#1
Hey guys hows it goin. Been a while since I've posted anything here. Have you missed me?

Anyway, saying hi isn't really why I'm here.

You see, come September, I'm gonna be traveling to Europe for a month, and I was hoping that since a good portion of people that I know of here are from there (or at the very least know a bit more about it than I do), I was hoping that some of you could enlighten me on some places that I could check out or things that I could do while I'm there.

Places in Europe I am going to be:

Stockholm, Sweden
Copenhagen, Denmark
Munich, Germany
Rome, Italy
Barcelona, Spain

So yeah. I am going to be doing a fair amount of research into these cities myself, but since I am here and this just occurred to me, any of you have any good suggestions for things that I can do or places that I can see in these cities. Also helpful travel advice is appreciated.

So yeah, all help is appreciated.
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#2
Pretend you're Canadian
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
#3
go to prague and drink




#4
Eastern Europe is cheaper than Western, and especially Scandinavia. In cities like Prague, Budapest, Krakow, Bratislava, you'll get a lot more value for money.

Stay in hostels as much as possible. You will meet more people in the common areas there than you will anywhere else. Hotels and airbnb and such may seem like a nicer option now, but you will regret it.

Whether you are travelling with an Inter-Rail ticket (For some reason I get the impression that these are only available to EU citizens, but completely open to correction on that) or by individual trains, I always felt it was better to travel by night. That way you spend a day in one city, sleep on the train, and you spend the next day in another city. No sightseeing days wasted that way. If you are on an InterRail ticket, you still have to pay a surcharge of about 10euro or so.

You only have 5 stops on your itinerary, so it shouldn't be too bad, if you up the number of destinations, reconsider everything you are bringing. Odds are you are taking too much.

Most of the cities you have chosen are relatively in a north/south line. Barcelona is way out of the way. I assume its your start/end point. Either way, it's a lot of travelling, and you may want to consider changing for another city? Any coastal area in the Balkans would be nice, or maybe Amsterdam (there's alot more there than weed and prostitutes)

All the countries you listed are in the eurozone so you don't need to worry about multiple currencies
#5
how many days will you be in Rome ? However those are the most popular tourist locations worth visiting in Rome :

Colisseum
Roman Forum
Caracalla Baths
Quirinale
Pantheon
Spanish Steps
Trevi Fountain
Piazza Navona
Piazza del Popolo
Villa Borghese
St Peter's Basilica and St.Angel Castle

Places you can avoid without regret :

The Pyramid of Cestius (really dull looking)
The Altar of the Fatherland (you will surely notice it being so big, bright white and in a central position, but I personally think it sucks, it just doesn't match with the other buildings in the area)
Circus Maximus (there's nothing to see there, literally nothing a part from some grass, not even ruins ).

A really nice and not so ''touristy'' place to visit it's a small park called ''giardino degli aranci'', it's on the top of a hill so you have a great view on the city, it's not easy to find it thou, it's a bit ''hidden'' so to speak.

As for nightlife, you cannot go wrong with San Lorenzo and Trastevere (2 neighborhoods full of pubs, clubs, etc and always packed with people, especially tourists).
Last edited by francesco18 at Jun 27, 2013,
#6
Quote by francesco18
how many days will you be in Rome ? However those are the most popular tourist locations worth visiting in Rome :

Colisseum
Roman Forum
Caracalla Baths
Quirinale
Pantheon
Spanish Steps
Trevi Fountain
Piazza Navona
Piazza del Popolo
Villa Borghese
St Peter's Basilica and St.Angel Castle

Places you can avoid without regret :

The Pyramid of Cestius (really dull looking)
The Altar of the Fatherland (you will surely notice it being so big, bright white and in a central position, but I personally think it sucks, it just doesn't match with the other buildings in the area)
Circus Maximus (there's nothing to see there, literally nothing a part from some grass, not even ruins ).

A really nice and not so ''touristy'' place to visit it's a small park called ''giardino degli aranci'', it's on the top of a hill so you have a great view on the city, it's not easy to find it thou, it's a bit ''hidden'' so to speak.

As for nightlife, you cannot go wrong with San Lorenzo and Trastevere (2 neighborhoods full of pubs, clubs, etc and always packed with people, especially tourists).


What this guy said. Rome is a great city, but it's also huge. How much time do you have?
#7
Quote by jimmy_neutron
Eastern Europe is cheaper than Western, and especially Scandinavia. In cities like Prague, Budapest, Krakow, Bratislava, you'll get a lot more value for money.

Stay in hostels as much as possible. You will meet more people in the common areas there than you will anywhere else. Hotels and airbnb and such may seem like a nicer option now, but you will regret it.

Whether you are travelling with an Inter-Rail ticket (For some reason I get the impression that these are only available to EU citizens, but completely open to correction on that) or by individual trains, I always felt it was better to travel by night. That way you spend a day in one city, sleep on the train, and you spend the next day in another city. No sightseeing days wasted that way. If you are on an InterRail ticket, you still have to pay a surcharge of about 10euro or so.

You only have 5 stops on your itinerary, so it shouldn't be too bad, if you up the number of destinations, reconsider everything you are bringing. Odds are you are taking too much.

Most of the cities you have chosen are relatively in a north/south line. Barcelona is way out of the way. I assume its your start/end point. Either way, it's a lot of travelling, and you may want to consider changing for another city? Any coastal area in the Balkans would be nice, or maybe Amsterdam (there's alot more there than weed and prostitutes)

All the countries you listed are in the eurozone so you don't need to worry about multiple currencies

Do people in hostels generally speak english? Both staff and patrons
#8
@jimmy_neutron
Sweden has its own currency btw.
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#9
Quote by sfaune92
@jimmy_neutron
Sweden has its own currency btw.


Yeah you're right, don't know what I got into my head there.

Quote by genghisgandhi
Do people in hostels generally speak english? Both staff and patrons


Depends on where you go. Some countries, like the netherlands, or Scandinavian countries will have an extremely high standard of English, others not so much. 9 times out of ten though, staff and patrons will have enough for you to get by. In some cases, the staff in hostels can be people on extended trips. I've stayed in a hostel in Budapest where the hostel owner was Irish, and one in Krakow where one of the staff was American. That said, I'd never spend time in a country without learning one or two phrases relevant to me checking in or asking for directions and things like that.