#1
So, I was listening to some of my recordings, and compared it too recordings of other musicians, and found I strum way too loud. Like, I find it annoying when I have to sing louder to hear the words of the song after recording, haven't been able to record in weeks because of this.

Any ideas on this?

Also, I use dunlop(spelling?) 1mm picks, because I for some reason have never been able to finger pick, even though most of my music would sound a lot better with finger picking. Any ideas on how to get better at finger picking?

Thanks.
#2
Are you comparing your recordings to those of professionals? First of all, you need to realize that recording takes time to learn. It's not something that you just pick up overnight and become an expert at. You're going to need to lower the volume of you guitar in the mix. Obviously, it's way too hot. Remember, you only have so much bandwidth to play with - the sum of all the instruments should be at, or below the 0dB mark on your master channel. Do continue listening to professional recordings, though - listen to how the instruments sit in the mix with the other instruments and the vocalist. You're probably also recording the guitar using its full spectrum. As you mix in more instruments, each instrument needs to have it's own space in the mix.

Finger picking comes with nothing but practice. Not trying to make you mad, but it took me about two weeks of practice to get to the point where I was fairly proficient with finger picking. Spend a little time each day working on it and you'll get it.
#3
Well, was going to try the recording part just now, got everything set up, then when I was getting the my electric guitar ready(first time using it on recording), I forgot to check the strap. Now I have a broken guitar, and I don't think it is repairable since the headstock thing snapped off, and I think parts fell all over Second thing of mine to break this week(yesterday my laptop died).

Think my parents are mad, and my brother probably thinks I'm an idiot.
#4
Well, sorry to hear that. The guitar may be repairable, even if the headstock snapped off. If it's a cheaper guitar, it won't be cost effective to take it to a luthier, but you might be able to have your Dad fix it, if he's handy with glue and tools. It won't be pretty, but it might be repairable.

Don't worry about your brother... they think that regardless - trust me... been there and done that.
#6
If it's cost effective and if the manufacturer provides this service, you can send it to them to have it repaired. You will probably be better off doing this than giving it to some person you may or may not know and pay for who knows what kind of quality. What kind of guitar was it?
#7
Quote by socrfb
If it's cost effective and if the manufacturer provides this service, you can send it to them to have it repaired. You will probably be better off doing this than giving it to some person you may or may not know and pay for who knows what kind of quality. What kind of guitar was it?


It was an epiphone special II... I think. But the shop that is going to look at it is very nice and has helped me a lot. If it costs as much as I think it will, then I will probably just look for a used guitar, and keep the broken one for parts or something.