#1
What are some good ways to train hearing these chords? As of now I just play a chord and sing the notes in it. However, this is slow. After careful analyzation of what's happening with me, I have found that the problem is I can't hear the root of the chords too well. RIght now, when I hear chords I just hear their "essence" (a major chord sounds like a major chord, regardless of the inversion). I want to be able to hear the root of the chord better, because with that Ill be able to hear all the other notes in it more easily, based off the root, which will help my hearing of all chords.
What are some excersizes or websites or w.e. that can help with hearing the roots in the chords? I use this to test my chord ear:
http://www.musictheory.net/exercises/ear-chord
#2
The way you're doing it is really the best way. You can use musictheory.net to play the chords stacked or arpeggiated, both ways are vital.

The key is to just do it, haha. Maybe, if you have a friend you jam with, have them sing the dim or augmented triads.

They key to hearing those is to know that one is a minor triad with a b5, so it kind of falls short to the ear or feels crunched together and the augmented triad is a major triad with a #5, so it kind of feels really long or overextended.

The thing that helped me is that I took an aural skills class and my teacher would sing the triads and we would have to recognize them, either just by saying them out loud or writing them out in notation.


Maybe you could clarify about what you're having trouble with recognizing the root and I could help you some more.
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#3
Quote by TDKshorty
The way you're doing it is really the best way. You can use musictheory.net to play the chords stacked or arpeggiated, both ways are vital.

The key is to just do it, haha. Maybe, if you have a friend you jam with, have them sing the dim or augmented triads.

They key to hearing those is to know that one is a minor triad with a b5, so it kind of falls short to the ear or feels crunched together and the augmented triad is a major triad with a #5, so it kind of feels really long or overextended.

The thing that helped me is that I took an aural skills class and my teacher would sing the triads and we would have to recognize them, either just by saying them out loud or writing them out in notation.


Maybe you could clarify about what you're having trouble with recognizing the root and I could help you some more.

That's how our teacher explained it to us. It's good to find a place that will play both randomly. If you really want to get on this stuff, look in to MacGamut.
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brot pls
#4
Quote by BladeSlinger
That's how our teacher explained it to us. It's good to find a place that will play both randomly. If you really want to get on this stuff, look in to MacGamut.



MacGamut is what we used in my theory class this past year, and it is great for things like dictation (though the interface is pretty crap, I think) but for just ear training like intervals, chords, etc., you're better off just using the musictheory.net. It's free, for one, and does basically the same thing as MacGamut, which costs about $40. As for recognizing the root, it comes with practice. That was a huge hurdle for many people in my class this past year. Try to single out the pitches of the chord and sing them. It helped me immensely after I learned to do that.
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#6
Quote by jazz_rock_feel
MacGamut is the biggest piece of shitbag software.

It's the only one I've used. It's used for all four Aural classes at my school. Luckily, I only needed one of those.
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Why would you spend tens of thousands of dollars to learn about a language you already speak? It was over before it even started dude

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brot pls
#7
I used it for four semesters of aural training. My ear still sucks.

That said, by the end of the third semester I totally didn't find a way to route the midi from MacGamut into a Max patch that identified what pitches were being played. That would be academically dishonest. <_<
#8
Quote by macashmack
What are some good ways to train hearing these chords? As of now I just play a chord and sing the notes in it. However, this is slow. After careful analyzation of what's happening with me, I have found that the problem is I can't hear the root of the chords too well. RIght now, when I hear chords I just hear their "essence" (a major chord sounds like a major chord, regardless of the inversion). I want to be able to hear the root of the chord better, because with that Ill be able to hear all the other notes in it more easily, based off the root, which will help my hearing of all chords.
What are some excersizes or websites or w.e. that can help with hearing the roots in the chords? I use this to test my chord ear:
http://www.musictheory.net/exercises/ear-chord

Did you ever sort out the best way to hear diminished/augmented.....
i'm trying this now.......my approach is to learn the root to fifth tone and fifth to root sounds...so for diminished ( tritones).....i'm hearing 'the simp(sons)' ascending... or preferably descending ....Blue 7 ( Sonny Rollins)......i need to lock in one of these sounds to the chord sound..
sometimes i mis-hear and think its a minor chord....( i associate minor with "greensleeves")...

how are you doing this?
#9
diminished chords have a very distinct sound.every note being a minor third apart.and as a symmetrical scale (8 tone) it has a specific purpose..as it is tought...any note can be the root (of the arpeggio-1 b3-b5-6 tones of the scale which form the chord Xdim7 on each tone)..which is true..an in depth study of how the chord is used in context of song structures will bring understanding to this very versatile chord.

the augmented chord is formed from the six tone augmented scale (also symmetrical)..tones 1-3-#5 produce another unique sound and it is used with care and caution in song structures..finding the root by ear for this chord may be a bit of a challenge..but again..hearing it in context of a song may open the understand of how this wonderful chord works.

a thorough study of both these chord types should keep one busy for quite a while as they open many harmonic and melodic roads to voice leading, harmonic devices, melodic intervals and chord substitution and re-harmonization

play well

wolf
Last edited by wolflen at Aug 12, 2013,
#10
 Well, pal, I recommend you to save your health, it is not a toy to playing, so...at first, you have to go to the doctor!  So, in case audiology expert or doctor can’t localize your problem, you should  go to neurologist or cardiology specialist. Only this way can help you to find the reason. My uncle has the same problem. I bought hearing aid for him, but I had spent a relatively long time in the good hearing aid searching. Finally I found it on artone with hope it will work for a long time. Fortunately it has been working for a while and I hard believe it will keep working constantly. I can recommend you only; go to the doctor, don't wait for a miracle, it will not disappear itselves. 
#12
macashmacktranscribing basslines will help you identify the root note. If you can already hear the essence of the chord as you say, then that's half the battle won already.
Last edited by mdc at Jul 30, 2017,
#13
Besides hearing and identifying chords on a website or app, and singing the chord.
You can try to play on a piano/guitar the chord to feel the sound.
You can sing the arpeggio or randomly

But basically, it's repetition and repetition with this kind of things. There is no magic.
#14
"Training" may be the wrong word for how you want to learn this.

Trying to identify intervals or scale degrees between the pitches is too slow and unnecessary. You want to learn to recognize chord types instantly in various musical contexts just like you recognize a familiar face whether it is close or far, front, angle or profile, lighting is bright or dark, etc. When you recognize a face, that happens before or even without you immediately recalling their name, without comparing the distances between eyes, nose, and mouth, without doing any geometric pattern analysis of their faces' parts - you recognize them instantly. That is the way you want to recognize chord types.

Most people can already do this for major and minor chord types, and it just takes a while to get the rest. Hearing chords in real music is the best way to learn because the chords are not random, they have functional meaning. You learn that when you hear a certain sequence of chords there are various possible "paths" the music can take, including the use of certain chord types that you can anticipate. Confirmation of an anticipated possible chord is similar to instant recognition, really about the same thing because both use the same underlying process - functional hearing of the music.
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#15
I recommend looking at thread age before responding to a thread that's been bumped by a bot.