#1
Hey all
I was fiddling with my guitar today and I stumbled across a chord progression that sounded familiar to my ear but I'm not sure what song it's from.

Anyways, I took a video because I want to know if my assumption that it is in the key of E maj and it's a 6, 4, 1, 5 progression, is correct...yes, no?
the only reason that I think it's E maj is because when I end it on E maj it sounds like it resolves. (to me)


The chords are: C#min, A , E, B

The last two times I played a different version of the C#min (a last second decision) but it's the same chord.

So whats the key and the progression?

here is the video...sorry for the bad sound quality (cell phone vid)

http://youtu.be/0y4B9l4r7KI
Last edited by ken styles at Jul 4, 2013,
#2
I'd say it's more C# minor. They do share the same notes after all, so it's really easy to "slip" into E major.

As for the song it might belong to, though there are a lot of songs with that progression, I'd say, from the tempo and rhythm, that it might be Fix You by Coldplay.
#4
Quote by ken styles
so in that case of C# min it's a: 1, 6, 3, 7?

Yes.
Or in Roman numerals, i - VI - III - VII
#5
Ya, I'd say it's in C# minor, but it's a good chord progression in that it can resolve on the relative major, or the tonic minor.
"Air created the greenness. And once you've got something, that leads to otherness." - Karl Pilkington.
#6
If the song/progression consists of only those chords, it's in E major.

Your ending is a full cadence on E (V to I), B major to E major. Not only is the progression not resting on C#m but if it were you would have most likely used its dominant V chord which is G# or G#7, and you don't.

HTH.
Last edited by itorres008 at Jul 8, 2013,
#7
It's somewhat ambiguous until the end when the B-E gives it a strong sense of E. That V-I removes the ambiguity that was there until then.

Up until that point, I could have heard it as B or as C#m. You either have a plagal cadence at the end of each phrase (IV-I) or an Aoelian cadence in the turnaround (bVII-i). Both are fairly common. Of course the A isn't diatonic to B major, but the bVII is pretty common. The more I listen to it, the more I hear it as in B until the end, but I think strummed in different ways I could get the C#m resolution pretty easily.
#9
Quote by itorres008
If the song/progression consists of only those chords, it's in E major.

Your ending is a full cadence on E (V to I), B major to E major. Not only is the progression not resting on C#m but if it were you would have most likely used its dominant V chord which is G# or G#7, and you don't.

HTH.

Although I don't disagree with you on the key being Emajor, I would like to point out that it isn't required that one use the dominant chord in a minor key/minor chord progression. Also, the dominant chord in the key of C#minor is G#m or G#m7. As I said though, the key is Emajor.
#10
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