#1
I have this problem of starting to learn a song and then after 5 minutes get bored so i try another song and and another and so on.
Does anyone else do this? and if you used to how did you overcome it?
I've probably started over 100 songs and finished about 5
#2
Well in my early days of guitar, I could play at least 30 to 40 riffs, but only knew about 3 whole songs (Paranoid, Sunshine of Your Love, and Smells Like Teen Spirit), but that was mostly because I couldn't play the other songs completely cause I wasn't good enough. Now, when I want to learn a song, I won't even try to start learning if I know I won't want to finish. For example, I don't feel like learning War Pigs by Black Sabbath because I just couldn't be bothered to want to learn more than the solo, so why pull up the 4 page tab if I don't want to learn the song. But I wanted to learn Floods by Pantera, so I sat down and learned it.
#3
You are certainly not alone in this. I even just posted a thread that has hints of what you're asking. I'm seldom bothered to learn entire songs just because I'm lazy like that. I just learn cool riffs and so on. Though I believe if you want to get into songwriting or advanced soloing you will have to learn/study full songs so you can get the gist of what's going on in the entire song rather than just that one cool riff. I came to the realization that, when writing songs, not all riffs and parts need to be the next iconic thing. So I guess learning riffs is more of a fun/ear catching thing as opposed to full songs where it's more performance/songwriting oriented.
#4
stop using tabs
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#6
I do the same i usually learn most parts of a song then skip on the solo as usually its beyond my ability and i cant play it.Solos have always intimidated me but i dont play that often and ive never been intrested in playing in a band or anything.
#7
Quote by Hail
stop using tabs

What would that do to help? I tend to have the same problem so I'm curious.
Quote by Fat Lard
Why would you spend tens of thousands of dollars to learn about a language you already speak? It was over before it even started dude

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brot pls
#8
Stopping using tabs won't help, it makes songs easier to learn. The main thing is motivation, what's your reason for learning these songs? If you aren't going to perform them, it can be hard to learn the whole thing, in fact, I mainly learn the solos to songs, as I know I'm unlikely to ever be in a Finnish Power Metal cover band! My repertoire is now mainly classical pieces arranged for Electric Guitar, as that's what I perform and record, so I'd say to solve this problem, you need to know why you want to play them. Even though the forum does badmouth guitarists who just know the famous riffs, if that's what you want to learn, why not? As long as you aren't skipping things that are too hard (I actually skip things that aren't too hard, so I'm forced to spend hours slowing down passages of Symphony X songs, etc) then it's fine. You should probably get some repertoire, but make sure they're interesting songs, the issue with the songs with famous riffs is that generally, your audience will get bored, as the riffs are often the best, or, only good part of the song, so seek out more interesting pieces of music that really excite you.
#9
What you could do is set a timetable for each day. For instance, say you want to learn the entire song "NIB" by Black Sabbath (fairly simple song in my estimation). Spend 10 minutes working on the guitar part with a metronome. Keep doing that every day until you learn the whole song. If it's a song you really enjoy working on, then possibly increase your practice time; but don't spend too long on any one song each day.
Last edited by crazysam23_Atax at Jul 9, 2013,
#10
Quote by CelestialGuitar
Stopping using tabs won't help, it makes songs easier to learn.


using tabs to learn music is like doing half-push-ups. it spoils people and progress is hindered or halted because it turns the process of replicating music into numbers and input-output

I guarantee TS looks up tabs and never listens to the song while they play through the tab until they get bored, forget the riffs, and clicks the next one. i did the same thing until i realized all i was doing was wasting time and building my ego into thinking i was hot shit between bedroom shredding and learning slayer riffs i could only play out of time and sloppy
Quote by Kevätuhri
Hail isn't too edgy for posts, posts are not edgy enough for Hail.


Quote by UseYourThumb
You win. I'm done here.
Last edited by Hail at Jul 10, 2013,
#12
I definitely have the same problem. Especially if the other parts of the song are easy like power chords or too difficult/fast for me at the time. I don't think it's all bad though, because at least you learned some new guitar licks in the process. Now if I was performing the song live in a few weeks, I would approach it much differently.
#13
I agree with the "stop using tabs" comment.

It also means doing some dedicated ear work.

The idea is to connect what you're doing with your hands to what you love about music. You just relate to music different with your ears than with your fingers.
#14
Quote by Hail
using tabs to learn music is like doing half-push-ups. it spoils people and progress is hindered or halted because it turns the process of replicating music into numbers and input-output

I guarantee TS looks up tabs and never listens to the song while they play through the tab until they get bored, forget the riffs, and clicks the next one. i did the same thing until i realized all i was doing was wasting time and building my ego into thinking i was hot shit between bedroom shredding and learning slayer riffs i could only play out of time and sloppy

How can you even use tabs without listening to the song? I use tabs to memorize songs.


And to people who advise learning by ear, what do you think of sheet music? Tabs are just a different form of notation. I use tabs but I also read sheet music fluently, just not very well with guitar. Sheet music is the exact same concept as tabs.
Quote by Fat Lard
Why would you spend tens of thousands of dollars to learn about a language you already speak? It was over before it even started dude

Quote by captainsnazz
brot pls
#15
Quote by BladeSlinger
And to people who advise learning by ear, what do you think of sheet music? Tabs are just a different form of notation. I use tabs but I also read sheet music fluently, just not very well with guitar. Sheet music is the exact same concept as tabs.


They aren't the same thing though. Sheet music shows rhythmic values, and in tonal music the function of the notes being played, tablature only shows you where to put your fingers. One system is universal which works across every instrument whereas the other only works for the specific instrument you write it for.

I don't think it's necessary to learn by ear in order to be good at your instrument though. It's certainly possible and not too difficult a task if you listen to music without too many lines going on at once. But the threadstarter's problems are probably more to do with a short attention span than not having a very good ear.
.
Last edited by Nietsche at Jul 11, 2013,
#16
^ +1 to first paragraph. i can read a score and tell you, to a reasonable extent, what a piece will sound like prior to hearing it.

a strong ear isn't integral to playing your instrument by yourself (unless you're playing any instrument that isn't fretted or a piano...which is most of them) but it is important when it comes to playing in tandem with others and will supplement your timing and general ability to perform and pick up on music quite a bit

also, if you're not good at reading sheet music for guitar, you're not fluent lol
Quote by Kevätuhri
Hail isn't too edgy for posts, posts are not edgy enough for Hail.


Quote by UseYourThumb
You win. I'm done here.
#17
Quote by Hail
^ +1 to first paragraph. i can read a score and tell you, to a reasonable extent, what a piece will sound like prior to hearing it.

a strong ear isn't integral to playing your instrument by yourself (unless you're playing any instrument that isn't fretted or a piano...which is most of them) but it is important when it comes to playing in tandem with others and will supplement your timing and general ability to perform and pick up on music quite a bit

also, if you're not good at reading sheet music for guitar, you're not fluent lol

I play more than one instrument and have had a small amount of formal education in music. I read both clefs fluently, and can read choir music alright with time.

I can read music perfectly well, I just don't know the notes on guitar very well. If you give me an alto saxophone I'll be right at home. I can read music better on piano than guitar I think and I've barely learned anything on piano.

I guess I have the same problem as TS but in different ways. My ear isn't terrible but it's not the best either. I struggled in my aural theory class because my ear isn't up to par with a lot of other musicians. I might try doing some songs by ear. I definitely have a short attention span at times.
Quote by Fat Lard
Why would you spend tens of thousands of dollars to learn about a language you already speak? It was over before it even started dude

Quote by captainsnazz
brot pls
Last edited by BladeSlinger at Jul 11, 2013,
#18
Quote by Nietsche
They aren't the same thing though. Sheet music shows rhythmic values, and in tonal music the function of the notes being played, tablature only shows you where to put your fingers. One system is universal which works across every instrument whereas the other only works for the specific instrument you write it for.

This is why you should use GuitarPro Tabs or Power Tabs, which have the sheet music and the tabs (and also tend to show more than one instrument). The great part is that, because you have the sheet music, you can ignore the tab fingerings and come up with your own fingerings, which I do for some songs.


I refuse to use any standard tabs that don't also (at the minimum) include rhythmic values.
Last edited by crazysam23_Atax at Jul 11, 2013,