#1
Hi,

I'm a beginner at electric guitar and recently purchased a Epiphone Vintage G400 Worn Cherry Electric Guitar.

Been playing it for a couple of days and my fingers are killing me, and I expected as much.

Anyway, I'm having a bit of trouble pressing down the strings (particularly at the first couple of frets, e and B).

I'm not sure if this is due to the pain, lack of finger strength or because I'm playing with strings that are a too high gauge (using 10-46 I believe).

Would it be best to go down to 9-42 or stick it out with what I currently have?
#2
9-42s should be a bit easier on your fingers, yeah. though it'll still hurt a bit at the start.

the trick is doing it enough to start the callouses building up, but not so much that you actually get blisters etc. (which hurt like mad and take time to heal).
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#3
I say stick to your current string gauges, I've played on 56-13s pretty much ever since I first changed my strings :p never found a problem with blisters though.
I think generally you'll find it hurts at the start no matter what strings you use, and you just gotta sit through that period till your fingers are accustomed to it.

Tl;Dr man up, 46s are pretty light strings (to me at least) :p
#4
use whatever's most comfortable. there's no benefit to making it artificially hard on yourself, especially at the start. you want to get as good as possible as quickly as possible (aside from anything else, so you don't get demoralised and quit).

I still prefer 9s and have been playing a fair while now.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#5
I'm in camp 10-46. Though I have friends like ambler3 who play 13-56 on standard E.

As for starting advice my friend told me when I started that if I practice every day for a year I will still suck. If you take it the right way it's pretty good advice: Don't beat yourself up because you're not as good as anyone else. Sucking is completely natural and nothing to be ashamed of.

(It's a few years later and I still suck hard, but I just like playing)
#6
I started on 6's. never moved above 8's. tried 10's once, because someone told me I'd get better tone. Didn't notice a jot of difference, so went right back to my 8's.

As everyone says, keep at it, it does get better, just don't over do it. And if you think lighter strings will help, give them a whirl.
#7
^ I didn't know 6's existed.

TS, learning an instrument is teaching your body to do something it's not designed to do. Sure humans have been playing instruments for a few thousand years, but that doesn't mean we evolved into doing so. We just have the intelligence to teach ourselves to do it. The more you play, the more your body will adapt to the instrument, so keep it slow and if you feel pain you need to stop immediately and rest.
"Air created the greenness. And once you've got something, that leads to otherness." - Karl Pilkington.