#1
Hey guys,

I stalk these forums for a quite some years now, but I never felt the need to create an account and ask stuff directly to you - now I think the time has finally come.

I have two questions about oils - and please, don't go nuts over me (specially the one concerning the guitar.), I was inexperienced and I screwed up. I'm willing to fix these in future, with these questions.

Ok, first and simpler question:

I ordered an Ibanez SR305-RBM Bass. It's very hard to find one of these where I live (even if it's an introductory bass guitar), so I asked one of my parents to bring one to me.
I would like some help in which products to get to keep it tidy, clean and well oiled. I made some mistakes with my guitar (more below), and I'd like to avoid screwing it up again.

Please notice I don't have access to most famous brands around here, so, I'd love to get some directions on which kind of products to get (hopefully how to use them, if there's any trick to it other than oiling the strings/neck).

---

Second and trickier question:

I have a Jackson DX10D from 2006. I love it and I take a lot of care - to the best of my knowledge at least

You can see it here:
dropbox.com/s/v7xcwq5t5hcilom/2012-06-04_03-27-30_HDR.jpg
dropbox.com/s/0ohboqx43o84tge/2012-06-04_03-31-36_HDR.jpg

Back then, I could only get information around here (where I live), and all sorts of myths and wrong information was given to me.
One guy (which was a guitar professor >.> recommended me to use silicone (apparently those who were used around here in car panels) on strings.
Other guy told me to use valve oil (those used in metal blow instruments), which has petroleum derivatives ;/
I think I used the valve oil for a very short while, but I ended up using an oil that might be even worse: Airplane Engine Oil. I have no idea of the brand of it or the exact compounds, I only know it's extra thin, lightweight and very well refined. Apparently it's abrasive too (someone told me 2 weeks ago). The chance of having a high amount of petroleum derivatives is huge. I got this oil back then, when I worked in an airlines company, around 2005-2006. I received complaints about the strong smell of this oil also (my mother and my girlfriend complained about it), but I thought it was negligible if it was to keep my guitar protected

I have no idea of how much damage this has done to my guitar, but luckily (I guess?) I don't oil it up as much as I should (I've stopped playing for a long while, while my RL was very busy (and money was a big issue)).

The question is: Any advice on what should I do from now on?
Use the same product that I'll use on Bass (after someone suggests a good one and that I can find) from now on, or keep using this same oil ?

Thank you for reading through this big "wall of text" and thanks in advance.
I'm really willing to improve my habits of keeping my musical instruments tidy and clean
#2
*bump*

(Hopefully this is not against the rules... Please let me know if it is and I apologize in advance.)
#3
Why don't you just get something that's actually made for cleaning guitars instead of those things you did get?
#4
@JackovSlayer, that's why I'm seeking advice, I'm not sure on *what* to use. Usually I don't have access to most famous brands around here, so I'll need either to import something (which will be expensive, but I'm in for it if it keeps my instrument in the best shape possible) or find the product being sold by another brand.

There's a lot of "myths" and misinformed people around here :/

So, what should I use? Lemon oil for both strings and neck?
Is it okay to start using it on my guitar even after all those synthetic oils, or is there a product I need to use first?
Last edited by Zoc at Jul 4, 2013,
#6
Quote by Zoc
@JackovSlayer, that's why I'm seeking advice, I'm not sure on *what* to use. Usually I don't have access to most famous brands around here, so I'll need either to import something (which will be expensive, but I'm in for it if it keeps my instrument in the best shape possible) or find the product being sold by another brand.

There's a lot of "myths" and misinformed people around here :/

So, what should I use? Lemon oil for both strings and neck?
Is it okay to start using it on my guitar even after all those synthetic oils, or is there a product I need to use first?


As far as I know, lemon oil is used for cleaning the fretboard. You don't have to do it often, I think that once or twice a year is enough.

I use GHS Fast Fret for strings. It oils them up and they're easier to play, you can slide across the strings a lot faster and it gives me a better feeling. It also cleans strings and fretboard. I think it's a good product and not too expensive.

Some companies like Dunlop sell guitar cleaning kits. It's a pack with everything you need, you get stuff for cleaning strings, body, neck, polishing and stuff like that, you could check those out.

Every company that makes guitar accesories has stuff for cleaning guitar. I think it's not hard to find something. If you have a music store where you live, go there and ask them what they have, they should sell these kind of products.
#7
In all honesty you don't need anything other than a dry cloth. A dry cloth will let you get and dust and fingerprints off, as well as any DNA left of the strings after playing the guitar. That's if you're someone that likes to clean your guitar after every play.

Untreated fretboards (fingerboards) like rosewood and ebony will sometimes dry up. In this case, I'd recommend linseed oil. You'd use a few dabs over the fretboard (do not cover it! 5 drops max!) and a dry, clean cloth to oil the fretboard. You'd only do this once or twice a year max depending on how dry the climate is where you live, and it'd be done when changing strings so the strings aren't in the way.

As for a proper clean of the guitar during string changes, you might want to use both a damp cloth (not wet) and a dry cloth to give a slight shine back. I've used flash wipes for cleaning TV screens on my guitars. Hasn't damaged my finishes but it might damage a nitro, I'm not sure.

All in all, there are plenty of products on the market. Do a google search of 'Planet Waves', probably the most reputable company in the world of guitar maintenance and accessories/gear etc. Head over to their website and have a look at their products. They'll probably sell something like Lemon Oil for fretboards which will replace the Linseed Oil suggestion I made. But you don't want to use real Lemon Oil, those are actually a little harmful to the wood.

Hope this long reply helps!
"Air created the greenness. And once you've got something, that leads to otherness." - Karl Pilkington.
#8
Quote by Zoc

Is it okay to start using it on my guitar even after all those synthetic oils, or is there a product I need to use first?


What's done is done - don't try to strip the old synthetic oil off, perhaps consider using a fretboard cleaner if you feel it needs it.

You sound like you care somewhat about maintenance, Dunlop make a great kit - it is a little pricey but will last for years and gives you everything you need. I personally recommend it.

http://www.jimdunlop.com/product/system-65-guitar-maintenance-kit
#9
I use the Dunlop kit too, I never bother putting oil on my strings as I try to change them every 3-4 months. I clean the fretboards every second string change(well or try too).
#10
Good points - whilst I change strings more frequently, there is such a thing as over-cleaning and over-oiling. Amount of use, storage conditions, how much you sweat and how corrosive your sweat is will dictate intervals.

Unless your fretboard looks dry I would suggest oiling every few months, and even then only a light coat. It sounds like OP is really greasing it up - it shouldn't be oily to touch.

The cleaner and wax in the kit are also great and really put a shine on the body, however the bottle of string cleaner is pretty useless - you can purchase the products separately if you are only after the fretboard gear.
Last edited by zero at Jul 7, 2013,