#1
(I wasn't sure where this was meant to go) but I've been watching Marty Friedmans Melodic Control on youtube as I want to expand what I know regarding soloing and not being stuck in pentatonics or diatonics boxes.

I dont really get what hes doing though, he says hes using arpeggios and following the chords with them but when I play an arpeggio it just sounds boring and shit and the same kind of sound even if I change with the chords.

Just that boring 1,3,5 sound.

Am I getting it right though that thats what an arpeggio is and those 3 notes are what you play in them?

I cant really make anything interesting out of it and dont really understand how to use or apply what hes saying.
#2
Provided you're following each chord change it can be a really effective tool. Friedman will also use 7th chords, so there's another note to play with, then add in chromatics etc.

It takes a while to get a good sound out of just using arpeggios to follow each chord, if you start by just playing it straight up and down, that's a good foundation. Once you've got that sorted there's some more stuff you can try out:

Vary the note length, use note articulations (slides, hammers, taps, bends, vibrato etc), think about where you're playing in the bar (don't always start on the first beat), vary the note order, use wider intervals, add in notes from the scale and make sure you actually like the sound of the chord progression you're playing over!

Transcribe some of the lines he does that you like, analyse them and alter them. If you google "Tuesday Wisdom: In The Style Of Marty Friedman" there's a good lesson, provided you can see how he's targeting the chord tones.
#3
You're really overthinking it.

Following the chords means LISTENING to the chords to help you choose what to play , but more importantly listen to how the notes you've chosen interact with those chords...an A played over a B major chord will sound very different to one played over an Am chord.
Actually called Mark!

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#4
Quote by steven seagull
You're really overthinking it.

Following the chords means LISTENING to the chords to help you choose what to play , but more importantly listen to how the notes you've chosen interact with those chords...an A played over a B major chord will sound very different to one played over an Am chord.


This is a wonderful thought.
#5
This is the bit Im struggling with.
Finding the way things sound and being able to make the sounds I want to hear is my main goal at the moment.

Im doing a lot of learning songs by ear and intervals too.
Im thinking of recording myself playing a few chords and playing some things over them too to see what sounds good.
#6
And thats where experimentation comes into it.

Imagine you'd never eaten bacon...nobody could truly make you understand how bacon tastes. They could describe it all they want, tell you as much as there possibly is to know about bacon and you still wouldnt really be any closer to knowing what it tasted like.
You can read or be told as much stuff as you want, but until you start hearing these things for yourself in music its not going to make complete sense. You just need to play ariund and be more active in your listening, like everything else in guitar it takes time.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


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