#1
I find transcribing notes darn easy and fun, but im unsure how to approach power chords i know that a power chord is the Root+5th+Roote not doubled on an octave lower. But they're so many different ways to play them. Should i just memorize every power chord? or just fiddle on the guitar until i find something similar to what im looking for? I also cant tell pitches, should i learn what pitch is which by sound and then once i know work from there?
#2
A power chord is;

D ---5
A ---5
E ---3

That is, really, the only way to play a power chord, that finger positioning, unless you're droptuned.

G ---5
D ---5
A ---3
E ---3

There's also that one, which is just a powerchord with the fifth in the bass, so, I don't know what you mean by memorise every powerchord, as that's about it, all transcribing a power chord will be will be finding the pitch and transcribing it. You say you can't tell pitches, so do some online ear training regarding intervals, when transcribing, you must always start with a time signature, clef and key signature. Once the key signature is there, it's a matter of figuring out what notes and chords are being used, and that is often self explanatory, as a leading chord will either be I or vi in a lot of popular music.
#3
In my experience, like 99% of the time a power chord is played like:

-2-
-0-

or with the octave

-2-
-2-
-0-

Of course, you can move that shape to different frets too.

IMO just memorizing every variation of a power chord is pretty pointless. What you could do is learn new variations as you encounter them in different songs. Also, I find it pretty much better in every way to figure things out as deliberately as possible; you said "fiddle around" until you find something similar, but its better to just listen to what you're transcribing. Make your best guess at what the fingering is rather than go through a bunch of different things almost at random to figure it out. You probably already do that, but I feel it helpful to bring up; I think pretty much all of us start off in a sort of "random chance phase". It's because we don't start off with enough experience to be more deliberate with things like composing or transcription.

As for learning pitches, I think it comes pretty much naturally through time and experience. You seem like you know what's up, but just try and put more emphasis on paying attention to the notes you're playing and how they relate to other notes. Once you get a few riffs down really well- you might already have done this- you should be able to tune your guitar to the sound of those riffs and do it reasonably well. If you can tune your guitar by ear you know you're making progress, but developing a good ear really is more complicated than that.

Everything music is pretty much just a matter of well-focused effort.
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#4
you absolutely need to be able to recognize pitch, how are you able to play single notes by ear if you don't already have this down?

power chords are essentially just single notes with a fifth added. there's nothing to memorize. sometimes the fifth will be above, sometimes the fifth will be below. sometimes there might be added octave notes. that stuff you can just figure out by playing them to yourself on guitar and getting used to how they sound.
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Last edited by vIsIbleNoIsE at Jul 5, 2013,
#5
I always thought it was unfair that the diatone 1-5 is named a powerchord. Why couldn't all diatones be called a powerchord? Afterall a powerchord isn't a chord to begin with. It not even acknowledged in the music world.
#6
Quote by TheProtoTYPE
I always thought it was unfair that the diatone 1-5 is named a powerchord. Why couldn't all diatones be called a powerchord? Afterall a powerchord isn't a chord to begin with. It not even acknowledged in the music world.


Uhm, a powerchord actually is a chord.

D]--5--
A]--5--
E]--3--


It's just the fact that alot of people don't play powerchords although they think they are actually playing them, where in actuality they are playing perfect 5ths

A]--5--
E]--3--
baab
#8
Quote by TheProtoTYPE
I always thought it was unfair that the diatone 1-5 is named a powerchord. Why couldn't all diatones be called a powerchord? Afterall a powerchord isn't a chord to begin with. It not even acknowledged in the music world.


Because guitar. Seriously, that's it, no one knows and it doesn't really matter that much anyway. The important thing is that power chords are used so much in electric guitar that there is a term that almost any guitarist will recognise if you say it to them.

Quote by My Last Words
Uhm, a powerchord actually is a chord.

D]--5--
A]--5--
E]--3--


It's just the fact that alot of people don't play powerchords although they think they are actually playing them, where in actuality they are playing perfect 5ths

A]--5--
E]--3--


No, actually, he's right. A powerchord is technically a dyad and not a chord since it only contains two distinct notes. By the dictionary definition a chord must contain at least 3 notes, not 3 pitches. Adding the extra root on top doesn't change what it is because there's still only two different notes in it.
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