#1
I've recently got back into playing electric guitar after a couple of years mainly playing acoustic. So I'm resuming building my pedal board.

I notice the Line 6 M5 is much cheaper than it was 2 years ago (discontinued?) and will almost certainly buy one. Quick question: the octave fuzz on it, can you use it as a stand alone fuzz and toggle the octave on/off?

If not that brings me to my second question. What is the advantage of an octave fuzz pedal (i.e. Ultimate Octave) compared to a stand alone fuzz and stand alone octave? Presumably a slight tone difference, but is it really noticeable?

Thanks.
#2
On the M5 there are several different fuzz models, so while you can't toggle the octave on/off on that particular octave fuzz you can select a separate fuzz model and there is also a separate ocatve up setting that can be used.

A stand alone fuzz has a distinct raw roar, listen to any fuzz demos and you'll know what I'm talking about. A stand alone octave gives a clean perfect octave up/down effect, listen to a Electro Harmonix POG2 demo and you'll hear this.

A octave fuzz pedal is a very strong mix of the two. The octave up effect of the octave fuzz isn't perfect and reacts best above the 12th fret on the neck pickup. The octave fuzz is a very weird pedal and has a really ripping character. Listen to a demo of a Roger Mayer Octavia or a Tycobrahe Octavia to hear this effect.
#3
I'm selling an M9 of that's of any interest for you???
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#4
Quote by R_Gallagher_Fan
On the M5 there are several different fuzz models, so while you can't toggle the octave on/off on that particular octave fuzz you can select a separate fuzz model and there is also a separate ocatve up setting that can be used.

A stand alone fuzz has a distinct raw roar, listen to any fuzz demos and you'll know what I'm talking about. A stand alone octave gives a clean perfect octave up/down effect, listen to a Electro Harmonix POG2 demo and you'll hear this.

A octave fuzz pedal is a very strong mix of the two. The octave up effect of the octave fuzz isn't perfect and reacts best above the 12th fret on the neck pickup. The octave fuzz is a very weird pedal and has a really ripping character. Listen to a demo of a Roger Mayer Octavia or a Tycobrahe Octavia to hear this effect.


This, afaik, octave fuzzes often work by the nature of the fuzz emphasizing certain higher harmonics much more than usual, creating the octave effect. I don't know if this is true for all of them, especially more recently, but with older pedals that's what i was told was the reason for them reacting to different notes differently above the 12th fret for instance.

Since any note on any instrument has more than just the fundamental frequency, the fundamental of a low E is 82hz, but the 164hz frequency which is one octave higher will be present in the signal too, and so on in gradually diminishing numbers.
164hz is still quite low and often on guitar, this second harmonic comes through quite loudly compared to the 82hz fundamental , as the fundamental frequency of a note is not always the loudest frequency that is heard.
If you play the 12th fret of the low E string, it would be typical for 328hz to be quite loud too compared to the fundamental of 164hz.

Now, all i've talked about here is not touching properly upon even order and odd order harmonics within the note. There are more frequencies than just the octaves present in a note and these are also amplified by distorting the signal due to the nature of distortion.

Fuzz is a type of distortion to the signal, and any distortion is adding a more harmonic content to the signal (this is also the reason full chords can sound messy with high amounts of distortion, due to the higher amplification of additional harmonics of the notes within the chords which can often create dissonance)


You can see it on this example of a note on a flute.