#4
Well if you really wanna make music out of it, I'd suggest either learning theory and using it to play within the key, or developing your ear to identify notes that don't clash with your backing
#5
Dude I know a bit, but I can't know a key by ear yet.
The point was just to have fun using the Phrygian scale.
#6
Phrygian is not a scale, it's a mode. If you pick a random scale and play it over a backing track, it's not going to work. What you play has to match the backing track. Read up on music theory and try to apply it to what you're playing. Also, STAY AWAY from Modes until you've figured out basic theory (major/minor scales, what a key is, etc.)
#7
Quote by BloodReverence
Phrygian is not a scale, it's a mode. If you pick a random scale and play it over a backing track, it's not going to work. What you play has to match the backing track. Read up on music theory and try to apply it to what you're playing. Also, STAY AWAY from Modes until you've figured out basic theory (major/minor scales, what a key is, etc.)

I KNOW basic theory. I know how chords are made, I know my basic 7m/7M/etc and how extended chords are done too, so as scales. I'm going to learn melodic minor later this year, btw.

What I played is more likely T - b2 - b3 - 4J - 5J - b6 - b7 - 8/T

Which would be G - Ab - Bb - C - Db - Eb - F - G.

Stop acting like you know most things and I'm some noob. I know my basics.
Last edited by TakenBr at Jul 1, 2013,
#8
Then I guess what you need to learn is how to apply it. I'm not trying to be an asshole dude, I'm just trying to suggest ways to improve on what you're doing.

If you don't know the key of the backing track you're playing on, you can't just pick a scale and play it over it. Also, modes are not scales. The Phrygian mode would be used if you had a backing track that resolved to G and used the same notes as G minor but used a b2. If the song you're playing has all the notes of G phrygian, but resolves to something other than G, it's not the Phrygian mode, nor is it in the key of G. Modes are always determined by the harmony, not the melody, and the harmony and melody shouldn't clash.
#10
Dude, sorry but you play out of tempo and random notes - it sounded bad. Before you start soloing, I suggest looking at the chords you are playing over and figuring out what notes fit over them (hint: chord tones always fit over the chords you play - it will never sound bad if you only play chord tones - they are the safest notes you can play over chords). I would also suggest using your ears. Listen to the sounds you are making. Do you like them? If not, figure out what's wrong with them. Learn how different notes sound over different chords.

Don't just pick a random scale and play over a backing track using that scale. Some notes in a scale work better over certain chords. Also the backing track wasn't a phrygian backing track.

Also deleting videos is not a good idea. You'll never learn if you can't listen to other people's critique. Actually listening to parts where your playing sounds awful is a good lesson. You need to figure out why it sounds bad. It's not all about the notes you play, it's also about your phrasing - how you play the notes (what techniques you use). There was really no rhythm in your solo. And that's one thing that makes it sound bad.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

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Yamaha P115
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Jul 6, 2013,
#11
I watched the video, if the backing track was IN F minor and resolved to F minor, ur safest bet would have been F minor. Just forcing a phrygian mode over a backing track like that is never going to sound good. Think of it like this, F minor is F G Ab Bb C Db Eb, the phrygian mode would be C phrygian (C Db Eb F G Ab Bb) (the aeolian or minor mode is the 6th mode the phrygian is the 3rd, the Major in this situation is G#). Playing over a common F minor progression (Say F minor, Bb minor C minor) THE BEST NOTES TO PLAY WOULD BE F Bb and C. Now if u spell out those chords, u will see, Fm-F Ab C, Bbm-Bb Db F, Cm-C Eb G, so REALLY ANY chord tone could work. The sound that is desired from the phrygian mode is based around the half step movement from the root to the b2. So the best chords to play that over would be the C minor and the C# major chord movement (quick hint, for powerchords, it would just be C5 C#5). Anyways, I hope that helps u a bit. (Its also OK to throw in outside notes, as long as they quickly go to a note that IS a chord tone, or allow it to segue into the next chord, thusly going into one of those chord tones (For example, maybe if its Bb minor going into C minor u COULD use Db leading to the C minor chord (Db is the b9 in that case relative to C minor)).
Or alternately u could have VERY SIMPLY soloed over the Fm backing with the Fm pentatonic scale, or the Fm blues scale. Honestly with those scales, u dont have to think that much about the theory, and pretty much any of the notes will sound good.

Basically, study ur modal theory if u want to USE modes, and ALSO, SERIOUSLY LISTEN TO WHAT U PLAY AND STUDY THE PLAYERS U LOVE. Dont focus on the flashy fast licks they play, listen to how they BEND AND PHRASE THEIR LICKS!!!! I SWEAR BENDING and Vibrato are the BIGGEST KEYS to going from an average guitarist to a GREAT guitarist. And all it takes is practice.
Last edited by awesomo41894 at Jul 7, 2013,