#1
I was wondering, if soloing with the tritone sub outside of Jazz, Blues, or Bluegrass, is utilized by any of y'all?

For instance if you were about to solo on, "Mr. Spaceman" by the Byrd's, would you consider imposing a Eb7th (or 9th,11th,or 13th) arpeggio over the A7 in the song during the solo?

Also, I know some people don't use ii-V-I or I-vi-ii-V-I lines when taking a solo, but for those of you who do: which device stated do you find more useful?
( I know it depends on the situation, but if you are able; just try to generalize please: (all genres & subgenres included for this question.) )

Thanks in advance to anyone who replies, these subjects are a little confusing to me & because of this, it will be helpful to see another persons perspective.
#2
You don't really seem to know how tritone subs work. If you play an Eb7 appeggio over an A7, you're essentially playing a A7b5b9 chord. But due to the person comping, your Eb with clash with their E, and it'll sound shit. Tritone subs work because the notes in the 3 and 7 stay the same for both chords, except it is inverted. (3 and 7 are the tones that define the quality of the chord) So if you want to play an Eb7 appeggio, the guy who is comping must also play an Eb7. I have to go, I'll explain more indepth later.

Also tritones subs are not just exclusive to contemporary styles, it was also used in the Western Classical tradition. It was just called something different and also spelt differently.
Last edited by GoldenGuitar at Jun 29, 2013,
#3
Quote by Sti Eci Tehpor
I was wondering, if soloing with the tritone sub outside of Jazz, Blues, or Bluegrass, is utilized by any of y'all?

For instance if you were about to solo on, "Mr. Spaceman" by the Byrd's, would you consider imposing a Eb7th (or 9th,11th,or 13th) arpeggio over the A7 in the song during the solo?

Also, I know some people don't use ii-V-I or I-vi-ii-V-I lines when taking a solo, but for those of you who do: which device stated do you find more useful?
( I know it depends on the situation, but if you are able; just try to generalize please: (all genres & subgenres included for this question.) )

Thanks in advance to anyone who replies, these subjects are a little confusing to me & because of this, it will be helpful to see another persons perspective.


I disagree with the premise of Golden Guitar, and that is, you do seem to understand what a Tritone sub is - however, his explanation is right on, albeit a little terse, and it wouldn't sound terrible as long as the "clash notes were used and understood as "passing" tones. Therefore the E/Eb would be a momentary tension.

I wouldn't use ii V I lines over something that's not ii V I, however, you can use them even in a vi ii V I. You'll find a lot of times, for example that even the ii lines work well over other chords, that aren't a ii, in that progression, but you have to experiment to see what I mean.

I spent a lot of time, using a combination of arp lines, and scalar soloing when I studied with Jimmy Bruno online a few years back when I was getting more interested in Jazz, and he pointed out how any note could be used even what people called "wrong" ones, and he was right. It's not the notes per se, its HOW you play the notes.

Best,

Sean