#1
Hello.
Yesterday I bought a new guitar (Takamine G340S) and I changed the strings.
But after that I noticed that the new strings are 0.10 when the guitar comes with 0.12.
I can only but new strings tomorrow, what should I do in the meantime? Is that really damaging the guitar?
#2
Shouldn't hurt a thing... That would be the equivalent of going from a light-ish medium set to standard lights.
At worst, the very slight decrease in tension might require a very slight truss rod adjustment... But if you're not getting any buzz play on and see if you like 'em.
#3
NO damage done man You can easily change between gauges, but you'll have to intonate your guitar if you wish to keep strings that are of a different gauge.. As long as you are actually getting the other strings soon anyway, then there is nothing that can happen (it can never damage the guitar to use different string gauges )

Marc
There's only one boss I listen to, and that's why I'm unemployed.
#4
we put 10s on a lot of our guitars. it doesn't hurt them at all, although on a couple it's caused a little string buzz from the lower tension. ya slap a set of 12s back on, and everything should be the same as it was before once the new string sound is gone.
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
#5
oh no ! the bridge is going to collapse upon itself ! your refridgerator will suddenly start belting out Marty Robbins songs ! Zimbabwe will suddenly become the leader of the free world !
or nothing will happen except you lose a little bass.... move along citizen, there's nothing to see here.
need more gear and a lot more talent(courtesytuxs)
#6
Quote by AgSilver
Hello.
Yesterday I bought a new guitar (Takamine G340S) and I changed the strings.
But after that I noticed that the new strings are 0.10 when the guitar comes with 0.12.
I can only but new strings tomorrow, what should I do in the meantime? Is that really damaging the guitar?
Changing from the "acoustic light" set that came with the guitar, to " acoustic extra light" (which you did), certainly won't hurt the guitar. The extra light set actually stresses the guitar quite a bit less. There's 30lbs less tension in the string set.

However, it can change the guitar's setup.

First, the guitar's neck can become "too straight". In other words there might be "no relief". (There is a shallow dip in the neck @ about the 7th fret). This is designed to prevent string buzzing from the fret above, all the way up the neck. The second thing that can happen is the overall action can become lower.

You might find you like the lower gauge strings. Especially if you want to bend strings as you would on an electric. So, you can watch for these changes to occur, and get the guitar setup, to accommodate the change.

Manufacturers very often choose acoustic light string sets as a general compromise between keeping the guitar together, and good overall volume and bass.

Ibanez ships all their acoustics with D'Addario EXP-16 strings. (A coated acousctic light set, (.012 to .053)
Quote by MarcFlink
NO damage done man You can easily change between gauges, but you'll have to intonate your guitar if you wish to keep strings that are of a different gauge.. As long as you are actually getting the other strings soon anyway, then there is nothing that can happen (it can never damage the guitar to use different string gauges )

Marc
How exactly do you do that, intonate an acoustic guitar? Why would a change in string gauge change the intonation anyway?
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jun 28, 2013,
#7
Quote by Captaincranky

How exactly do you do that, intonate an acoustic guitar? Why would a change in string gauge change the intonation anyway?



1.You change the intonation by compensating the saddle

2. A change in gauge causes different tension, which can throw the intonation slightly off. I think it is more noticeable between brands that have different cores, but even more noticeable when not only jumping gauges, but going between hand wound and machine wound strings. This is caused from the windings not being nearly as consistent as the machine wound strings.

The other issue is really the fact that there is no perfectly tuned string instrument in all keys at the same time(piano included), and this goes all the way back to 1700 with composers first starting to understand "tempered tuning".

EDIT: Note that over the last 20 years and probably 15 acoustics, if not more, I have only had to compensate one saddle, the rest were alleviated with tempered tuning, and knowing how to tune each guitar depending on which key I was playing in.

I also believe that a lot of people don't even realise that this phenomenon exists. I not sure if they just can't hear it or what, but i sure can.
Last edited by Apc3 at Jun 29, 2013,
#8
And I'd wager that you'd be willing to tell me all about it.....

The acoustic guitar saddle is sometimes as narrow as 3/32" of an inch, and the top is rounded.

So, that means you could have a maximum deviation off center 0f 3/64" of an inch. Plus the standard acoustic saddle has a rounded top. So, were you to flatten that, (which you'd have to do before you ground the offset), the intonated string would be lower than it's neighbors.

So, now, you're back at buying a fresh saddle blank, and for the net gain of a maximum of 3/64" of an inch. Have fun.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jun 29, 2013,
#9
LOL....I guess I shouldn't have assumed that when I said to compensate a saddle that you would have to start with a blank. If your first thought was flattening out the saddle for one string, then cutting it back/forth, then you should leave something like this to someone who has a clue to what they are doing. I'm sorry if that seems rude, I just find it really weird that it would even be a thought for that being a way to compensate a saddle, you would HAVE to start new.

Captaincranky, are you suggesting that all acoustic saddles should be straight without any compensating since as you claim, the 3/64 basically does nothing? I can say 100% that a properly made, and yes compensated, saddle has made the all the difference in the world on some acoustics. I guess that all the major guitar manufacturers should stop making compensated saddles since they're useless. Have fun.

Also, no, we're talking about acoustic saddles, the pic of the electric has nothing to do with what I am talking about, besides the fact that once your ears are trained you will realise that there is no perfectly in tune acoustic all the time, this is a fact. The fact that you couldn't understand anything that MarcFlinc stated only shows your ignorance on this subject. Have fun
#10
Quote by Apc3
LOL....I guess I shouldn't have assumed that when I said to compensate a saddle that you would have to start with a blank. If your first thought was flattening out the saddle for one string, then cutting it back/forth, then you should leave something like this to someone who has a clue to what they are doing. I'm sorry if that seems rude, I just find it really weird that it would even be a thought for that being a way to compensate a saddle, you would HAVE to start new.

Captaincranky, are you suggesting that all acoustic saddles should be straight without any compensating since as you claim, the 3/64 basically does nothing? I can say 100% that a properly made, and yes compensated, saddle has made the all the difference in the world on some acoustics. I guess that all the major guitar manufacturers should stop making compensated saddles since they're useless. Have fun.

Also, no, we're talking about acoustic saddles, the pic of the electric has nothing to do with what I am talking about, besides the fact that once your ears are trained you will realise that there is no perfectly in tune acoustic all the time, this is a fact. The fact that you couldn't understand anything that MarcFlinc stated only shows your ignorance on this subject. Have fun
Who the f*** is Marc Flint, and WTF are you talking about?

You're answering a beginner's question with a whole lot of crap about intonating an acoustic, that's about as ignorant as you can get.

The TS doesn't even know whether a different string gauge will hurt his guitar, and you're going to have him grinding saddles.

And yes, I',m quite aware that many acoustic saddles ARE compensated. And I'm also aware that many are as narrow as 3/32", and are UNCOMPENSATED. The Fender "Sonoran" in my living room would be an example of this.

Now can I have the big lecture about true temperament, and all you know about how instruments were tuned hundreds of years ago. That should be one enormous pedantic snooze?

And don't give me some s*** house lecture about what acoustic guitars are about. I've played them for 50 years.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jun 29, 2013,
#11
maybe you should read #6 post in this thread over again. You kinda jumped on "MarcFlink"

These were your exact questions in that post, you asked, so really you started this....here it is....


Captaincranky...How exactly do you do that, intonate an acoustic guitar? Why would a change in string gauge change the intonation anyway?


So, you didn't know, but now all of a sudden you do. Don't ask questions you don't want answers to I guess. I can tell you only want to argue because your posts are quite contradictory to each other and I wasn't trying to lecture anyone and I felt that after the OP had heard the correct advice many times over, I'm sure he got the point.

I'm quoting your stuff so when you sober up and delete it, well....it'll still be here for ya..

Captaincranky..The acoustic guitar saddle is sometimes as narrow as 3/32" of an inch, and the top is rounded.

So, that means you could have a maximum deviation off center 0f 3/64" of an inch. Plus the standard acoustic saddle has a rounded top. So, were you to flatten that, (which you'd have to do before you ground the offset), the intonated string would be lower than it's neighbors.

So, now, you're back at buying a fresh saddle blank, and for the net gain of a maximum of 3/64" of an inch. Have fun.
#12
Quote by Apc3
So, you didn't know, but now all of a sudden you do. Don't ask questions you don't want answers to I guess. I can tell you only want to argue because your posts are quite contradictory to each other and I wasn't trying to lecture anyone and I felt that after the OP had heard the correct advice many times over, I'm sure he got the point.

I'm quoting your stuff so when you sober up and delete it, well....it'll still be here for ya..
No, I asked this in sarcasm:
How exactly do you do that, intonate an acoustic guitar? Why would a change in string gauge change the intonation anyway?
You it seems, are way too dull to figure that out. You can move the intonation on an acoustic, but it many cases it's not enough to matter. As far as setting intonation because of a set gauge change, well, you've been in the bathroom strumming neck #2 to "Metal Head Magazine for far too long.
#13
I can read that over and over and they're not sarcastic questions, unless you are really that dull. Nice try, but I don't think anyone's going to read those 2 questions as you claim. I also stated that tuning slightly different is a way better way to deal with intonation problems.
No Metal Mags. here, but I do hear my guitar and am always listening to it, I guess you probably just use a tuner and think your Fender(lol) acoustic sounds great.............. well it probably does when you only know 3 chords. Have fun
#14
Quote by Apc3
I can read that over and over and they're not sarcastic questions, unless you are really that dull. Nice try, but I don't think anyone's going to read those 2 questions as you claim. I also stated that tuning slightly different is a way better way to deal with intonation problems.
No Metal Mags. here, but I do hear my guitar and am always listening to it, I guess you probably just use a tuner and think your Fender(lol) acoustic sounds great.............. well it probably does when you only know 3 chords. Have fun

Wow, my "have fun" remark really twisted your too tight little panties into a bunch didn't it?

Who writes your material? Oh wait, I do....

As to the Fender sounding good, when you consider the price, it does.

Plus, I know at least 6 chords, and I'm going to go strum mine, and you can continue to strum whatever it is that you've been strumming.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jun 29, 2013,
#15
ooooh..... I get it, just looked at your past comments, I shall come out from beneath the bridge now....ooops
#16
Wow, my "havwe fun" remark really twistede your too tight little panties into a bunch didn'tr.

Who writes you material? Oh wait, I do....



is that baby talk, sure reads like it. Maybe it's supposed to be sarcasm, please do tell. Have fun
#17
Quote by Apc3
is that baby talk, sure reads like it. Maybe it's supposed to be sarcasm, please do tell. Have fun
Well, if you're going to keep stealing it, I shouldn't have to proof read it for you too, should I?

Quote by Apc3
ooooh..... I get it, just looked at your past comments, I shall come out from beneath the bridge now....ooops
So, you're coming out from beneath a bridge? I would have sworn it was a closet.

And please don't forget to skulk over to my profile page, and leave a nice message.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jun 29, 2013,
#18
on another note, we have several guitars here that came with 12s and now have 10s. intonation hasn't been a problem from the cheapest to the most expensive, but we have had to tweak the action on a few and adjust the truss rod on one. some were just fine without doing anything.
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
#19
Quote by patticake
on another note, we have several guitars here that came with 12s and now have 10s. intonation hasn't been a problem from the cheapest to the most expensive, but we have had to tweak the action on a few and adjust the truss rod on one. some were just fine without doing anything.
Well I'm sure if you had been aware of the complete history of equal tempered versus true temperament tuning , and overdosed on Ritalin at the time you were changing strings, it would have. And mattered greatly!

This is the reason I never inject myself with methamphetamine and change the string gauge of a guitar late at night. I know the neighbors are laughing through the walls about the intonation problems I'm about to have, and some fat cat at the guitar company is counting the money he ripped me off for, on a guitar that will never sound quite right, to my now heightened, superhuman, sense of hearing......
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jun 30, 2013,