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#1
I have been looking around places, but I can't seem to find any place to start learning this shit from. I have a mac and Xcode and I want to learn the language objective C but I don't know where to learn it, and I want to learn how the language works and I don't know where to look for that either. Should I learn C before I learn obj. C? What are some good places for an absolute beginner to learn this stuff?

My ultimate goal is to know everything so that I can make apps and games and just screw with people's computers if the situation presents itself.
#2
Nononnononono

Don't start with objective C.

Don't start with Mac programming at all.

Start with easy languages like Basic (in any form), and move from there. The most important thing about programming is learning the logical thinking behind it, which is much easier when you don't have to worry about bullshit syntax like with Obj C.

Try a Basic language. Really, any of them.
#3
Quote by CoreysMonster
Nononnononono

Don't start with objective C.

Don't start with Mac programming at all.

Start with easy languages like Basic (in any form), and move from there. The most important thing about programming is learning the logical thinking behind it, which is much easier when you don't have to worry about bullshit syntax like with Obj C.

Try a Basic language. Really, any of them.

What are some basic languages?
#5
Quote by macashmack
What are some basic languages?

Esperanto.
Quote by Carmel
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ಠ_ಠ
#6
Quote by macashmack
What are some basic languages?


in addition to the aforementioned:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BASIC

which i haven't actually learned... i think Python is also okay to start with.
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#7
Quote by macashmack
What are some basic languages?

When I say Basic language, I literally mean BASIC, the language.

Try Visual Basic.
#8
I suggest you check out the python tutorials at codeacademy.com and then check out thenewboston on youtube. Coursera is also useful, introductory programming courses will begin in a couple months or there's this self-study one here https://www.coursera.org/course/cs101

Python -> Java -> C/C++ -> x86 ASM
Last edited by Godsmack_IV at Jun 23, 2013,
#9
Quote by CoreysMonster
When I say Basic language, I literally mean BASIC, the language.

Try Visual Basic.

I only have a macbook it doesn't work on a mac.
#11
Quote by macashmack
I only have a macbook it doesn't work on a mac.

You can install Windows, no?

Learning to program on Mac OS is ridiculous.

Quote by NothingRocks
Coding in Visual Basic is a miserable experience. Try starting with something like C#, Java, Python, or Ruby.

Those languages are pretty well documented and have fairly intuitive syntax.

What, no it's not.

Anyways, bottom line, pick an easy language like Basic, Java, C# or whatever, and just learn the logic behind programming. That's the most important part.

And dont do it on Mac OS, ffs.
Last edited by CoreysMonster at Jun 23, 2013,
#12
I've had programming courses with a guy who has been programming for 15+ years and he told me that BASIC is the worst language you can learn. He taught me the principle behind C++ within a month.

Believe what you want.
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Aw yeah.
#13
try Python, dead easy and tons of support and tutorials.
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#15
Quote by TheNameOfNoone
I've had programming courses with a guy who has been programming for 15+ years and he told me that BASIC is the worst language you can learn. He taught me the principle behind C++ within a month.

Believe what you want.

Sure, when you know processors inside and out Basic will seem like the worst language, but to somebody who doesn't know what an If Clause is, it can be super helpful.

Also all advanced programmers are dicks.
#17
I would say to start with python. Its easy, yet has a rich library that allows you to do a lot of things. if you don't want to progr on mac, install vmware virtual machine software and get a lightweight distribution of linux and program on the virtual machine.

Edit: don't start with c or c++ btw. I started with c and while I think its a great language, it gets hard to do more interesting things past numerical computation stuff because of how small the main library is and how convoluted certain libraries are, like the socket api's.
Last edited by ironman1478 at Jun 23, 2013,
#18
Objective C is an awesome language but it's quite difficult to get your head around all the other stuff you need to know to make iOS/OSX programs (which I assume you want to do).

I'd recommend you start with a scripting language such as PHP. Then go from there. It has a C-like syntax but it's much easier to pick up because it doesn't use strict typing and you don't have to worry about memory management.

You'll run your PHP scripts from a web browser and you'll need a web server installed to do this, but OSX comes pre installed with an apache web server. Just do a quick google on how to set it up.

Also, as others have mentioned, Python is pretty cool to start with.

EDIT: Also, there's a Stanford university course that's on iTunes university called something like beginning iOS programming (it's by Paul Heagarty or something like that). It's free so I'd recommend downloading that if you do want to start with Objective C - but it requires you to have a basic knowledge of programming first.
Last edited by grantjames at Jun 23, 2013,
#20
Quote by CoreysMonster
Try a Basic language. Really, any of them.

No. Don't do this. It's 2013 and nobody uses that shit any more for a reason.

But don't learn a C language either.
The thing about mac programming was bullshit too, though xcode is a bit nasty, especially if you're just starting I can imagine. Mac is the superior platform for development though, you've already got a head start there. Anyone who seriously thinks programming on windows is a nice experience is experiencing stockholm syndrome.

My recommendation would be Python. It's nice and straightforward with human readable syntax and there is plenty of documentation.

www.python.org

And I'm here to help if you need it

Additional advice: don't bother learning about processors or any low level stuff unless you're actually interested or you end up in a situation where you actually need to know it. A lot of programming tutorials will try to get you to learn a load of shit that you really don't need, and it'll just slow you down or demoralise you.
Last edited by captainsnazz at Jun 23, 2013,
#21
Quote by captainsnazz
No. Don't do this. It's 2013 and nobody uses that shit any more for a reason.

Like anybody ever used Basic for anything since the 80's. It's still a good language to learn logic with.
#24
I just want to reiterate that python is possibly the easiest language ever. I made an entire visual novel in like two weeks using it with no knowledge of it beforehand. Game only took two weeks cause of writing/music/voice acting etc, no difficulties with the coding at all.
#25
Quote by CoreysMonster
Like anybody ever used Basic for anything since the 80's. It's still a good language to learn logic with.


You're right when you say that, but the same can be achieved learning a newer and equally easy language which is more useful today.

+1 to Python
#26
I studied AS Computing for a year, could have continued it on at A2 in college but the course was pretty shit. I'm dropping it for AS Graphic Communication.

We learnt a lot of theory about Computing in general, but the bad thing about it was that it felt like volatile knowledge, y'know, sort of stuff you only need to know for an exam, not actual stuff you need to know for practical stuff.

As far as practical went, we used Visual Basic. I haven't used and other language so I can't compare anything. I struggled a lot with understanding the general concept of programming. I didn't enjoy it at all. Getting a simple program to work didn't make me happy at all, only relieved.

Our teacher hoped we would practice stuff at home, few did. Half way through the year I had already made my mind up that Programming was not for me and that I couldn't wait to stop having to attend the classes.

What really annoyed me most though was how poor the course was at expressing how useful the subject is. To this day I have no clue where I would have landed if I was to continue the class. We didn't touch the surface of anything that was interesting or would be useful within a real working environment. Everything in the course was laid out for the exam.

So my point is, you don't have to study it academically. If you treat as a hobby then you're far more likely to go further. Obviously if you can do that then sure get something on paper to show you can do it. But if I was an employer then I'd be pretty cautious about who I employ, because on paper I have half an A Level in Computing and I know **** all about it.
#27
A Level computing was dreadful for me too. It was just a load of shite about microsoft office and printers and the odd bit of some shite basic language.
Computing education in the UK is just not useful in any way. I feel like it actually does the opposite of what it's meant to and pushes people like mr galon up here away from computers.
#28
Quote by captainsnazz
I feel like it actually does the opposite of what it's meant to and pushes people like mr galon up here away from computers.


Yeah totally. I had aspirations of TRYING to get into the gaming industry. I knew it would be ridiculously hard but after this past year, it totally put me off the idea and I no longer want to think about it anymore.
#30
In the beginning there was nothing, then the Great Programmer programmed the universe...on the first day he created the Operating Systems so that...[you get where I'm going with this]

meh, just go into business TS. Then you can hire a bunch of over-opinionated ****s to squabble about minute details for you.
BOOM-SHAKALAKALAKA-BOOM-SHAKALAKUNGA
#31
Quote by CoreysMonster

Learning to program on Mac OS is ridiculous.

lol you know how I know you don't really know programming?

...modes and scales are still useless.


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#32
Quote by CoreysMonster
Nononnononono

Don't start with objective C.

Don't start with Mac programming at all.

Start with easy languages like Basic (in any form), and move from there. The most important thing about programming is learning the logical thinking behind it, which is much easier when you don't have to worry about bullshit syntax like with Obj C.

Try a Basic language. Really, any of them.


This right here.
Last edited by CodeMonk at Jun 23, 2013,
#33
Quote by Dirge Humani
You can learn logic perfectly well with any language except for Lisp and shit like that.


you know, UC Berkeley used to use nothing but Scheme in the beginner programming classes. they've since moved to Python, but for a while Scheme was just fine for learning concepts.
Quote by archerygenious
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#34
TS, you should learn Perl. Good for scripts and cool immediate applicable things you can do.

...modes and scales are still useless.


Quote by PhoenixGRM
Hey guys could you spare a minute to Vote for my band. Go to the site Search our band Listana with CTRL+F for quick and vote Thank you .
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Voted for Patron Çıldırdı.

Thanks
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#35
If you're still having trouble getting started with basic, try looking up some stuff on pseudo-code. I took programming in college and this was the first class we had to take, it breaks down the logic behind programming really well and you don't actually have to code anything to understand it.
#36
Quote by Xiaoxi
TS, you should learn Perl. Good for scripts and cool immediate applicable things you can do.


I think Larry Wall (perl inventor) took some bad LSD. Lots of it.
The syntax if freaking weird.
But easy to use once you learn it.


I started with QuickBasic back in the early 90's.
I would download loads of apps with source code.
I would change one variable, run it, and see what changes it made (screen saver type things were fun for this).
Thats how I started learning.
Last edited by CodeMonk at Jun 23, 2013,
#37
If you want to write Mac/iOS apps, then start learning Objective-C. If you don't have any specific reason to learn programming and just want to learn a bit about it, pick any language, tt literally doesn't matter at all.

Python:
http://learnpythonthehardway.org/
http://www.openbookproject.net/thinkcs/python/english2e/
Ruby:
http://ruby.learncodethehardway.org/book/
Java:
http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/
I've never looked into Obj-C, so I couldn't tell you any good resources for that, but there's bound to be online tutorials.

That said, I'm not sure Xcode is the best way to start. I'm a proponent of text editor + command line, at least until you get your head around it. I think IDEs can be more of a hindrance than a help for noobs.
#38
2 years ago I had to take a programming class for my degree, having never done any programming before. We started in Python and I found it very straightforward and quite easy to learn. There's tons of documentation on it as well, which makes it easy to solve any problems you my have.
After a year we had a class on C++ and what I knew about Python pretty much translated perfectly to it.

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#40
After reading these comments, I'm going to go with python, because most recommended (the grammatical error is on purpose here).
A few of you guys are saying to learn the logical thinking behind programming; Where do I learn the logical thinking behind it? Just by watching tutorials and messing around with Python, or is there a specific place where it's just laid out in front of me and I can study it easily (I hope there is)?
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