#1
I want to understand what "technique" is going on in this repeating triplets phrase (4x) at 5:22 to 5:34.
The video is here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=90KBh0gCccw&t=5m20s

Is he is doing something like "playing over changes"?
He is playing 4 distinct triplets phrases that sounds related
(like just shifting down a fret)
The backing chords are: F# ...A ...B ...(D->E->D)

Here is the tab:
http://www.guitaretab.com/m/metallica/11871.html

1978 Les Paul Custom Sunburst
2001 USA Strat (Hot & Cool Rails)
Effects: Boss GT-6 with Tech-21 Power Amp
#2
Yes. He's following the chords in the background.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#3
I figured out the tab is wrong.
I think he's doing Eddie Van Halen style fingertapping, this is why it's so "out of this world".

E|--19p14p12----------17p14p10----------17p12p10--
B|------------------------------------------------
G|------------------------------------------------
D|------------------------------------------------
A|------------------------------------------------
E|------------------------------------------------
1978 Les Paul Custom Sunburst
2001 USA Strat (Hot & Cool Rails)
Effects: Boss GT-6 with Tech-21 Power Amp
#4
Quote by MissingSomethin
I figured out the tab is wrong.
I think he's doing Eddie Van Halen style fingertapping, this is why it's so "out of this world".

E|--19p14p12----------17p14p10----------17p12p10--
B|------------------------------------------------
G|------------------------------------------------
D|------------------------------------------------
A|------------------------------------------------
E|------------------------------------------------

No, it's not wrong. And you actually tabbed the same notes. But he's not using tapping, he's picking the notes on the B string and using pull-offs on the E string. Really common technique and Kirk Hammett uses it really often.

17th fret of B string = 12th fret of E string.

It may be a bit easier to play with tapping but that's not how Kirk plays it.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#5
Quote by MissingSomethin
I figured out the tab is wrong.
I think he's doing Eddie Van Halen style fingertapping, this is why it's so "out of this world".

E|--19p14p12----------17p14p10----------17p12p10--
B|------------------------------------------------
G|------------------------------------------------
D|------------------------------------------------
A|------------------------------------------------
E|------------------------------------------------

Ermmm...no, that's not really in Hammet's style.
#6
Those aren't triplets, those are sixteenth notes. They've been grouped into a recurring pattern of two groups of three plus one group of two. Also, although the notes of the pattern shift with every chord change, he isn't playing chord tone lines so this doesn't follow the changes in the usual sense. In terms of note choice all the notes in the lick and the chords underneath are diatonic to the key of B minor. There's nothing really special about this passage to be honest, it's a standard Hammet cliché.

If you want a player in a similar style with a much better grasp of playing changes you should listen to Marty Friedman.
.
Last edited by Nietsche at Jul 10, 2013,