#1
Hello I'm not sure if this is the right place to post this, but ill take a shot considering its the Jazz/Blues forum..

I'm fairly new to jazz playing, but i have done quite a bit of theory before this, and I thought it would be a good idea to try learn some jazz standards, and went with one of my favourites, Autumn leaves..

I've always played the song in the Key of G, but the other day I came across a video of Stanley Jordan playing it.

[forbidden link] - very cool use of 2 guitars

However, I took the melody as I know it (VI,VII, I, IV - for the first group of notes) up to higher octave like he plays it, but it didn't sound right, and when I tried to transcribe it, it found that it was obviously the same interval of notes, but a half tone higher, in the key of Ab..

So my question is, is he just playing it in a different key to what its usually played in, are am I just missing something?

And also, I have a shaking feeling my ears might be deceiving me, cause I've only recently stopped using tabs, and started using my ears, and I might be wrong about the whole thing..

Thanks in advance
#3
First of all, the key of that tune is E minor, not G major.

FrauVfromPoB is exactly right. It's probably just being played in a different key, but people do sometimes change the pitch on YouTube so as not to get sued.
#5
Quote by Fallenoath
E minor's relative scale is G Major, so its pretty much the same thing though.

It's not the same at all. E minor is built from the same basic set of notes as G major, but the tonal center is E, not G. That alone is a HUGE difference. Also, minor keys have a different (similar, but not the same) set of "rules" from major keys. One example in this tune would be the fact that many people play E-6 as the tonic chord instead of E- or E-7. If this was G major, this would be a VI-6, which functionally doesn't make any sense.
#6
Quote by mattrusso
It's not the same at all. E minor is built from the same basic set of notes as G major, but the tonal center is E, not G. That alone is a HUGE difference. Also, minor keys have a different (similar, but not the same) set of "rules" from major keys. One example in this tune would be the fact that many people play E-6 as the tonic chord instead of E- or E-7. If this was G major, this would be a VI-6, which functionally doesn't make any sense.


Oh, I always heard that you can switch between the two and that's why a lot of backtracks have both the major and minor keys attached to them. I'm no master such as yourself but I thought you could. In a way I thought it was like using a mode.

Sorry.
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#7
its G minor

its always been G minor

the only people who play in E minor are ones who think owning a real book makes them jazz players

call autumn leaves at an actual jazz jam. they will know its G minor or quickly out themselves as nothingness.