#1
to the major/minor scale?
I once hit a man in Dearborn. Michigan. A hit and run. I hit him and just kept on goin. I don't know if he's alive or dead. But I'm sorry. Not a day goes by i don't see his face.
#3
...I don't think so. Considering the minor scale is derived from the major scale.
Quote by Fat Lard
Why would you spend tens of thousands of dollars to learn about a language you already speak? It was over before it even started dude

Quote by captainsnazz
brot pls
#4
Quote by macashmack
What do you mean?


when playing a scale, a certain feel is created. as long as you play the notes specific to that scale the feel is maintained. assuming the resolving note remains constant.

i figure since the major/minor scale is what sounds most coherent, that the description of other scales sound would be based on a relationship to the major/minor scale.

eg: most of us are familiar with the way both a minor scale, and a harmonic minor scale feel. and the harmonic minor scale is just the minor scale with a major 7. would you define the overall feel/vibe/sound of the harmonic minor scale as something independent from the minor scale or more a derivation from it? theyre similar enough to where its easy to take the latter.

but i wonder with more abstract sounding scales if the same can be said. my ears arent sharp enough to draw the connections between scales necessary. i can see the different intervals, hear the difference, and even list differences between a scale and the major/minor scale.

but what i want to know is if those differences are what best describes a scale best. if you are very sensitive to musical feel, does everything sound like it derives from the major/minor scale?


Quote by BladeSlinger
...I don't think so. Considering the minor scale is derived from the major scale.


yea... thats why i keep putting a slash between them. im not sure if treating them as two separate scales serves a purpose to this question. but maybe it does.
I once hit a man in Dearborn. Michigan. A hit and run. I hit him and just kept on goin. I don't know if he's alive or dead. But I'm sorry. Not a day goes by i don't see his face.
Last edited by rabbittroopsux at Jul 2, 2013,
#5
the modes certainly are. i've been learning about jazz improv, and it seems like a common method to teach all of the modes in relation to the major scale (e.g. this scale/mode is a major scale but with a sharp 4).

more abstract scales, maybe like the diminished scale? not so much.
Quote by archerygenious
Jesus Christ since when is the Pit a ****ing courtroom...

Like melodic, black, death, symphonic, and/or avant-garde metal? Want to collaborate? Message me!
#6
The quality is better determined by reference to the key.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#7
Quote by rabbittroopsux
when playing a scale, a certain feel is created. as long as you play the notes specific to that scale the feel is maintained. assuming the resolving note remains constant.

i figure since the major/minor scale is what sounds most coherent, that the description of other scales sound would be based on a relationship to the major/minor scale.

eg: most of us are familiar with the way both a minor scale, and a harmonic minor scale feel. and the harmonic minor scale is just the minor scale with a major 7. would you define the overall feel/vibe/sound of the harmonic minor scale as something independent from the minor scale or more a derivation from it? theyre similar enough to where its easy to take the latter.

but i wonder with more abstract sounding scales if the same can be said. my ears arent sharp enough to draw the connections between scales necessary. i can see the different intervals, hear the difference, and even list differences between a scale and the major/minor scale.

but what i want to know is if those differences are what best describes a scale best. if you are very sensitive to musical feel, does everything sound like it derives from the major/minor scale?



I've trained my ear to hear in movable Do solfeggi, so to me things do sound like they are based off the major and minor keys. However, scales don't lend feeling to me; cadence and intervals do. A minor third (Me, pronounced may, in solfegge) in a major key sounds warm and bluesy, where a major third (Mi in solfeggi) in a minor key sounds circusy. All the other intervals are the same, in that they all have unique characteristics depending on the tonality they are in, whether it be a major sixth (La) in a minor key or a minor seventh (Te, pronounced tay) in a major key, etc.

I don't think in scale sounds, I think in interval and solfeggio sounds.
Last edited by macashmack at Jul 2, 2013,
#8
Quote by rabbittroopsux
to the major/minor scale?


I'd say that its defined by its relationship to the tonal center, and the incidence of half and whole steps, and in some cases, omission of those half and whole step building blocks.

However its generally accepted that the 3rd of a scale helps to define it's major or minor tonality.

Best,

Sean