#1
So I'm trying to teach myself this theory madness because I feel like it's cool to know, and it might help me get better.

I memorized the circle of fifths, and the notes each key. (my vocab might still suck), I see that the next step is intervals? So I've downloaded some apps to help me hear intervals, and I'm trying to memorize each interval in every key now.

First of all, that's a lot of memorization... when I try to memorize I want to know it like the back of my hand, so I pound the studying in. I see it's gonna take a while.

My question is, is learning intervals more-so about the memorization? Like oh A - G is major 7th, and B-D# is a major third. Or is it more importantly about hearing the difference between the pitch?

And will the pitch sound the same for EVERY interval? (ex. A-G major 7th pitch sound the same as C-B major 7th?) if that makes sense... help in any way. I would like to know what I'm doing here.

I can't afford a teacher, do not suggest that, please.
#2
A major seventh will sound like a major seventh no matter what. You don't need to memorize intervals in every key though, because every key is the same. As long as you know the rules governing what accidentals are used when, then you should be fine as far as naming them correctly.

Memorizing intervals on paper really just accompanies familiarity with notes. I've never really made it a point to drill it in my head, but it's come along for me fairly well. As far as hearing them, that's the most useful. Are you singing back the intervals? Are you practicing ascending and descending intervals?? Singing them back is great for internalizing them.
^^The above is a Cryptic Metaphor^^


"To know the truth of history is to realize its ultimate myth and its inevitable ambiguity." Everything is made up and the facts don't matter.


MUSIC THEORY LINK
Last edited by rockingamer2 at Jun 21, 2013,
#3
Thank God... I was writing each and every one of them down, I was about to cry.
I honestly haven't been doing the ear training with intervals as much as the writing so I will enforce that way more.
No I'm not singing them back, and uhh ascending and descending? Can you elaborate on that a little?
I will start singing them back though, I really appreciate the reply. I can move further now.
#4
Keep in mind, that my experience involved doing class work that involved notes, but I don't know your situation. Maybe getting a work book or some exercises will help insure that you get the practice in.

By ascending and descending I mean going up AND down in pitch. You should know major sixth sounds like going in both directions.

A little more guidance: I suggest learning intervals in groups, since some are easier than others. This grouping is a guideline, so feel free to tweak it if you wish.

Octave, Perfect Fourths, Perfect Fifths

Major/Minor Seconds, Major/Minor Thirds, Major Sevenths

Minor Sevenths, Major/Minor Sixths, Tritone

Making a list of songs that feature those intervals is another useful tool. This website is a great resource, and feel free to use songs that you like to listen to as examples when possible.

You may find the intervals harder or easier to learn than the "order" I've used, as major sevenths are pretty easy to learn since it's just one semitone from a perfect octave and can feel the pull, same with the the Tritone.
^^The above is a Cryptic Metaphor^^


"To know the truth of history is to realize its ultimate myth and its inevitable ambiguity." Everything is made up and the facts don't matter.


MUSIC THEORY LINK
#5
Great! I couldn't have asked for a better response. I really appreciate this brah, I'll begin tonight and stop never... Thanks for the insight, and for the link!
#6
Don't forget to practice all this stuff on the guitar, too.

practice everything in circle of 5ths/4ths order, varying rhythms, etc.