#1
Hey there fellow ax-men and ax-women. I have a B.C. Rich Deluxe JRV and the G string (ha ha) has an intonation problem. I can't move the saddle out any farther, and it's still incredibly sharp.

It pisses me off because I spent $750 on this guitar. You'd think, that even with the brand in which I bought, it shouldn't have such problems. Now, Intonation is always something that has bothered me about any guitar. It's so bad the power chord is out of tune. It's driving me crazy. So, should I get it set up? I've never been sure how they fix that. If the saddle is already at it's limit, what could they do to fix that?
#2
It could actually be a few things causing the intonation issue. I've been out of the game for a while, but these issues could range from having action that is too high, a worn saddle, an incorrectly placed saddle, or a fret issue.

A more rare circumstance could be a structural flaw on the guitar, however the fact that only one string is showing these signs tells me that isn't likely the case. You can always try taking it to a shop. If you can't fix it on your own, it's better then letting a $750 guitar sit around and you'll know what the exact problem is.
Last edited by Fenderexpx50 at Jun 26, 2013,
#4
Quote by ethan_hanus
Move the saddle the other way.


That will just make it more sharp. You're supposed to lengthen the string if it's sharp.
#6
Quote by ShameofaNation
Do you have an especially high action?


I don't think it's especially high. although, I do like higher action.
#7
If you like a higher action then that could be your problem. I actually just had the same issue because I also like a higher action.

My G string saddle was all the way back and I was still coming out sharp. I lowered the bridge a reasonable amount and it pretty much fixed my problem.

If the action is too high, the distance your string goes from where rests to the fretboard is enough to actually sharpen the note, if that makes sense.
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#8
I tried looking at some pics of that guitar. I can't really tell, but if the bridge is a real floyd, or enough like one, there should be 2 holes to to choose for the screw locking the saddle in place. Try removing the G saddle and see if you have a second screw hole further back and use that.
#9
Quote by Razbo
I tried looking at some pics of that guitar. I can't really tell, but if the bridge is a real floyd, or enough like one, there should be 2 holes to to choose for the screw locking the saddle in place. Try removing the G saddle and see if you have a second screw hole further back and use that.


It's an Original Floyd. There are actually 3 holes for each saddle. But, the third one is useless due to not being enough room. When I mean the saddle is too far back, I mean the saddle is against the back of the bridge. The lip that has the fine tuners on it. It's against that.
#10
Quote by ShameofaNation
If you like a higher action then that could be your problem. I actually just had the same issue because I also like a higher action.

My G string saddle was all the way back and I was still coming out sharp. I lowered the bridge a reasonable amount and it pretty much fixed my problem.

If the action is too high, the distance your string goes from where rests to the fretboard is enough to actually sharpen the note, if that makes sense.


Thank you. I'll have to try that.
#11
Quote by DeathsAlterEgo
It's an Original Floyd. There are actually 3 holes for each saddle. But, the third one is useless due to not being enough room. When I mean the saddle is too far back, I mean the saddle is against the back of the bridge. The lip that has the fine tuners on it. It's against that.


Perplexing. Extra high action could could be a cause as previously stated. I guess also make sure you are using a light touch when fretting the 12th to check intonation. Just enough to make the note, but I'm sure you already knew that.

What gauge strings are you using?

One thing to maybe check is the height of the saddle itself compared to the rest. They are in slightly different heights to allow for compensation with the fretboard radius. Maybe a high one got in there by accident at the factory. There should be numbers or letters on the bottoms, it should be the same as the D. (I've heard of dots as well, not sure what's on each model.)

Interesting as well, in most pics, I've noticed the G saddle is really way back, further even than the bass E saddle. But, I checked reviews, and saw no mention of a problem with this. Hardly anything negative at all.

As a last ditch effort, try moving it all the way forward, then start back again and see if you can find the sweet spot. Maybe it's past that and some harmonic is making your tuner think it's sharp when it's flat. (Seriously running out of ideas here lol)
Last edited by Razbo at Jun 27, 2013,
#12
I use 10-56 gauge strings. I lowered the bridge, quite a bit. It helped a lot. The string is nowhere near as sharp as it was. Although, it's still just a little sharp. But, all seems well. Thank you all for your help.