#1
What could be easier! What are the important points in converting a 3/4 classical guitar into a salon steel stringed sort of replica. Apart from fitting a steel tailpiece to take the extra tension.
#3
Quote by CricketBat
Does a classical guitar have a truss rod? i don't think they do.
Some do, some don't. Some have them, but they're not adjustable. Just a slug under the fret board, as it were.
#5
Quote by stepchildusmc
i have but one question....WHY?
Because I CAN....dammit. Because I can.... DAMMIT... Because I dog double DAMMIT can....

(Give me a sec here, I'm trying to work out the meter).
#6
This one has a truss rod, it's an Ortega. Most decent classical guitars have a truss rod, all are adjustable. Most 'electric guitar strummers' seem to think that because they can't see the truss rod adjustment on a classical guitar that it therefore isn't there. The adjustment is at the top of the neck inside the sound hole. Most strummers have never been that far up their guitars neck.
#7
Quote by Dr Brodsky
This one has a truss rod, it's an Ortega. Most decent classical guitars have a truss rod, all are adjustable. Most 'electric guitar strummers' seem to think that because they can't see the truss rod adjustment on a classical guitar that it therefore isn't there. The adjustment is at the top of the neck inside the sound hole. Most strummers have never been that far up their guitars neck.
Well first doc, you're in the acoustic guitar forum. So, I (at least at this point in my life), wouldn't categorize my self as an, "electric guitar strummer".

I'm also aware of the location of the truss rod adjustment on my steel string acoustics, which are in exactly the same place you describe for classicals. I think it's usually a 5mm hex key, (all mine are), and the relief should be about .010", give or take. Should you encounter a different size, or loose the wrench that came with any guitar, replacements are available here:

http://www.stewmac.com/shop/Truss_rods/Wrenches,_hex_keys/Soundhole_Truss_Rod_Wrenches.html

I hope I passed the audition.
#8
I know where to go for my wenches, but thanks anyway. Classical guitars are a lot tougher and more complicated than most electric guitar strummers give them credit for. I like my wenches weak and simple though.
#9
Quote by Dr Brodsky
This one has a truss rod, it's an Ortega. Most decent classical guitars have a truss rod, all are adjustable. Most 'electric guitar strummers' seem to think that because they can't see the truss rod adjustment on a classical guitar that it therefore isn't there. The adjustment is at the top of the neck inside the sound hole. Most strummers have never been that far up their guitars neck.


That's where it is on both my steel strings. I thought they didn't because I have an Admira classical and it doesn't have a truss rod hole in the same spot.
#10
Quote by CricketBat
That's where it is on both my steel strings. I thought they didn't because I have an Admira classical and it doesn't have a truss rod hole in the same spot.
I'm well aware that most, "nylon sting guitars", do have truss rods, and that many Ovation steel string acoustics, have exactly the same truss rod adjustment protocol as do electrics, with the adjustment on the headstock.

As to if or whether the guitar in question has a truss rod, or "all classical guitars have truss rods", I'm unwilling to commit to such a sweeping generality. Any time I have in the past, some snot bag has taken the issue to task. I usually argue to win, and therefore am most often the recipient of the "coveted warning trophy".

I don't know as, "all classical guitars have truss rods". Can't really say, since I haven't seen them all.

As far as the topic goes, there are enough other reasons present to warrant the suggestion of not doing so. (Putting steel strings on a classical guitar). If you think any of us are wrong in that assessment, please feel free to lobby in that direction.

I simply don't care. I don't want a nylon string guitar, and therefore, all my guitars, have steel strings and truss rods, which I'm capable of adjusting without assistance or intervention on the part of another.
#11
I have a classical right now that has silk and steel strings. thin and light so no issues with damaging the guitar. I have two identical classicals so one has the silk and steel, the other has nylons. and plus i have the third classical (which I love a lot) which has the nylon strings again.


you can do it but in the end it's not gonna sound as good as the acoustic guitar
#12
No it won't sound as good. But it is a 3/4 classical so the steel strings will make it louder and the 'salon' look is ideal for beach parties. And if it brakes it will be ideal BBQ timber.
#13
Quote by Dr Brodsky
No it won't sound as good. But it is a 3/4 classical so the steel strings will make it louder and the 'salon' look is ideal for beach parties. And if it brakes it will be ideal BBQ timber.
Indeed, like the "Godzilla" of ukuleles.
#15
Quote by Dr Brodsky
Don't anger the tiki gods.


OTOH, maybe we could throw the guitar into the nearest volcano to appease them....
#16
Fitted the tailpiece and strap button this morning, strap button, I need to buy a strap now, this is getting more expensive. Still debating on the choice of strings, to be on the safe side maybe a combination of plain steel Martin medium gauge, if the tension gets too great on these the string will snap before doing any damage to the guitar and D'addario folk brass wound nylon for the bass 3. These can be bought individually. More expense. Checked out the tension charts, this set up will reduce the tension by a massive amount.
#17
Is that a lower tension than just a straight up set of, "acoustic extra light"? These are .010 to .047 and come in at about 135 Lbs for the set.

I know you could also cobble sets together from gauges normally included in 12 string sets.
#18
fyi, I'm about to give up with acoustic, electric guitars. The steel strings started to harden the tips of my left fingers. I begin to feel like a car mechanic with rough hands. I'm going back to nylon soon.
#21
Why just the other day I broke a nail playing my 12 string. That did it, I'm quitting!

Now if you'll excuse me while I go change my tampon...
#22
I'm not sure if it was mentioned, but if the tension is higher than it can take, you don't just have to worry about the neck bowing, you could easily snap your bridge right off.

Most classical guitars I've seen don't have the capability to sustain that much tension
Quote by EndTheRapture51
Anyway I have technically statutory raped #nice

Quote by EndThecRinge51
once a girl and i promised to never leave each other

since that promise was broken

i dont make promises any more
#23
Quote by megano28
I'm not sure if it was mentioned, but if the tension is higher than it can take, you don't just have to worry about the neck bowing, you could easily snap your bridge right off.

Most classical guitars I've seen don't have the capability to sustain that much tension
Can there be exploration without risk? I think not.

Besides, if it's your guitar, and you're doing this "AFA", you don't even have to sign a waiver.

Not to mention the comical anecdote you'll have to tell, practically forever, if the bridge flies off and hits you in the forehead.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jun 23, 2013,
#24
Quote by megano28
Most classical guitars I've seen don't have the capability to sustain that much tension


I think that's correct, if you want steel strings get an acoustic and sell/keep your classical.
#25
You seem not to have read that a metal tailpiece has been fitted. That would mean that the tension is now pushing the bridge down towards the body and not pulling it away, so highly unlikely to fly off. Selling the classical guitar and buying a steel string acoustic is not an option. The 3/4 classical was bought secondhand with the modification in mind, why? Because of the 'salon' look. Let me explain, I'll try and keep it simple for all the electric guitar strummers who can't read. Once upon a time before the invention of Oasis guitar players needed instruments that sounded louder, they needed metal strings. The cheapest way to do this was to convert the classical guitar you already had. Smaller guitars were easier to carry around as Subaru Impreza's had not been invented yet either. So what you would see paying at the salon, starbucks had yet to be invented as well, were small classical guitars (full size ones as well) that had been altered to take steel strings, you had to compete with banjo's and steel stringed mandolins, not to mention clarinets sometimes. It is a period look I'm after.
#26
But dude, wouldn't it really be a funny story to tell your children as you try to teach them how to play the guitar, if it did?

Everybody has great advice on how to spend your money, but nobody's going to cut you a check. "And so it goes". (Kurt Vonnegut Jr)
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jun 24, 2013,
#27
Captain, we do not live in a cartoon world where people slip on banana skins, stand on garden rakes and run in mid air before looking down and falling. We live in a world that odeys the laws of physics. The force would be in the direction of the guitars body, regardless of how many joints you smoke.
#28
The standard wisdom is, of course, that it's a disaster waiting to happen. There is an awful lot of difference, as noted, in the tension supplied by different string sets, and also in the construction of the guitars.
Chances are if you bought a nice, lightly-constructed flamenco instrument and stuck a set of phosphor-bronze mediums on it... You'd better stand back.

However... When I was first living in sin with my wife-to-be, her ex had kept "her" guitar. (he bought it...) Anyway, she was pining for a guitar. I knew nothing...She little more.
So, we went to a music store and hanging on the wall was a little Suzuki classical (this was about 1975) that had been strung with steel strings.
50 bucks. We bought it and she played it for two years without any difficulty at all.
So... Lots of variables. The construction of the instrument, the strings chosen....
#29
Quote by Dr Brodsky
Captain, we do not live in a cartoon world where people slip on banana skins, stand on garden rakes and run in mid air before looking down and falling. We live in a world that odeys the laws of physics. The force would be in the direction of the guitars body, regardless of how many joints you smoke.
Well first, let me say I've moved on to the coke and heroine mixture, "formerly known as speed ball". As was of course predicted by the government's anti-drug propaganda of the day.

But more importantly, I'm here for the laughs. Other than timing, comedy doesn't really fall prey to the laws of physics.

And lest you forget, I'm not the one repeatedly antagonizing and nagging you to spend your money, to quell their fears.

Since your decision has already been made and is in the process of being implemented, it would behoove the others who have participated after that occurred, to consider the thread "solved", and drop it.

If you think I still have the idea in my head I'm going to change your mind, I don't

If you're serious about this to the point where I'm an intrusion, (or simply not funny), then by all means let me know, and I'll opt out of receiving notifications regarding this thread....
#30
This thread and the original post was never about whether it should be attempted or not, as I have explained previously, it has been done a thousand times over, but it was about finding out what should be considered. The new tailpiece and the choice of strings have been considered. I merely wondered if anyone had experience and could suggest other considerations. Is that regular or sugar free coke you use.
#33
2 cranky's on one thread ! this is classic !!!!!
need more gear and a lot more talent(courtesytuxs)
#34
Quote by Dr Brodsky
I don't recognise that chord diagram, is it a diminised 7th.
It's not a chord diagram, it's a tab for the song, "Cocaine".
#37
Quote by Dr Brodsky
Is that Claptons original tablature.
It's a collaboration between him and David Gilmour...