#1
Is there a reason that E major chord played open seems to sound the clearest and G major and C major when played by me sound awful to my ears?
Last edited by CricketBat at Jun 20, 2013,
#2
Because E major has the root in the highest and lowest voices, both which are using open strings, which allows it to ring with a more shimmering quality than a fretted note.
#3
Might well be the intonation of your guitar. If you tune it to be perfectly in tune for an E major chord, the G string is going to be a little sharp through both the C and G chords out of tune.
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#4
Or you have set your strings too close to the neck so they make noise. Depends on your definition of "clear sound".
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#6
Quote by Artemis Entreri
Might well be the intonation of your guitar. If you tune it to be perfectly in tune for an E major chord, the G string is going to be a little sharp through both the C and G chords out of tune.


So is this a compromise thing? A guitar can't ever be perfectly in tune with every chord?

And what i'm saying by "clean" is they just seem a little off. with a G chord it's almost sounds like two chords being play simultaneously to me. also the sound of the high E/G string seems to sort of "stick out" more than the rest. I realise this could be my poor technique.
#7
Technically saying, a guitar can never be perfectly in tune, but some levels of differences in intonation are tolerated by human ear. Tolerance depends on individual sense of hearing.
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#10
Quote by CricketBat
So is this a compromise thing? A guitar can't ever be perfectly in tune with every chord?

And what i'm saying by "clean" is they just seem a little off. with a G chord it's almost sounds like two chords being play simultaneously to me. also the sound of the high E/G string seems to sort of "stick out" more than the rest. I realise this could be my poor technique.


This is intonation. That "two chords" thing means the strings are far enough out of tune that they create a difference tone from their waves. It's one way to tune a guitar; using difference tones. Play a G chord and tune it so that every note is in tune with that G chord. When you play the E chord it'll sound the way the G and C did.
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#11
can we please not get into equal temperament here, you're just gonna confuse TS unless you're trying to sell him those specialized fretwires. at that point you might as well tell him to cough up another $100 for an evertune bridge and $50 for some locking tuners

TS, your intonation and/or technique are probably to blame here, though voicing does play a role in how a chord will sound, and that can be a positive or negative thing based on context and your aural palate.

the best way to understand intonation would be to go to a guitar tech, pay him to set it up, and watch every step of the way and ask plenty of questions so you can do it yourself and understand the nuts and bolts of guitar physics.

as your neck tension changes and adjusts over time, essentially (or from artificial things like you changing your strings or adjusting your action), your string distances might not be appropriate, meaning that your E string might be a perfectly tuned E while the rest of your strings are sharp or flat, forcing you to adjust your bridge until everything is savvy. this can require adjustment of the truss rod, but definitely go to a tech for that if you feel that's the case - amateur truss rod adjustment is about as contentious as modes and could really mess you up without proper care and attention.
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Last edited by Hail at Jun 20, 2013,
#12
Quote by CricketBat
So is this a compromise thing? A guitar can't ever be perfectly in tune with every chord?


Yes, the guitar is an equal tempered instrument so every key is more or less out of tune the same amount. It's the compromise between having perfectly tuned intervals or the ability to modulate.

All this is provided you're guitar is properly constructed & intonated, which is the most likely culprit.
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#14
Quote by Hail
$50 for some locking tuners



hey, locking tuners are really convenient.