#1
As the title says, just a yes or no.

According to hwww.scalerator.com, one position for C Dorian is this:



So with that in mind, would this be D Dorian, considering you're just moving up the above position two frets?



Cheers.
#3
No.

EDIT: The reason for me saying no is because it all depends on context.
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Last edited by Sickz at Jun 30, 2013,
#4
As the title says, just a yes or no.

According to hwww.scalerator.com, one position for C Dorian is this:


Maybe

So with that in mind, would this be D Dorian, considering you're just moving up the above position two frets?



Cheers.

Maybe
Last edited by mdc at Jun 30, 2013,
#5
Why not just say they're the second and third position of C Major? Personally, I'd only worry about it being D Dorian if I was playing over a Dmin7 chord.
#6
yes.

to the people who would say no, stop making it complicated. that is how you practice a mode on guitar. composing in one may be a different thing, but that isn't the question.
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#7
Quote by vIsIbleNoIsE
yes.

to the people who would say no, stop making it complicated. that is how you practice a mode on guitar. composing in one may be a different thing, but that isn't the question.


Why not just say that that second one, the "d dorian" one, is actually c major or a minor. Then we wouldn't be making it complicated.

I am just saying, why assume that it's dorian when we have no context. Most likely it's c major or a minor, unless we have context to prove us otherwise.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
Last edited by Sickz at Jun 30, 2013,
#8
Quote by vIsIbleNoIsE
yes.

to the people who would say no, stop making it complicated. that is how you practice a mode on guitar. composing in one may be a different thing, but that isn't the question.


You're suggesting giving 7 different names to the same exact group of notes & call giving the same group only 2 names instead complicated.
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#9
Quote by J-Dawg158
You're suggesting giving 7 different names to the same exact group of notes & call giving the same group only 2 names instead complicated.


whoops, i didn't actually look at the tab. i assumed the notes started and ended on C/D, which is how i practice it. calling these tabs any sort of scale other than major or minor would be kinda weird, i agree.

the key thing is to be aware of your "root" note.
Quote by archerygenious
Jesus Christ since when is the Pit a ****ing courtroom...

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#11
I say that the literal answer to the question is yes. But on the other hand, without a good context, I find it to be a bit of a leap to assume that it's actually Dorian rather than just the second position of C major.

I find it's pretty easy to view music from a major or minor perspective. Most music I come across uses tonality like that. Occasionally Atonality is apparent. And more rarely, I might believe something is better suited to be viewed modally. But that really is an exception for me.
"I agree with Matthew about everything" - Everyone
#12
Yes.

and Yes.

-The tab has the root notes in red. There is no musical context given, the context can be found in the question posed. It's not a trick question it's a very simple one. The answer to both questions are yes.
Si
#14
Quote by 20Tigers
Yes.

and Yes.

-The tab has the root notes in red. There is no musical context given, the context can be found in the question posed. It's not a trick question it's a very simple one. The answer to both questions are yes.


yes...the context is the question...
#16
This is what the major scale looks like across the fretboard.





Until you get familiar with the systems for dividing up this pattern (i.e. CAGED and three note string) into manageable pieces, you need not worry about modes. Once you know how to play the major scale in all keys and in every position, it'll be much to view the scale in a modal context should you so choose.
Last edited by chakab at Jul 1, 2013,
#17
I wouldn't use that chart. A# major is a pretty weird beast that I don't think you should use unless you are comfortable with double sharps. You would use Bb major instead. It's way simpler and it's what most musicians will expect to see.

A# C D D# F G A is super non-diatonic. Bb C D Eb F G A is more appropriate.
"I agree with Matthew about everything" - Everyone
#18
Quote by MattyBoy 1337
I wouldn't use that chart. A# major is a pretty weird beast that I don't think you should use unless you are comfortable with double sharps. You would use Bb major instead. It's way simpler and it's what most musicians will expect to see.

A# B# Cx D# E# Fx Gx A# is super non-diatonic. Bb C D Eb F G A is more appropriate.



Fixed, in bold

Best,

Sean
#19
Quote by MattyBoy 1337
I wouldn't use that chart. A# major is a pretty weird beast that I don't think you should use unless you are comfortable with double sharps. You would use Bb major instead. It's way simpler and it's what most musicians will expect to see.

A# C D D# F G A is super non-diatonic. Bb C D Eb F G A is more appropriate.



The scale generator that I used doesn't do flats. TS started by posting bits and pieces of the B flat major scale. I just wanted to make a point about the major scale pattern spanning the fretboard.

Here's the same diagram in C major to avoid any confusion:

Last edited by chakab at Jul 1, 2013,
#20
Quote by Sean0913
Fixed, in bold

Best,

Sean


lol yeah that's what it should be if it were the actual A# major scale. But I was (at least trying) to make the point that what that image showed wasn't even a proper A# major scale. Maybe I didn't say that. Thanks though
"I agree with Matthew about everything" - Everyone
#21
Quote by MattyBoy 1337
lol yeah that's what it should be if it were the actual A# major scale. But I was (at least trying) to make the point that what that image showed wasn't even a proper A# major scale. Maybe I didn't say that. Thanks though

You did say it.

You specified that the scale listed was non diatonic (in fact super non diatonic ) so the fix created a contradiction. -By fixing the scale the sentence was broken.
Si
#22
Quote by chakab
This is what the major scale looks like across the fretboard.





Until you get familiar with the systems for dividing up this pattern (i.e. CAGED and three note string) into manageable pieces, you need not worry about modes. Once you know how to play the major scale in all keys and in every position, it'll be much to view the scale in a modal context should you so choose.

NO NO NO NO NO NO! BAD CHAKAB!

People need to stop viewing the major scale (or any scale) as a bunch of positions on the fretboard. The CAGED system and 3nps system both inforce this idea that we can merely divide up the fretboard into various positions. What we (as guitar players, as musicians) should be doing is learning the notes of the fretboard, learning the intervals of scales, and then realizing how to fit these concepts to songs/music in general. People should start taking a view of the fretboard as a whole, not as postion 1, 2, 3, etc.
Last edited by crazysam23_Atax at Jul 2, 2013,
#23
Quote by crazysam23_Atax
NO NO NO NO NO NO! BAD CHAKAB!

People need to stop viewing the major scale (or any scale) as a bunch of positions on the fretboard. The CAGED system and 3nps system both inforce this idea that we can merely divide up the fretboard into various positions. What we (as guitar players, as musicians) should be doing is learning the notes of the fretboard, learning the intervals of scales, and then realizing how to fit these concepts to songs/music in general. People should start taking a view of the fretboard as a whole, not as postion 1, 2, 3, etc.

I agree, although I do not do it this way.
#24
Quote by crazysam23_Atax
NO NO NO NO NO NO! BAD CHAKAB!

People need to stop viewing the major scale (or any scale) as a bunch of positions on the fretboard. The CAGED system and 3nps system both inforce this idea that we can merely divide up the fretboard into various positions.


Yeah, that's because you can in fact divide the fretboard up into various positions when you're playing a scale. They make it much easier to memorize and navigate and the giant pattern that you're required to function within when you play the major scale.

What we (as guitar players, as musicians) should be doing is learning the notes of the fretboard, learning the intervals of scales, and then realizing how to fit these concepts to songs/music in general. People should start taking a view of the fretboard as a whole, not as postion 1, 2, 3, etc.


Who says that using CAGED and 3nps and learning intervals, scale degrees, the notes on the fretboard and using said concepts to make music are mutually exclusive? By your logic, we as guitar players shouldn't use moveable closed position chord shapes because that reduces the beautiful harmony of a chord to a worthless pattern or some such nonsense.

I know where all the notes on the fretboard are, but it took a long time for me to get completely comfortable with it. Before I practiced the positional systems extensively, I would freeze and get lost every time that I tried improvise with changes.

CAGED and 3nps provide structure to the jumble of notes that we're presented with on the fretboard. They're also an excellent means to train your fretting hand because knowledge of the fretboard doesn't necessarily translate into the ability to play what notes you want to in a sequence.
#25
Couple of years ago, I considered musicians as useless people but now when I am in the music field I come to know it is very laborious work in which you not only required good voice but skill on the different chords of music instruments. It tell you where to rise the sound and where to slow down. This is actually called rhythm in general term. The question about the samples of modes is very informative. I appreciate your work and say "yes".
#26
Quote by chakab
Yeah, that's because you can in fact divide the fretboard up into various positions when you're playing a scale. They make it much easier to memorize and navigate and the giant pattern that you're required to function within when you play the major scale.
...
...
CAGED and 3nps provide structure to the jumble of notes that we're presented with on the fretboard. They're also an excellent means to train your fretting hand because knowledge of the fretboard doesn't necessarily translate into the ability to play what notes you want to in a sequence.

^Exactly.

The CAGED and 3nps are systems to break down the larger full fretboard pattern into smaller easier to learn chunks. The ultimate goal being to learn, in full, ...wait for it... ...dum dum duuuuum... the full fretboard. Wow, mindblowing stuff right there!!!

They are methods of doing EXACTLY what crazysam suggests one does instead of following these methods.
Si
#27
Quote by MattyBoy 1337
lol yeah that's what it should be if it were the actual A# major scale. But I was (at least trying) to make the point that what that image showed wasn't even a proper A# major scale. Maybe I didn't say that. Thanks though



No you said it fine, I was just having a little fun. Its clear you know your stuff.

Best,

Sean