#1
I've read that it messes up the intonation, but how exactly? What sounds different? Is the 12th fret on the e string not going to be an E? I dont really understand it but i dont want to try it if it's not going to work.
Quote by yellowfrizbee
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#2
That neck is a different scale length than a strat neck. A strat neck is 25.5" scale, so you need a neck that will make the distance from the nut to the bridge 25.5".
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#3
Yes i know that they're different scale lengths. As i asked, why is that a problem. Why/how does it change the intonation? What are the effects?
Quote by yellowfrizbee
What does a girl have to do to get it in the butt thats all I ever wanted from you. Why, Ace? Why? I clean my asshole every night hoping and wishing and it never happens.
Bitches be Crazy.

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#4
Because the bridge is located in the spot that will allow there to be 25.5" between the saddles and the nut. When you throw a Jaguar neck on a strat body unless to move the bridge to be (what ever it is 24" or 22.5" I do not know) you will be out of tune no mater where/what string you play, except while the string is played open.
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
#5
I'f I were you.....
I'd go on ebay and look for conversion necks, the SQUIER JAGMASTER or SQUIER classic vibe DUO-SONIC....are both are made for a 25 1/2" strat scale but feel just like the jag(well they both have a flatter radius but that might be a good thing..e.g. less choke off on bends,)

Traded a gibson sg to my buddy for a FENDER 1990's mim Duo-Sonic reissue, the bridge to pocket has the same (25 1/2"strat) distance from bridge to neck pocket but with the conversion neck it was only 22 1/2" or 22 3/4" From nut to saddle I believe...
E.G. the jagmaster (made to make it a 24": like jag/mustang/ jag-stang, and duo-sonic.)
Frets are placed differently on conversion necks to give the correct scale,

The 12th fret should always measure half of the scale length (from inside of nut to body side edge of the Metal 12th fret for low e and g saddles to intonate correctly*

*also how you perform a rough intonation.........set the low E and G to measure the full scale (or half from 12th fret to saddle ..then you, well, that's a guide for another time haha.

conversion necks are the only thing that are gonna work for you...

Do you have a Jaguar?
why would you want to use that on a strat??? When introduced the fender Jaguar was Fender's Top model!!!!
Just needs a little TLC and tweaking / easy mods,

I still have the maple w/ maple fretboard conversion neck from the Fender Duo-Sonic that would work for you if you're interested ... trade or sell ect....
I have the JagMaster neck on it right now..... i'm a shortscale nut....(i have small hands so...)
anyways, = ) feel free to contact me whenever
Last edited by antisyst at Jul 6, 2013,
#6
People seem to have the right idea but not quite. (I have experience with this as I tend to learn the hard way) Basically you can still tune the open strings fine, however as you move up the neck the guitar will sound more and more out of tune. This is very frustrating. I really advise you not to do this as it may sound okay now but after you do it you will realise just how noticeably the guitar goes out of tune (a lot). The only way to make up for this would be to move the bridge, possibly leaving holes in your guitar or discoloured patches. This is not too hard (the bridge will probably cover the holes). But you also have to consider the massive trem route in a strat meaning that if the bridge is moved it may not fit and the trem probably won't work!
Last edited by Pafiki at Jul 9, 2013,
#7
Pafiki seems to have the right idea but not quite.
As Robb first stated, the important thing is to make the distance from the nut to the bridge correct for the scale of the neck. This is the crux of the problem.
As with any engineering problem there is more than one solution.
You can move the bridge, as Pafiki suggests or you could just get a conversion neck as antisyst suggests.
Or you can try and mess with the neck-body joint to make sure the nut-bridge distance is correct.
All these are possible solutions. The only thing wrong with Pafiki and antisyst's suggestions was that they both said theirs was the only way.
#8
Quote by von Layzonfon

antisyst's said his suggestion was the only way.

That tends to happen when you give advice in the form of a sales pitch.

Here's a rather rough explanation as to why since you also seemed interested in that. On fretless instruments such as the (classical/double) bass, viola, violin and so forth, you have to push the string to the fingerboard at a certain point to hit a certain note, That is because the length/tension of a string alter the frequency of the strings vibration when plucked. By pushing down or fretting a note, you effectively shorten the string thus causing the note to be higher. These different notes require different string lengths and tensions. Now you'll never be playing the EXACT pitch of the note, you'll always be a few cents off at least, however if you are too far off you can cause the pitch of your note to rise a few cents or in some cases a full semitone.

How does this translate to guitar? The frets are placed in positions in close approximation (however never exactly on the note,unless you have true temperment frets, To ensure a close approximation of the notes on all of the strings) to the points at which certain notes are made. However Scale length changes where these positions are on the fretboard. The reason for this is because a guitar with a longer scale will have its frets placed differently than a guitar with a shorter scale. This is due to the fact that a 24.75" scaled guitar in E standard will have lower string tension than a guitar with a 25.5" scale in E standard and as such the frets must be placed closer to the bridge on a 24.75" scaled guitar to make the string vibrate at the same frequency. The inverse applies with a 25.5" scale guitar, on a 25.5 inch scale guitar the bridge must be placed farther away to accommodate for the higher string tension.

Now between guitars of the same scale length, the neck might also be a different length depending on how many frets are on the neck, and how much space there is on the body. some guitars have 18" long necks, some have 18.5" long necks, and small deviations like this will throw off your guitars intonation fairly badly, likely beyond what bridge adjustment can fix.

While I'm at it, intonation, what is this? intonation is how "in tune" your guitar is all the way down the fretboard. The only way to have 100% perfect intonation in all places on all strings is to have true temperment frets, however you can get decently close with the frets most guitars come with. Intonation on most guitars can be adjusted down on the guitars bridge my moving the saddles (the small blocks your strings rest on at the bridge). Assuming your guitar is properly fretted, that the bridge is far away/close enough to the nut (the slotted bit at the end of the freboard farthest from the body) you should be able to intonate your guitar to a close enough level that the deviation isn't noticeable.

There is actually a decent amount to this now That I'm finished writing all that, But the reasons above are why you can't just flip whatever neck on to whatever guitar. without a little extra work unless the guitars have the same neck and scale length.

Forgive any small spelling errors or repeated things, I've been up for about 36 hours now.
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Last edited by Viban at Jul 10, 2013,
#9
Wasn't a sales pitch.. Just trying to be helpful = ) ..
and we were talking about a strat here as to "ony way..." unless he wanted to hack up the body, and I can't give that advise when the op was asking about just swapping diff. scale necks = )....

I could see how someone could read this post looking for answers on their hard tail / top loader / other geetar though....

So used to the shortscale & offset sites
Last edited by antisyst at Feb 2, 2014,