapt into what they are feeling.
If they are a skilled drummer, they will fit whatever you ask them to do. you have have to be able to ask and give them the proper direction.

Me (bass player) and this drummer work a lot with a sax player who doesn't know squat about rhythm section stuff but does a lot of arranging. He just does his melody and chord thing and then sort of sings/beatboxes what he wants to hear and we make it up from there.
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Last edited by King Of Suede at Jun 17, 2013,
#6
it depends on your style of music, but the drums are usually the first thing to be recorded and they're often the "framework" of a piece. as such, i try and get at least an outline of how the drums will work while i'm writing and let the player add their own touch.

of course that's just a guideline, when you're working with simpler beats like in rock or pop music, you can often get by with good synergy and communication during rehearsal. the more complex, the more foresight you'll probably need for a cohesive rhythm section to shine through
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#8
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Do you credit the guys who wrote the computer software you use?


do you credit the guys who design the amps and cabs you use?

i don't see the relevance to this here
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#9
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do you credit the guys who design the amps and cabs you use?

i don't see the relevance to this here


The relevance is that nothing is ever 100% your work. Did you kill and skin that goat to make your own drum? Of course not. This thread is stupid.
#10
Quote by innovine
The relevance is that nothing is ever 100% your work. Did you kill and skin that goat to make your own drum? Of course not. This thread is stupid.


you can manipulate those tools at your leisure. you can't do that with a person. very poor analogy.
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#11
It very much depends on the drummer. Some drummers I've worked with are like very good drum machines - they can't come up with anything themselves (at least, not particularly good) but they'll recreate anything I give to them. Others have more of a creative flare. In that case, I get an idea for what I want the drums to do, and let them work off of that. The most important aspect of the drum beat (for my purposes) is the kick drum. Being a bassist, I need to know that what the kick drum is playing is coherent with what I'm playing so even when a drummer is writing his own parts, I'll make sure we slow it down and listen carefully to make sure that all the kick hits are placed where they feel right.
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