#1
Hello, i was wondering how to go about "learning" other instruments in order to help with my composition with guitar. What i mean is for example i dont know how to play drums, but i would like to know how to now "how" to play them so that i can compose parts for drums with my riffs as to give a more complete structure/sound. So not necessarily learning how to play physically, just more so on how their played to help me write. I know a lot of guitar players write with a drum machine as to give much more full structure. How would you suggest going about this? Thanks!
#2
get a DAW and map midi, or just in general listen to and actively pay attention to how that instrument interacts with music. explore a little bit - you don't need to play drums or bass or guitar to figure out what they're doing in a given situation
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#3
You know, my general feeling is I do two things well: I play guitar and I sing. So the important parts for me to write are those parts, because I can write good parts a guitar or a voice.

Drums? Because I don't know how to play drums, and I don't practice drums, and it's not a part of my regular music routine, I'm not going to THINK in drums. So I could get a drum machine or a bunch of loops, and you know what? All I'm going to do is give my good guitar and vocal parts a crappy drum part.

The thing that makes a good drummer good isn't his physical coordination. A dozen drummers a year graduate MI who are just fine at that. A good drummer is good because he thinks of approaching songs as a drummer in interesting ways. He has good ideas. If I had good drumming ideas, I'd be a drummer.

If you don't have access to a drummer and want to create some sort of temp track, I guess ... but I think you'd be far, far better off finding an actual drummer.

YMMV.
#4
Quote by HotspurJr
If you don't have access to a drummer and want to create some sort of temp track, I guess ... but I think you'd be far, far better off finding an actual drummer.


this is true to some extent

the issue, however, lies with the cohesiveness of the piece. if you're writing specifically for, say, vocals and guitar, it's easy for your composition to get stuck, even with a great bassist/drummer/keyboardist/kazoo player/etc., at the potential of your vocal and guitar parts because they're made without consideration of the rest of the ensemble.

even if you're not writing the drum part, you want to be able to write a guitar part that complements a drum part, if i'm making any sense.

a composer doesn't need to know how to play the trombone, but if he intends on using one, he better know how to orchestrate to accommodate one, or at least how to create space within the ensemble for the trombone to exist without it being delegated to a dumbed-down tuba/trumpet part in a different register.
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Hail isn't too edgy for posts, posts are not edgy enough for Hail.


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#5
I don't really play drums but I think I can write pretty decent sounding drum parts. You don't need to be a drummer to be able to think about how the drum beat you want will sound like. You could try beatboxing a drumbeat and then trying to replicate it with drums. Most drum beats are pretty simple. You just need to listen to the overall groove of the song and hear where the most important beats are. You may want to emphasize them with a kick and/or snare. Hi hat just usually plays 8ths or 16ths all the time.

At least you can have an idea what you would like the drumbeat to sound like and then tell that to the drummer. For example: play the same rhythm as guitar/bass plays.
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