#1
So I recently slapped on D'addario Chromes on my Dean Evo. I love the feel and the warmth of them, but when I push my OD pedals (A proco Rat through a Silver Kiss MKII into a Fender Twin), it sounds a little muddy. I also have a pretty big pedalboard, and they seem to be effected by the sound degradation more so than roundwound. Thoughts?

Anyone out there who play flatwound, aside from the jazz guys? (no offense, but they seem to be kind of standard with them)
#2
Strictly jazz strings IMO, maybe if you were a really zealous early country music player you might use them too.

They're hard to grip, they've got no treble, they don't bend well and they are expensive. That's fine for jazz where you want to be smooth and mellow, but for everything else they sound dull and feel slippery - and not usually in a good way, and for picking as well as fingering.

"Muddy" is how everyone describes them after I try to tell them not to use them and they get all set up for 12s and do it anyway
For some reason people seem to really insist on trying out these strings even though they're basically the opposite of every string advancement that's been made in the last 60 years, and every popular string type. Not that I'm against experimentation, but it's funny how these strings draw people in despite being totally wrong for 99% of players.
#3
You get far less overtones with flatwound strings. Less harmonic content. Hence, a bassier tone. You'll either have to tweak your settings to compensate for the loss of high end and increase in low end, or go back to roundwound.
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#4
You can also play smooth with regular strings for jazz anyway. I mean Miles Davis trumpet is the most shrillest sound in jazz.

So are Saxophones, and you hear breaths and stuff.

WEll for chords I do prefer flatwound, they make the individual notes in the chords sound more even, something you can't really control.

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Jul 10, 2013,
#5
Thomastik-Infeld have this acoustic guitar set which is G,D,A flatwound and the low E is roundwound. They're the only things i put on my acoustic guitars now.

But for electrics? Nah, they're no good.

Has anyone tried groundwounds, while we're on the topic?
#6
Seems to be a lot of negativity towards the flat-wounds. Flat-wounds are a different type of string developed and designed for a specific tone; not just an alternative for anyone to try out like switching from Ernie Ball to D'addario.

Flat-wound strings are mostly used by jazz players and are meant to give a very clean almost 'blunt' kind of sound. Strings meant for jazz are very thick and usually not meant for bending (electric 0.11s are labeled 'jazz light') but offer more smoothness and less noise when moving one's fingers across the fretboard.

Compared to roundwounds (the strings most guitarists use), they have less brightness, a longer lifespan, do less harm to frets and fretboards, but are generally more expensive.
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#7
I tried flats just to experiment, but I play rock and metal so that didn't sound too good.
#8
Quote by xxdarrenxx
WEll for chords I do prefer flatwound, they make the individual notes in the chords sound more even, something you can't really control.

i use flatwounds on a couple of my guitars for this very reason - fewer harmonic overtones seems to make it easier to hear each note within the chord more clearly, as if each note is much more separate.

so i like them for very, very clean chords and for doubling up basslines... that's about it. for the most part, i stick with roundwounds.

I use flatwounds on bass all the time though, because i find it easier to mix a bassline that's recorded with flatwounds than roundwounds
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#9
Quote by ruletheneck
Has anyone tried groundwounds, while we're on the topic?

Yeah, I like them! They feel cool but they're still rough enough to grip properly. They don't sound nearly as muffled as flats either so they'll work for more styles. Worth a shot if you want a smoother string but flats are too much of a change.

Quote by Shornifier
Seems to be a lot of negativity towards the flat-wounds. Flat-wounds are a different type of string developed and designed for a specific tone; not just an alternative for anyone to try out like switching from Ernie Ball to D'addario.

I haven't seen any negativity in this thread at all, or anywhere else that I can recall. I see a lot of people who have tried them and didn't end up liking them for their styles, but nobody's said they were bad. You're saying the exact same thing everyone else has said, which is that they're jazz strings and don't generally agree with most other players. Nothing negative about any of those statements.
#10
I put flatwounds on my tele for some clean solos on my band's new EP. It sounded great for some reverb-laden surf vibe leads (no surf-style tremolo, more legato playing). Took 'em off recently because I couldn't chord worth a damn on them.
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#11
On the topic of flatwounds, would they help with smoothing out my slide-playing?

My slide-playing is absolutely terrible, with lots of scratching-noises when I move it around the fretboard. It doesn't sound all-that-pleasant.

I usually use roundwound D'Addario .11's, but I have '09s on right now. If it affects an answer, I tune a half-step down.
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#12
Quote by sideslick
On the topic of flatwounds, would they help with smoothing out my slide-playing?

My slide-playing is absolutely terrible, with lots of scratching-noises when I move it around the fretboard. It doesn't sound all-that-pleasant.

I usually use roundwound D'Addario .11's, but I have '09s on right now. If it affects an answer, I tune a half-step down.

Nope, you should just keep practicing until your slide technique gets better. Flatwounds sound very strange with a slide, in my experience. They sure didn't mask my crappy technique, I can tell you that!
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#14
I used to put a very expensive set of flatwounds on a Music Man with 3 single-coils. It sounded beautifully. The strings added nice mellow-ness to the bright nature of the guitar. And they were really comfortable to play.
#15
Quote by terribleguitar
I used to put a very expensive set of flatwounds on a Music Man with 3 single-coils. It sounded beautifully. The strings added nice mellow-ness to the bright nature of the guitar. And they were really comfortable to play.


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#16
Sorry for my lack of knowledge here, but are groundwounds just roundwonds, grinded/grpund or smoothed out so they're "flat"? But you can still see the individual winds? Or is that a flatwound, what I'm describing.
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#17
Flats are wound with a totally flat ribbon, so they're quite smooth. Groundwounds are wound with the regular round wire and then ground down, so they're in between a flat and a regular string. I'd say the feel is closer towards the roundwound end of things.