#1
I am curious, how often do you, reader, listen to a band's entire discography?

Most of the time I see recommendations an album is picked from a band's corpus, or whenever there is discuss it seems to revolve around a few essentials or some new band's smaller body of work. Let's say for example, Candlemass. They are a phenomenal band, and most of us tend to say that they have not released a bad album, but the discuss invariably moves towards the key releases (Epicus, Nightfall, etc.) Do you think picking and choosing mentality is a product of our modern society and our listening habits? You can now go on a number of media sites and listen to that one song you want, or you can even pay a dollar and buy that one song you want.

What are your thoughts on this new form of sharing music with the world? Do you think it is less personal? Are bands less meaningful sentimentally because most of us don't own every single album a band has released? Most of the time I find myself listening to that one album that is heralded as great, instead of listening through the band's discography. Perhaps the problem is, at least for me, we try to listen to too much music at onc,e and there is only so much time we can devote to listening, so we choose the creme de la creme so to speak.

How many bands can you claim to have listened to all of their work and appreciate the band's evolution across ten, twenty years?
Quote by Senor Kristian
Viking fact no. 1: Viking helmets did not have horn.
Viking fact no. 2: Vikings tobogganed on their shields into battle.
Viking fact no. 3: Vikings drank mead.
Viking fact no. 4: One of your ancestors are likely to have been raped by a viking.
Last edited by The Virtuoso at Jul 2, 2013,
#2
Quote by The Virtuoso
I am curious, how often do you, reader, listen to a band's entire discography?

Most of the time I see recommendations an album is picked from a band's corpus, or whenever there is discuss it seems to revolve around a few essentials or some new band's smaller body of work. Let's say for example, Candlemass. They are a phenomenal band, and most of us tend to say that they have not released a bad album, but the discuss invariably moves towards the key releases (Epicus, Nightfall, etc.) Do you think picking and choosing mentality is a product of our modern society and our listening habits? You can now go on a number of media sites and listen to that one song you want, or you can even pay a dollar and buy that one song you want.

What are your thoughts on this new form of sharing music with the world? Do you think it is less personal? Are bands less meaningful sentimentally because most of us don't own every single album a band has released? Most of the time I find myself listening to that one album that is heralded as great, instead of listening through the band's discography. Perhaps the problem is, at least for me, we try to listen to too much music at onc,e and there is only so much time we can devote to listening, so we choose the creme de la creme so to speak.

How many bands can you claim to have listened to all of their work and appreciate the band's evolution across ten, twenty years?


This for me as well. Too lazy to answer the rest.
#3
^ This is exactly what I mean! I don't like to make huge sociological or psychological remarks on human nature, because I feel like most if not all are dubious at best; however, I think we are definitely influenced by the fast paced consumer society where most of us reside. It is all instant gratification. Masturbation instead of more strenuous activities, which involve interpersonal relationships. We sit at home with our high speed internet connections and jump from pleasure to pleasure, instead of taking the time to slow down and enjoy something.
Quote by Senor Kristian
Viking fact no. 1: Viking helmets did not have horn.
Viking fact no. 2: Vikings tobogganed on their shields into battle.
Viking fact no. 3: Vikings drank mead.
Viking fact no. 4: One of your ancestors are likely to have been raped by a viking.
#4
The time factor is an obvious reason, but there really aren't many, or should I say any, bands that have an extensive discography which I listen to completely. Plenty of bands with discographies consisting of, say 4 to 5 albums, that I listen to regularly, but almost never from start to finish, because I listen to what I'm in the mood for, and I assume that within so many albums there's more than just 1 mood. I would probably hope there would be anyway. And well, there's often that one album in there that gets a lot less plays than the others.

I don't personally see the need to have bands' full discographies really, since I prefer to let albums stay as individual pieces of work instead of thinking too much about them as a body of work. I just basically go for the albums that actually tickle my fancy. Not to say there haven't been a couple of exceptions when I've gotten an album mostly just to have them all.
#5
Compared to the amount of albums I own, I'd say I don't delve into the band's entire discography very often. Less than ten bands, probably. But there are some bands that only have a couple of albums that I don't like or own.

I think there are generally two kinds of people: those who like listening to full albums/discographies with all their flaws; and those who are not as interested in those and instead like individual songs. Obviously I'm simplifying things a lot, but I think you get the idea. A lot of us are probably both to some extent. I think the ability to pick and choose which songs to get hasn't changed the way people listen all that much. The way I see it, those people who like to pick and choose might not have been interested in albums anyway, and so more people listen to music in general.

If you've ever taken an economic class, you probably heard about the "niche" concept. I can't remember exact terms, but it's basically the idea that the more variety of products you offer, the more customers you'll get because you have "something for everyone," so to speak. So it's possible that the ability to pick individual songs is a "bad" habit that's a product of our modern society, but I think another explanation is that it's a perfectly valid form of consumption that allows music to be brought to a broader audience.

I'm an album guy myself; I prefer to listen to a whole album with a couple bad songs or elements than to just pick out the hits. But I don't think picking and choosing is necessarily bad, either. It's probably less personal, yes. Listening to a whole album gives you more insight into a songwriter's mind/life than just one song off the album. But I'm not sure that owning a whole discography was ever something that most people did. I could be wrong; I'm fairly young. I'm sure you could argue that bands do hold less sentimental value nowadays because a lot of people don't own every album. But really, most bands have some pretty bad albums. There are very few bands who have complete discographies that are worthwhile, IMO. Which is possibly because the amount of bands around these days is so much higher than what it used to be.

Music in general has seen a trend going from being carefully crafted (only) by record companies to individual artists working out of their bedrooms or personal studios (Not to say that nobody releases through a record company anymore, of course). There's so much more music, which means a lot of it is going to be mediocre, and a lot more people are listening because of the way people can consume/purchase it.

It's complicated to try to figure stuff like this out, but it's interesting. I think you're right though; we try to listen to too much at once.
#6
Until the dawn of the internet owning a discography was bordering on the realm of collectors for bands with a bit of history. I suppose it's even more that way now if we're talking about physical copies, but I'll never understand people who download entire discographies at once. Maybe I underestimate people but I'm not sure how you can ever get such large volumes digested properly.
Quote by justinb904
im more of a social godzilla than chameleon

Quote by MetalMessiah665
Alright, I'll give them a try, Japanese Black Speed rarely disappoints.

Quote by azzemojo
Hmm judging from your pic you'd fit in more with a fat busted tribute.
#7
Quote by duncang
Maybe I underestimate people but I'm not sure how you can ever get such large volumes digested properly.
Nah you're right, you can't really, unless you're super-determined to take the time to get familiar with each album, it's likely gonna roll as mindless background music whilst browsing the interwebs. Then you might pick an album or two out of those and actually give them a listen.
#8
I tend to start delving into a band's discography once I've really got to know the album(s) I already have. Envitably, those are the ones I see mentioned most if it's an older artist, sometimes a huge back catalogue can be pretty off-putting if you're not sure about the quality of it whereas it's not so much of an investment to look up a couple more releases from a newer artist. When it comes to buying physically, there's just no way I can afford to pick up most of a more established artists discography unless it's someone you see lying about the second-hand shops (hurray for Sabbath and Rush).
Quote by ChemicalFire
The point of underground bands is their not popular or famous most of the time. Thus there is a good chance they suck.
#9
The only bands I've gotten that deep into are The Beatles, Iron Maiden, The Eagles, Led Zeppelin, and Cage the Elephant (though they only have two albums). Right now I'm getting into Frank Zappa, but that's a journey in itself...
#10
I actually kinda lose touch with bands whose discography I can't get into completely. Say a band has a first good couple of albums but I don't dig their next three albums, it's just problematic for me to be a "fan" of something that isn't representative of only the parts I am actually a fan of. I mean, I have no problem with treating each album as an individual work of art, which is what I often have to do anyway, but it's more fulfilling for me to listen to a band which I am in agreement with their entire discography. A few of these bands, for me, are: Edguy, Summoning, Lizzy Borden, Avantasia, Heavenly. I am currently building up a physical collection of their discographies as often as fundings allow. I know for a fact I have listened to the Lizzy Borden and Edguy discographies in single sittings.
Who are you? The prince of darkness? Don't you have any friends?


#11
I once listened to Megadeth's discography in chronological order while doing some pretty repetitive computer work at my one internship a couple years ago, mostly as background noise. Yeah, didn't gain much out of that.

I tend to become familiar with one or two albums from a given band, then move on. I'll come back to that band later whenever the mood strikes me and try another album, and so on. I always listen to music as albums, not songs, but rarely listen to two albums from the same band one after the other.

Something else that I notice I tend to do when giving a band a serious listen for the first time is simply pick the album that has the most appealing cover art to me, unless I was specifically recommended an album or browsed some reviews. Like the first Summoning album I ever listened to was Minas Morgul because I recognized the name from LOTR and thought the cover looked the coolest. Cover art also colors my perception and mental imagery I get when listening to music quite a bit, and with black, stoner, and doom metal more than other genres, but that's a whole other realm of discussion.
last.fm
"the waves have now a redder glow..."
#12
I have a lot of free time, but it's still a daunting task to soak in just one full album in one go. I like a lot of music, but most that is on my computer doesn't get a fair shake, while the albums that I enjoy the most and affect me more than any others can get constant play-throughs. I think it has to do with people having the urge to find new music, and when they find it they have to acquire it and some way, so they build up massive digital libraries of music, despite not having given it much attention. It's almost like a hoarder mentality.
#13
Quote by duncang
Until the dawn of the internet owning a discography was bordering on the realm of collectors for bands with a bit of history. I suppose it's even more that way now if we're talking about physical copies, but I'll never understand people who download entire discographies at once. Maybe I underestimate people but I'm not sure how you can ever get such large volumes digested properly.

I learned this lesson the hard way when going through various metal subgenre phases. I ended up with several discographies and not enough interest to delve into any of it. The media overload meant I need had enough time to truly absorb any of it.

I think I still have hundreds of melodeath, power metal, doom metal, etc, albums on an external drive somewhere. Just no desire to listen to it.
#14
Quote by Morphogenesis26
I have a lot of free time, but it's still a daunting task to soak in just one full album in one go. I like a lot of music, but most that is on my computer doesn't get a fair shake, while the albums that I enjoy the most and affect me more than any others can get constant play-throughs. I think it has to do with people having the urge to find new music, and when they find it they have to acquire it and some way, so they build up massive digital libraries of music, despite not having given it much attention. It's almost like a hoarder mentality.



Hoarding is a very apt description of myself, and I agree with a lot of what you said. I am constantly searching for new music, because I want to dip my hand into each scene so I can be knowledgeable about it. Whether it's the hardcore punk scene of the seventies and eighties, the Russian folk/black metal scene, or the recent surge in one man black metal projects from Germany. I want to have something from everywhere, and a lot of times I end up just collecting albums, and I listen to the stuff I already know and like.

I guess I'm thinking back to when I was 15 and I didn't have a computer to download a lot of music. I would go to the store and buy one cd, and I would put it in my portable walkman and listen to it everyday for weeks. I would learn everything about that album. I could recite the lyrics by heart. I had studied the album art, and memorized who was involved in the making of the record. I can still remember sitting on my bed reading the lyrics to At The Heart of Winter and falling asleep to the album.

Now, I see some one mention an interesting band I have not listened to and I try to hunt it down online. I listen to it, but I don't read the lyrics most of the time, because I would have to sit there with my laptop reading the lyrics on MA or some similar site while I listen to the album, and it's difficult to just sit there with a laptop and listen to music without browsing. At least for me, I feel like I have a lot of half digested albums that become background noise (as one of you aptly mentioned) instead of staying with me like some of the physical albums I owned in my younger years, and that I used to spin constantly. Now, if something doesn't resonate with me immediately, then I usually forget about it, even if the album would grow on me with multiple listens. I've pretty much resorted to really listening to music in the ten to twenty minutes of driving I do alone everyday, because that's the only time I can really blast something and get lost in it. This is what I did with Radiohead's discography, Muse, The Mars Volta, and recently, Procession; however, I dislike this method because a lot of times I have to stop a song in the middle and interrupt the flow of an album because I've arrived at my destination (which is usually work), and I don't think I could explain to my boss that I had to finishing listening to the next twenty minutes of the song because you can't have half-measures.

I think it's also that I'm at work from 8-5 and I can't listen to music. Then I go visit my mother from 5-8 and I usually go practice guitar instead of sitting in my old room with a laptop. Then I go home and my gf wants to actually interact with me, or at least have me do something more productive than lie down in bed and try to soak in an album. I guess I'm just a little sad that I don't have the time or sometimes the will to really listen to an album over and over again. Most of the time I just jump from song to song.
Quote by Senor Kristian
Viking fact no. 1: Viking helmets did not have horn.
Viking fact no. 2: Vikings tobogganed on their shields into battle.
Viking fact no. 3: Vikings drank mead.
Viking fact no. 4: One of your ancestors are likely to have been raped by a viking.
Last edited by The Virtuoso at Jul 3, 2013,
#15
I can relate to that pretty strongly. At least especially the part about how it used to be. At some point it seems to turn on it's head and you notice you have too many albums that you haven't properly digested, and too little time to do so. I'm glad I didn't go far with trying to force myself to get into genres I didn't really listen to anyway, so I don't have TOO much stuff I never listen to even today. Then again that has led to me being pretty ignorant with most genres, but why should I know them all?

I actually think I've done a relatively good job keeping up with the stuff I've acquired, and the fact that my last.fm library only has plays from 227 artists kinda shows that I've managed to keep things somewhat "in control" sort of speak. By the numbers I've seen people have there, it's pretty safe to say that's a low amount.
#16
I used to have a lot of the problems that people describe with paying proper attention to music - listening to music in the background, listening to music a song at a time, acquiring a lot of different things but never really paying attention. Ever since I started listening to a lot of 'classical' music though, my listening habits seem to have subconsciously altered themselves without me really thinking about. In attempting to listen to a single symphony by Mahler, which can last two or three times the length of an average metal album, and contain a much lesser degree of repetition and a much more expanded sense of formal organisation, it's impossible to get anywhere near the full effect by listening in the background, and unless you're listening to Lieder, listening one song at a time is impossible

Subconsciously the listening habits I apply to classical music seem to have spilled over into everything else though. No idea why. Nowadays I only listen to albums in full, never in the background, usually when I have some time in the evening and I really feel like it. Never an entire bands discography though, unless that band happens to be Demilich. I don't feel there are any bands whose complete discography is 'flawless' enough for the whole thing to be worth acquiring unless they're a one or two/album band, or a demo-only band or similar.
.
#17
Quote by duncang
Until the dawn of the internet owning a discography was bordering on the realm of collectors for bands with a bit of history. I suppose it's even more that way now if we're talking about physical copies, but I'll never understand people who download entire discographies at once. Maybe I underestimate people but I'm not sure how you can ever get such large volumes digested properly.


I do this. I listen to various songs from various albums to see if I like the artist. If I see any sort of potential I go and download everything they have ever produced. I do this for 5 or 6 bands at a time. I will then spend days and days listening to nothing but all the new music from new artists. My i-pod only holds 8 gigs so it works out nicely. After a week or so of straight listening I have figured out what I want to keep hearing and what I made a mistake (wasted bandwidth) downloading. Over time I properly hear and learn to love each individual artist and album.

Other bands get pushed to the 'well lets see if I like this later' section and are removed from my library. It is that simple.
“The good thing about science is that it's true whether or not you believe in it.” ― Neil deGrasse Tyson

Quote by lolmnt
PC police strike again


If you have a computer related question, ask here!

Official Mayor of the Computer Thread
#18
Quote by Sanitarium91
My last.fm library only has plays from 227 artists kinda shows that I've managed to keep things somewhat "in control" sort of speak. By the numbers I've seen people have there, it's pretty safe to say that's a low amount.


I'm on 1460 and I cleared my history August 2010...
Quote by ChemicalFire
The point of underground bands is their not popular or famous most of the time. Thus there is a good chance they suck.
#19
Quote by eazy-c
I'm on 1460 and I cleared my history August 2010...


I lost an awesome amount of plays over the years revamping my computer. At one point I had listened to a 16min song over 1500 times.
“The good thing about science is that it's true whether or not you believe in it.” ― Neil deGrasse Tyson

Quote by lolmnt
PC police strike again


If you have a computer related question, ask here!

Official Mayor of the Computer Thread
#20
Quote by DamienEx1021
At one point I had listened to a 16min song over 1500 times.
That's fucked up man. That's 400 hours of listening to one song.
#21
Quote by The Virtuoso
Hoarding is a very apt description of myself, and I agree with a lot of what you said. I am constantly searching for new music, because I want to dip my hand into each scene so I can be knowledgeable about it. Whether it's the hardcore punk scene of the seventies and eighties, the Russian folk/black metal scene, or the recent surge in one man black metal projects from Germany. I want to have something from everywhere, and a lot of times I end up just collecting albums, and I listen to the stuff I already know and like.


This is how I was for a long time. Once I realized that I had about 40 gigabytes of music on my computer that I hardly listened to, I knew it was time to take a look at what I already had. It's hard, though, since there are so many different types of unique music out there from Trip-Hop to Canadian Black Metal to Dark Cabaret to Midwestern Emo to Italian Screamo to Martial Industrial to Neo-Folk and so on and so on. It's, like, there all these different sounds that I love, and want to know more about, but who has the time to fully ingest it all? I'm trying to get through what I have right now, and just getting through all the Black Metal albums is amazing and horrifying at the same time. Currently on Ras Algethi's Oneiricon - The White Hypnotic.

I guess I'm thinking back to when I was 15 and I didn't have a computer to download a lot of music. I would go to the store and buy one cd, and I would put it in my portable walkman and listen to it everyday for weeks. I would learn everything about that album. I could recite the lyrics by heart. I had studied the album art, and memorized who was involved in the making of the record. I can still remember sitting on my bed reading the lyrics to At The Heart of Winter and falling asleep to the album.


Ah, I know how that is, although, I didn't buy CD's often. I would still find something on the radio or as a suggestion and learn everything about the song/album/band members. Now, and like you said, I'm lucky to even get past reading the lyrics.

Now, I see some one mention an interesting band I have not listened to and I try to hunt it down online. I listen to it, but I don't read the lyrics most of the time, because I would have to sit there with my laptop reading the lyrics on MA or some similar site while I listen to the album, and it's difficult to just sit there with a laptop and listen to music without browsing. At least for me, I feel like I have a lot of half digested albums that become background noise (as one of you aptly mentioned) instead of staying with me like some of the physical albums I owned in my younger years, and that I used to spin constantly. Now, if something doesn't resonate with me immediately, then I usually forget about it, even if the album would grow on me with multiple listens. I've pretty much resorted to really listening to music in the ten to twenty minutes of driving I do alone everyday, because that's the only time I can really blast something and get lost in it. This is what I did with Radiohead's discography, Muse, The Mars Volta, and recently, Procession; however, I dislike this method because a lot of times I have to stop a song in the middle and interrupt the flow of an album because I've arrived at my destination (which is usually work), and I don't think I could explain to my boss that I had to finishing listening to the next twenty minutes of the song because you can't have half-measures.


Definitely agree with the point on listening to albums on your computer and not browsing at the same time. I'm trying to get myself to hone in on the music when I listen and not let myself go on an internet journey, like so many times before.

Since I've been able to drive, I'm doing that more as well, but it still doesn't give the same effect as when I'm just laying down listening to an album straight and taking it in with absolutely no distractions.

Then I go home and my gf wants to actually interact with me, or at least have me do something more productive than lie down in bed and try to soak in an album.


You could lie down and soak up an album together, along with some other things.
#22
Quote by Sanitarium91
That's fucked up man. That's 400 hours of listening to one song.


395h 50m, the song is 15m 50s long.

There have been times I have had upwards of 2-3000 plays on a single song.
“The good thing about science is that it's true whether or not you believe in it.” ― Neil deGrasse Tyson

Quote by lolmnt
PC police strike again


If you have a computer related question, ask here!

Official Mayor of the Computer Thread
#23
Quote by DamienEx1021
I lost an awesome amount of plays over the years revamping my computer. At one point I had listened to a 16min song over 1500 times.


Are you one of those people that listen to one song on loop forever?
All I want is for everyone to go to hell...
...It's the last place I was seen before I lost myself



Quote by DisarmGoliath
You can be the deputy llamma of the recordings forum!
#24
Quote by ChemicalFire
Are you one of those people that listen to one song on loop forever?


Not in the presence of other people. That is just rude. But if I come across a song that I am in love with I can listen to it for days at a time. It helps me remember the song better since I have serious attention problems.
“The good thing about science is that it's true whether or not you believe in it.” ― Neil deGrasse Tyson

Quote by lolmnt
PC police strike again


If you have a computer related question, ask here!

Official Mayor of the Computer Thread
#25
Quote by ChemicalFire
Are you one of those people that listen to one song on loop forever?


My friend did that on a 6 hour road trip with Free Bird. >_>

Crazy people.
#26
Oh god I can not do it on a road trip. The road is repetitive enough, hearing and seeing the same shit over and over again is worse. I can really only do it when I am at home and using it as background noise. Driving back and fourth between work isn't an issue either as its only 20min.
“The good thing about science is that it's true whether or not you believe in it.” ― Neil deGrasse Tyson

Quote by lolmnt
PC police strike again


If you have a computer related question, ask here!

Official Mayor of the Computer Thread
#27
I don't get people that do that, I can listen to a song on repeat maybe 3 times before I have to change it. I can listen to an album on repeat, but that's not listening to the same song constantly.
All I want is for everyone to go to hell...
...It's the last place I was seen before I lost myself



Quote by DisarmGoliath
You can be the deputy llamma of the recordings forum!
Last edited by ChemicalFire at Jul 4, 2013,
#28
Quote by ChemicalFire
I don't get people that do that, I can listen to a song on repeat maybe 3 times before I have to change it.


Not going to lie... it takes a special kind of crazy. I can also sit down and play the same video game for 12 hours in a row with no issues.
“The good thing about science is that it's true whether or not you believe in it.” ― Neil deGrasse Tyson

Quote by lolmnt
PC police strike again


If you have a computer related question, ask here!

Official Mayor of the Computer Thread
#29
I refer a bands discography to my mood. It's cool that they have incorporated for us their own moods, stories, emotions and naturally their evolution as well in their works -- throughout the CD/Album or entire career as far as their evolution goes. However in most cases, while working or in any other casual setting -- I prefer top hits or cool sounding inspirational tunes, but overall their evolution is always back in my mind I guess too. Thanks for asking and bringing it up, good topic.
Metalmarcs
#30
I work a 12 hour shift and am allowed headphones so I actually listen through a few discographies every work day. It's pretty much the only reason I still work there.
#31
Quote by goest
I work a 12 hour shift and am allowed headphones so I actually listen through a few discographies every work day. It's pretty much the only reason I still work there.


I get to do that while i do the book keeping. Only 2-3 hours at a time but still. Jamming while everyone else has to deal with crazy customers.
“The good thing about science is that it's true whether or not you believe in it.” ― Neil deGrasse Tyson

Quote by lolmnt
PC police strike again


If you have a computer related question, ask here!

Official Mayor of the Computer Thread
#32
How about the listening habits of the Hungarian people during their national depression.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gloomy_Sunday

Quote by Stranglehold
He swallowed black nail polish and shat the word 'motherfucker' onto a non-metal kid. Rad.

Quote by severed-metal
You can dress a woman slutty, but she's not a slut. Understand?

living inside a drop only to die in an ocean
#33
For me, it depends on the band/artist and how the critics liked/disliked the album.
#34
Quote by The Virtuoso
I am curious, how often do you, reader, listen to a band's entire discography?

Most of the time I see recommendations an album is picked from a band's corpus, or whenever there is discuss it seems to revolve around a few essentials or some new band's smaller body of work. Let's say for example, Candlemass. They are a phenomenal band, and most of us tend to say that they have not released a bad album, but the discuss invariably moves towards the key releases (Epicus, Nightfall, etc.) Do you think picking and choosing mentality is a product of our modern society and our listening habits? You can now go on a number of media sites and listen to that one song you want, or you can even pay a dollar and buy that one song you want.

What are your thoughts on this new form of sharing music with the world? Do you think it is less personal? Are bands less meaningful sentimentally because most of us don't own every single album a band has released? Most of the time I find myself listening to that one album that is heralded as great, instead of listening through the band's discography. Perhaps the problem is, at least for me, we try to listen to too much music at onc,e and there is only so much time we can devote to listening, so we choose the creme de la creme so to speak.

How many bands can you claim to have listened to all of their work and appreciate the band's evolution across ten, twenty years?


I'd certainly agree with the point of listening to "too much at once". Somewhat a double edged sword there - if you've heard a lot of different music already, new albums are a bit easier to absorb, but smaller changes get missed. Typically, appreciation of something comes over time. My own listening habits have varied, but I attempt to hear the entire discographies including demo releases, purely because experience taught me some of the best material of any given band occasionally appears on there. And also because it's interesting to see how far some bands have come from their beginnings.

“Who are you then?.."
"- I am part of that power which eternally wills evil and eternally works good.”
KULTURKAMPF
lastFM
#36
I just scan over all the songs in a bands discography and add the best ones to a playlist of my favourite songs.

The majority of bands out there produce heaps of shit with the occasional decent track hidden in them.
Metal Forum Popular Vote Winner!!!

Quote by webbtje
Quote by dead-fish
And you're obviously here because you fancy Phill.
Phill is a very attractive guy...

"I'm so tempted to sig that, Phill" - Sig it then

Unless otherwise stated, assume everything I say is in my opinion.