#1
How to get the most out of your recording session? Any tips? WE have a couple days booked at a nice local (not home) studio. Also some questions. We are a indie/alternative band.

How do you get your singer singing the best that day? And how can the singer practice his parts to the most efficient way to be prepared?

Live vs multi track recording?

Any tips for tones and how to decide which fits the song?

Should you always overdub and pan guitars on songs or just on chorus for more pop?(or maybe even more overdubs on the chorus)
#2
Follow the good old scout motto "Be Prepared". My band tracked 7 songs in 12 hours doing double tracked guitar, bass, drums, vocals, and some solo guitar overdubs. We could do that because before we went in we could play everything dead on the beat every time. You should be individually practicing to a metronome every day until you can start, turn off the metronome while you're still playing (or get someone to do it for you), and turn it on near the end and not have missed a beat. If you can do that, you're fairly close to being able to record.
Make sure everyone has fresh or clean strings (some bassists will just clean them because bass strings are expensive and that's fine). Make sure your drummer has tuned his damn drums, it's one of those things that gets overlooked first time and doing it makes everything that much better.
Don't do a big band practice the day before or anything that will strain their voice. Water is also good. Although the singer should probably know how they get the best out of their voice.
If you need everything done quickly (and therefor cheaply) then Live is probably the way to go. If you want the best sound and have a bit more time, then multitrack is definitely better.
You should already know how you want the song to sound and the tone you want, if you don't then cancel your session, you're not ready.
I like full double tracked guitars personally, but that will depend on the song and the sound you're going for.
#3
Quote by hahaha15
How to get the most out of your recording session? Any tips? WE have a couple days booked at a nice local (not home) studio. Also some questions. We are a indie/alternative band.
Cool, if your drums are simple enough they can likely be 100% organic/real - if your drummer is good and his kit is quality!

How do you get your singer singing the best that day? And how can the singer practice his parts to the most efficient way to be prepared?
To be honest, every vocalist is different and some are incredibly successful with methods that just ruin other vocalists. As far as efficiency, a low-end recording of his vocals a-capella to some scratch tracks of yours (which you should have for him to practice to in the first place) will be a great reference for him. As with anything goes, if the vocalist can sound solid and consistent with an incredibly simple/unprocessed recording setup then they can really shine in a properly professional recording environment.
Also, keep in mind that the environment will influence any vocalist. I strongly suggest you do something to bring out the emotions which you are trying to reflect in the music. The vocalist will be the most evident display of this, and it is far overlooked and backburnered with more concerns given to perfection of takes.

Live vs multi track recording?
Totally up to you and the recording studio. If you can all be in the same room playing your music with your drummer, but your amps are in a completely isolated room and won't bleed into his mics then this approach is great! However, this will take a very well planned out setup session and can take a lot longer than you think - depending how complicated your bands setup is (how many members, how big of a drum kit, is the vocalist playing guitar as well, are there backing vocals, is the music overly complicated even for you to perform, etc.)

Any tips for tones and how to decide which fits the song?
Find a duress with how you perform each song with the sound you have found with your gear. Use the ****ing tone knobs on your guitar, and the pickup switching, and playing with your fingers and different picks and move with your music. Portray your music with your playing, the tone will be influenced by that as we all know far too well. The tone is in your hands! However, a shit amp and a shit guitar with shit everything will **** up your success with attempting to attain these things. This is something I strongly suggest you do not plan to figure out in the studio, but crucially discover in the time before entering to record.

Should you always overdub and pan guitars on songs or just on chorus for more pop?(or maybe even more overdubs on the chorus)

I believe that layering is incredibly special for bringing things up, not always so much overdubbing or quad tracking parts with the same lines. This is part dependant though. Subtleties are a greater influence than any attempt to make things "punch" more by adding more punchy things. Simple synth pads, samples, noises, ambience, very low in the mix with the intent to fit the mood will hit the listeners subconscious like a back of bricks. Experiment.
#4
record your straight Guitar signal AND your mic'ed amps signal IF your engineer knows about the method it'sonly a extra track but give you the options to rerecord your amp tone if your not happy and you do not have to preform

and a minor plus you can check you amp sim options if needed ( tho real amps are best )
#5
I always direct people to this section of my studio site.

http://greenroomrecording.now-here-this.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=19&Itemid=20

There are a few links underneath that section that pertain to specific instruments.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.