MattTheArsonist
Registered Stooge
Join date: Feb 2005
1,688 IQ
#1
Let's liven this forum up a little bit:

It can be said with relative ease that many brilliant punk rock stars have been influenced by great literature. Henry Rollins, for example, is admittedly a huge Charles Bukowski, Henry Miller, and F. Scott Fitzgerald fan and runs his own publishing company that publishes his own authored titles on a very regular basis. Ian MacKaye has claimed to read and love everything by Kurt Vonnegut and Gore Vidal.

So. What kind of literature do you fine punk rock aficionados read? What are your favorite books? Do you read? Why or why not? Etc. Etc. Etc.
MattTheArsonist
Registered Stooge
Join date: Feb 2005
1,688 IQ
#2
I'll be the first to respond.

I read a lot as a teenager, as teenagers in suburban homes often have very little else to do. I quit after high school and only read comic books for about three or four years running. My favorite books back then were typical of a high schooler into punk rock and horror movies. Get in the Van, Our Band Could Be Your Life, etc. A Clockwork Orange, 1984, etc. The classics everyone has read, Frankenstein, Dracula, etc. All good books.

In 2011, I was sent to an undisclosed location in Southwest Asia for a time and found myself with very little to do in my free time while I was there. On my 22nd birthday over there, I picked up a copy of Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut (whom I had only read Breakfast of Champions by as a teenager) and suddenly, I couldn't stop myself. I became a reading machine. Between working 12-hour days, six days a week, I was reading about 5-6 books a week for several months and have been unable to stop. SH-5 opened up an old door for me again and I quickly sped through KV's entire fiction bibliography. His work, to me, was supreme in nature in every imaginable way. His humor and wit in the face of horrifying realities was endearing, his style of prose was short, poppy, and entertaining. His ability to make me laugh and cry about terrifying and macabre subjects was nothing short of amazing. Not only that, he opened up a new door for me to all his literary influences, and their literary influences. I became obsessed with reading MORE.

Today, I've slowed down because I'm back home at work and doing some amount of schooling, so I'm down to about 2-3 books a week, sometimes more or less. I've read around 45 novels and short story collections this year.

Nowadays, my favorite authors include Hemingway, Faulkner, Camus, etc. Gaiman and Chabon are my two favorite contemporaries.

The Sound and the Fury and For Whom the Bell Tolls have been supremely influential in my own life and writing. The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay and American Gods are juggernauts of modern fiction.

And there are many more I could name, but I will spare you. Doubtless, I may be the only person that posts on this thread, and doubtless, I've probably made this response too long-winded anyhow.
MattTheArsonist
Registered Stooge
Join date: Feb 2005
1,688 IQ
#3
I also, forgot to mention my love for Bukowski's novels. Ham on Rye is an amazing insight into the childhood of this disturbed and talented man.
lolmnt
Earth of the Butt
Join date: Sep 2006
4,159 IQ
#4
I like a lot of post modern stuff. Delillo, Vonnegut, Rushdie, etc.
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shoegazer'
Still Haven't Found
Join date: Feb 2012
168 IQ
#6
Camus rules, Robert Smith wrote about his book "The Stranger" in his sons Killing an Arab.
to here knows when
sargasm
1977 and we are going mad
Join date: May 2003
1,817 IQ
#7
The Plague is another good Camus. I'm not big on the beats, I guess bukowski is kind of a love it or hate it kind of thing and I fall mostly into the latter camp. I like Dostoevsky a lot, and Vonnegut of course. He always seems to be the go-to guy for anyone under 25 with a sense of humor. Other than Sci-Fi is kinda my thing. Clarke, Asimov, Bradbury, Wells, **** yeah. Heinlen can eat a dick though.
manualex
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Join date: Mar 2012
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#8
Lipstick Traces: A Secret History of the 20th Century

The book covers 20th century avant-garde art movements like Dadaism, Lettrist International and Situationist International and their influence on late 20th century countercultures and The Sex Pistols and punk movement.
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MattTheArsonist
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Join date: Feb 2005
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#9
Quote by sargasm
The Plague is another good Camus. I'm not big on the beats, I guess bukowski is kind of a love it or hate it kind of thing and I fall mostly into the latter camp. I like Dostoevsky a lot, and Vonnegut of course. He always seems to be the go-to guy for anyone under 25 with a sense of humor. Other than Sci-Fi is kinda my thing. Clarke, Asimov, Bradbury, Wells, **** yeah. Heinlen can eat a dick though.


Do you really consider Bukowski a beat author? I figured he was a couple decades too late.
sargasm
1977 and we are going mad
Join date: May 2003
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#10
Quote by MattTheArsonist
Do you really consider Bukowski a beat author? I figured he was a couple decades too late.


He often gets mentioned in the same breath as the beats, maybe because his style is similar, so I guess I just made that connection in my head.
MattTheArsonist
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Join date: Feb 2005
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#11
Quote by sargasm
He often gets mentioned in the same breath as the beats, maybe because his style is similar, so I guess I just made that connection in my head.


I agree his style is similar, but I think ultimately distinct.
DanRev
Boom/Bap?
Join date: Nov 2005
129 IQ
#12
Yeah I'll second/third/forth/funf/de'ath Camus - but call Sartre a bore (apart from Les Mains Sales - 'You think you can govern innocently?').

You lot need to check Flann O' Brien - Like James Joyce but concise and funnier, and I ****ing love Joyce but then I have no life so can afford to.

https://biblioklept.files.wordpress.com/2013/05/lit-crit.jpg

Obviously love Orwell - his rules for writing are PUNK AS ****

All the utopian writers - Fourier, Morris is all good shit; populist stuff that REAL PEOPLE read (past tense).


ps wuts up?


edit: and on the topic of sci-fi: Jack Vance died recently: he was really good: colon:
Last edited by DanRev at Jun 22, 2013,
llanafreak44
boom tah boom-boom tah
Join date: Dec 2005
3,358 IQ
#13
I have a ton of cheap books I bought online from Amazon, but I haven't gotten to read a single one due to how busy I am. I need to graduate college already.
lolmnt
Earth of the Butt
Join date: Sep 2006
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#15
Camus can do, but Sartre is smartre.
*-)
Quote by Bob_Sacamano
i kinda wish we all had a penis and vagina instead of buttholes

i mean no offense to buttholes and poop or anything

Rest in Peace, Troy Davis and Trayvon Martin and Jordan Davis and Eric Garner and Mike Brown
lavazza
K**e sold out
Join date: Dec 2005
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#16
Quote by DanRev

You lot need to check Flann O' Brien - Like James Joyce but concise and funnier, and I ****ing love Joyce but then I have no life so can afford to.


O'Brien is absolutely great.

After reading about his atom-exchange-theory (is that the correct expression in english?), that men get bikes and bikes get men, when you ride on them too often and that it is a sin to ride a ladies bicycle as man, I bought the third policeman and really loved that book.

Until now I got At-swim-two-birds, The Dalkey Archive and An Béal Bocht/The Poor Mouth.....
Just a couple of days ago I finished The Dalkey Archive which is my favourite until now. It´s a story about a young man who accidently meets de Selby a scientist who works on a way to destroy the atmosphere and who meets saints. Furthermore there´s James Joyce who...... I better stop here. You should read that all.

(I think the only novel of O'Brien I still need is The Hard Life which was translated to German by Heinrich Böll, the nobel prize winner of 1972.....).

You probably lose a lot when you translate stuff, but I´ve read a couple of poems and short stories by Bukowski, but to me it always sounds like he´s fighting with a linguistic club, nothing subtle and everything straight out.

I also like George Orwell. In his case I prefer the journalistic work, like Hommage to Catalonia or Down and out in Paris and London.
From time to time I also still read Brecht, Tucholsky, a bit Karl Kraus or Heine. They are all really good, but are rather for a short read.

The last book I finished was the debut novel of Magnus Mills. I´ve read two other books by him like two years ago. He´s really good and I´m proud of myself that I also read authors who are still alive.

I came from the same region where Vonneguts parents come from. I also like his work, though not too often and I think he´s better in writing essays like in A man without a country than writing whole novels. I´ve als read Breakfast of Champions, Slaughterhouse 5 and God bless you Mr Rosewater.

A problem for me is that I need books you can read sitting in a train and the versions of Camus novels I have often have a hard-digestible layout, but the time to read him will come.
lavazza
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Join date: Dec 2005
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#17
Quote by █▐▌█▐▌
"I'm into surrealism, French, erotic, symbolism and existentialism, including:
René Descartes, Marquis de Sade, André Breton, Georges Bataille, Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Mira Gonzalez, Pierre Louÿs, Friedrich Nietzsche, Legs McNeil, Tristan Tzara, Benjamin Péret, Comte de Lautréamont, Arthur Rimbaud, Stéphane Mallarmé, Charles Baudelaire, YHWH.

Check out my music taste: http://www.last.fm/user/FaygoBro420"

a bunch of dudes, how gross. i have been looking for lady writers i can vibe to but have not had much luck outside of a few critic/scholar types. :/


Snob.

I´ve read Breton´s book of black humour. It´s good. It contains Lichtenberg, Grabbe, de Quincey and some other stuff I´ve forgotten that´s really funny.
de Sade is really disgusting thouhg.
DanRev
Boom/Bap?
Join date: Nov 2005
129 IQ
#18
Quote by lavazza


A problem for me is that I need books you can read sitting in a train and the versions of Camus novels I have often have a hard-digestible layout, but the time to read him will come.



Yup definately. I got Molloy by Samuel Beckett a month or two ago and its just so dense, compared to his plays which are all aphorism, punctuation and short sharp wit. There's some nice turns of phrase in there but each page just seems like a wall of text. I read The Fall ( La Chute) by Camus and loved it, but wasn't quite sure why.


I have still not read any Vonnegut... Shall be rectified now that I have a job.


I like reading long form journalism aswell - really recommend NSFWcorp. Weekly digital issues and monthly print editions. Some really good stuff - particularly the War Nerd who just writes beautifully bluntly (some may say irrevently) on obscure little wars around the world.

https://www.nsfwcorp.com/

(its mostly behind a paywall but I can unlock anything if anyone wants it)
man_suits
and stuff...
Join date: Jun 2011
135 IQ
#21
Blood Meridian -Cormac McCarthy (best book ever)

Donald Barthelme, Hemingway, Tom Robbins, and just a lot of other off beat post modern stuff.
MattTheArsonist
Registered Stooge
Join date: Feb 2005
1,688 IQ
#22
I've only ever read Child of God by Cormac McCarthy, but from what I hear everyone seems to love Blood Meridian, I suppose I better sit down and read it.
Iluvpowerchords
Flau-BEAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAR
Join date: Jan 2005
1,365 IQ
#23
Blood Meridian is a durn good yarn and contains perhaps my favorite antagonist of all time so read it.

Reading is neat. I recently fell into The Yiddish Policemen's Union by Michael Chabon and have no choice but to read my way out. I can't believe I slept on dude so long.

His descriptors are amazing, evocative, et al.

They are disarmingly weird but incredibly apt and it makes the things he is describing excitingly vivid. This is where I would give examples for a school paper.

He is also great at describing food. I am finding that oddly very important to me in a writer. I think it is a mark of quality even. I suppose it is because having a relationship to food is such an integral part of the human experience that if you can convey that in any kind of novel way you will probably do well with other, weightier aspects of it.

For instance I just finished reading The Windup Girl, which is a novel partially about what happens when we **** with our food supply too eagerly and I was not impressed with it at all.

OMG sometimes I think I have wasted all my good thoughts on this silly website. Must find other mediums of expression.
bradulator
normcore
Join date: Jul 2007
2,475 IQ
#24
The REAL question is do you use physical books or e-books?
“Just to sum up: I would do various things very quickly.” - Donald Trump
MattTheArsonist
Registered Stooge
Join date: Feb 2005
1,688 IQ
#25
Quote by Iluvpowerchords
Blood Meridian is a durn good yarn and contains perhaps my favorite antagonist of all time so read it.

Reading is neat. I recently fell into The Yiddish Policemen's Union by Michael Chabon and have no choice but to read my way out. I can't believe I slept on dude so long.

His descriptors are amazing, evocative, et al.

They are disarmingly weird but incredibly apt and it makes the things he is describing excitingly vivid. This is where I would give examples for a school paper.

He is also great at describing food. I am finding that oddly very important to me in a writer. I think it is a mark of quality even. I suppose it is because having a relationship to food is such an integral part of the human experience that if you can convey that in any kind of novel way you will probably do well with other, weightier aspects of it.

For instance I just finished reading The Windup Girl, which is a novel partially about what happens when we **** with our food supply too eagerly and I was not impressed with it at all.

OMG sometimes I think I have wasted all my good thoughts on this silly website. Must find other mediums of expression.


If you haven't read Kavalier and Clay by Chabon, you gotta. That book will blow yo' mind. I love Wonder Boys by him, too.
MattTheArsonist
Registered Stooge
Join date: Feb 2005
1,688 IQ
#26
Quote by bradulator
The REAL question is do you use physical books or e-books?


I read both, sucka! Mostly physical.
man_suits
and stuff...
Join date: Jun 2011
135 IQ
#27
Quote by bradulator
The REAL question is do you use physical books or e-books?


I prefer to own a physical copy of the books I read, but thanks to college owning my bank account I have to make do with what I can afford.

This is the main reason why I wish that the used book store thing would catch on in my area.

I love used book stores.
█▐▌█▐▌
Join date: Apr 2011
1,459 IQ
#28
Quote by Iluvpowerchords
OMG sometimes I think I have wasted all my good thoughts on this silly website. Must find other mediums of expression.

i have been keeping a diary lately it is so much better, i recommend it.
Last edited by █▐▌█▐▌ at Jul 19, 2013,
eric_wearing
KillerOfIdiocracy
Join date: Oct 2011
1,542 IQ
#29
I read these three great books involving punk culture...well one but the other two are worth a mention:

Mosh Pit. This lesbian learns this other chick is no good for her all while living the stereotypical punk bohemian lifestyle of a girl with a doped up mommy.

Heavy Metal & You. Despite the title and the main character's love for all things metal, it's more punk than metal. Anyway, it's about a metalhead teen who finds this preppy girl who he's taken a liking to. The Girl turns out to be evil.

Godless. Agnostic going on Atheist kid decides to start his own religion as a joke with his friends (well..they aren't friends) and it goes too far causing problems for the entire city. Better watch what's in your water
Theory is just...wow. I'm getting a bit over my head by trying to learn so much w/o formal educators

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