#1
don't know if this has been disgussed so let me know if it's already been covered.

Can someone tell me what properties a neck needs to have? putting aside tones and looks what does the wood need to be? i'm talking bolt on here but feel free to mention other types. i assume hardwood for a start but does it need to be able to keep it's shape or does a truss rod get rid of that issue? how strong does it need to be? what should a neck NOT be?
basicaly i live in the uk and it's very expensive to get the regular woods used for necks so if i know what it has to be then i can find a native wood that will do the job.
#2
Neck woods need to have a stiff, straight grain. You'll notice that there aren't a lot of types of wood used - maple, mahogany, and more rarely rosewood cover probably 95% of non-laminated necks in production guitars.

It needs to be able to keep its shape well. A truss rod offsets some of the string tension but it does so only in one direction, so the neck has to resist twisting and warping on its own.

What do you have access to? Surely you have some type of maple available.
#3
Quote by Roc8995
Neck woods need to have a stiff, straight grain. You'll notice that there aren't a lot of types of wood used - maple, mahogany, and more rarely rosewood cover probably 95% of non-laminated necks in production guitars.

It needs to be able to keep its shape well. A truss rod offsets some of the string tension but it does so only in one direction, so the neck has to resist twisting and warping on its own.

What do you have access to? Surely you have some type of maple available.

thanks for that. that probably covers my query. off the top of my head the closest to maple we have is sycamore, but straight grain stuff we have beech and birch too so i'm thinking they would be suitable for a decent neck.
#4
The other option would be to do a laminate for a neck. As far as I know you can use nearly anything for a lam because it's mostly the glue holding everything together. Certainly laminate necks tend to use some of the more exotic stuff that you don't see in regular 1 or 2 piece necks.
#6
that seems very expensive if you ask me. when you consider how much a plank of wood that's not marked for a guitar costs even when its exotic wood.
#7
Well it's a case of both being fit for purpose and market forces, isn't it? They've taken the time to select a piece that they deem suitable for use as a guitar neck and are asking a premium for that service, which "the masrket" is evidently willing to pay.

Given that a premium quality finished neck could set you back hundreds, that doesn't seem too bad a saving.

If you want dirt cheap then, as Col said, you can laminate a bunch of any old lumber (within reason).