#1
Hey Guys I had a thread about recording before, however that was very general. Now I know I want to buy: an interface with a mic. I want to use this to record my guitar through my Peavey Vypyr Tube 120W and maybe a little acoustic guitar (not my focus, just decent) and very maybe vocals (also not my focus).

So what I need:
-Mic
-Mic stand
-Mic cable
-Interface

With a budget of around 200-250, I already have studio headphones which I will use to monitor recordings.
That was straigh to the point, but I also have some questions the sticky coudn't answer me:

1) How does it work with monitoring? For example I have a song that I want to cover in my DAW and I want to listen to it on my headphones, along with my guitar. Is it then possible to pan those 2 different signals?

2) The FOCUSRITE SCARLETT 2i2 has direct monitoring, but will I still be able to hear the mix in my DAW? If so, when would you not use this function? Second it only has mono headphones out?

3) What do I need? 2i2 or 2i4? The sticky suggested FOCUSRITE SCARLETT 2i4, but why not the 2i2?

What would you guys recommend I should buy for my purposes?
Last edited by Psy8cho at Jul 11, 2013,
#2
Because the 2i2 has no pad, making it difficult to di certain things.
All I want is for everyone to go to hell...
...It's the last place I was seen before I lost myself



Quote by DisarmGoliath
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#4
DI-ing is when you plug instruments directly into the interface. Now you won't be doing that with your guitar obviously, but things like Bass guitars are nearly always DI'd. A pad is something that allows louder things to be recorded through the interface, it lowers the input volume in a certain way allowing hot signals to remain hot, but not clip (distort) the interface's input pre-amps.

As for a mic, classically a Shure SM57 is chosen. But you could go for something cheaper that's modeled on that mic if you can't fit that into your budget, like the audix i5.
All I want is for everyone to go to hell...
...It's the last place I was seen before I lost myself



Quote by DisarmGoliath
You can be the deputy llamma of the recordings forum!
Last edited by ChemicalFire at Jul 11, 2013,
#5
Do yourself a favor, don't waste time micing the Vypyr. Just invest in a solid interface like the 2i4 and use amp sims. Low end amps usually sound terrible and the Vypyrs are no exception. You'll benefit from learning how to mix an amp sim (which sound better automatically) & get that sounding good than spending a good chunk of money on a Mic + Interface and trying to mix something thats going to sound bad from the source.
Derpy Derp Derp Herp Derp
#6
Quote by lockwolf
Do yourself a favor, don't waste time micing the Vypyr. Just invest in a solid interface like the 2i4 and use amp sims. Low end amps usually sound terrible and the Vypyrs are no exception. You'll benefit from learning how to mix an amp sim (which sound better automatically) & get that sounding good than spending a good chunk of money on a Mic + Interface and trying to mix something thats going to sound bad from the source.


You are aware of the fact that I am using the Tube version right? I haven't played the Vyper SS so i don't know if it's better, but many people do say so. I also find that it sounds pretty good. But then again I have never played a real Tube either.

And ChemicalFire thnx for the explanation
#7
Quote by lockwolf
Do yourself a favor, don't waste time micing the Vypyr. Just invest in a solid interface like the 2i4 and use amp sims. Low end amps usually sound terrible and the Vypyrs are no exception. You'll benefit from learning how to mix an amp sim (which sound better automatically) & get that sounding good than spending a good chunk of money on a Mic + Interface and trying to mix something thats going to sound bad from the source.

Meh, I very much disagree with this statement.

I've owned $4600 Diezels, and the Vypyr Tube is a fine sounding amp. While I'd agree with this assessment on the solid state versions, the tube ones can actually sound really great, and are definitely not what I'd consider a low end amp. In fact, even though it sounds nothing like the amp it's modeling, the Mesa Recto model on those amps gave me some of the clearest high gain tones I've ever heard.
Quote by Dave_Mc
I've had tube amps for a while now, but never actually had any go down on me
Quote by jj1565
maybe you're not saying the right things? an amp likes to know you care.





www.SanctityStudios.com
#8
Seems like not everybody agrees, but lockwolf see it as an investment. I am probably going to buy a new amp anyway somewhere in the future. And with an interface and mic I can do both right? Also with a mic I could record things like an acoustic guitar, it's just more flexible.

Another question to ChemicalFire:
2i2 vs 2i4, so it has nothing to do with the 2 extra outputs on the 2i4 it just has more functionalities which I need right?

Anymore suggestions for mic + interface within the budget? (though it seems like I might need to stretch it?)
So far I have only seem focusrite, what else is out there and similar?
And maybe someone can answer questions 1 and 2?
#9
Quote by MatrixClaw
Meh, I very much disagree with this statement.

I've owned $4600 Diezels, and the Vypyr Tube is a fine sounding amp. While I'd agree with this assessment on the solid state versions, the tube ones can actually sound really great, and are definitely not what I'd consider a low end amp. In fact, even though it sounds nothing like the amp it's modeling, the Mesa Recto model on those amps gave me some of the clearest high gain tones I've ever heard.


I'll take your word for it. I'm always very leery of cheap tube amps as there is usually a noticeable quality difference between a nice tube amp and a cheap one. Plus, like I said, a lot of the tone is going to come in the mixing which going the amp sim route would help with.

The 2i4 is just an all around better unit than the 2i2. If money is an issue, look for a used Saffire 6 on eBay. Its the same unit, just a little older. They run anywhere from $80-$120 used. Honestly, Focusrite makes the best gear until you get into the $500+ range

If you plan on doing vocals & acoustic, I'd invest in a condenser mic like an Audio Technica AT2035. Typically, they sound better on Vox & Acoustic than a dynamic like a SM57.

You could pan your guitar left and the backing track right (or whatever) in your DAW in order to monitor.
Derpy Derp Derp Herp Derp
#10
Just to put it out there, there are more interfaces out there than just Focusrite. Not saying you shouldn't buy it, but always explore other options.

Personally I think the EIE Pro is a really strong contender...you get an extra two inputs and a whole load of extra features (VU meters, inserts, USB hub, MIDI interface etc). However, the drivers have been problematic.

As for the amp, Audix i5 would be perfect.
#11
Quote by lockwolf
If you plan on doing vocals & acoustic, I'd invest in a condenser mic like an Audio Technica AT2035. Typically, they sound better on Vox & Acoustic than a dynamic like a SM57.


Well vocals and acoustic is not really my focus, but lets just say I might record them. It's just as I said in the OP it is not my focus. If my focus is electric guitar, would you suggest the SM57?

Quote by lockwolf
You could pan your guitar left and the backing track right (or whatever) in your DAW in order to monitor.


Yes I know this much, it's just that my question originated from the mono output on the 2i2 which means I would not be able to pan them right? And maybe you didn't understand my question, I meant during my playing so:
left would be me playing live while recording and right would be the backing track, is that possible on the 2i4 or even on the 2i2?

kyle62, thnx for more options I will look into them!
#12
Quote by Psy8cho
Yes I know this much, it's just that my question originated from the mono output on the 2i2 which means I would not be able to pan them right?


Short answer, no. Each output is one channel of audio (Left or right) so you'd need to use both outputs to get the traditional Left & Right stereo sound. If you're using the Headphone output, its in Stereo so you'd be fine there.

For guitar amps, the SM57 is fine. Its pretty much what every studio throws on a guitar cab
Derpy Derp Derp Herp Derp
#13
Ok so optimal would be a focusrite scarlett 2i4 + SM57 right? Though a bit out of my price range I will consider it.
I have also been looking for cheaper ones and I found the M-Audio M Track for 100 euros and the M-Audio M Track Plus goes for 145 euros, but I don't think I need the plus version right? Also I coudn't find that pad thing on this one, but it's quite a difference in price.
What do you guys think?
#14
Not a fan of the M-Audio stuff myself. The pres are a bit naff.
All I want is for everyone to go to hell...
...It's the last place I was seen before I lost myself



Quote by DisarmGoliath
You can be the deputy llamma of the recordings forum!
#15
Quote by Psy8cho
Ok so optimal would be a focusrite scarlett 2i4 + SM57 right? Though a bit out of my price range I will consider it.
I have also been looking for cheaper ones and I found the M-Audio M Track for 100 euros and the M-Audio M Track Plus goes for 145 euros, but I don't think I need the plus version right? Also I coudn't find that pad thing on this one, but it's quite a difference in price.
What do you guys think?

Instead of the SM57 get a Blue Encore 100i (€77), and BAM! you've saved 30 euros straight away. The Prodipe TT1 (€39) is even cheaper and equally awesome.

The M-Track looks fine to me. Nothing special but to be honest, any interface with two mic inputs and phantom power will do a perfectly good job, you'd need very good ears (and gear) to hear much of a difference in quality.

The Tascam US-122 is only €90 but I like it better than the M Track, personally.
Last edited by kyle62 at Jul 13, 2013,
#16
Considering that I've done quite a few recording sessions with budget amps I disagree with the fact that a cheap amp necessarily sounds bad. I think that any amp can benefit from moving air in a room when being recorded, so I'd say get the mic setup regardless of the fact that some forum members are pushing you towards modeling. The physics of moving an amp in a room are better than the signal never seeing a real existing acoustic space. My 2c.

On the mic selection - any dynamic mic will do. Some of the ones that I like are the Senn e835, AKG 880, Senn e609, Shure SM57. Lots of other options as well, for example I recently used a ND767 on one amp and it sounded great.
#17
If you need to save cash - You can pickup a GLS ES-57 on Amazon fo $30 and it sounds surprisingly close to the Shure SM57... and IMO it feels even sturdier in your hand. INSANE value if you're looking to do some drum recording on the cheap, too!
Quote by Dave_Mc
I've had tube amps for a while now, but never actually had any go down on me
Quote by jj1565
maybe you're not saying the right things? an amp likes to know you care.





www.SanctityStudios.com
#18
hum.. I just had a crazy idea and I would like you guys to advise me on this one.
(It could be that this question does not belong in this section of the forum, so I could also make a new thread in the right section.)

What if I sold my amp + sanperra II pedal and save the money for this mic + interface which could go up to €300 and buy something like the Eleven Rack(€855)? It would be an interface as well as an upgrade and since I mainly play at home and am maybe moving into an appartment sometime soon this would also be a solution to that. On top of that I get pro tools, which I could keep or even sell?

It seems like there are two paths a guitarist can go these days, HD modeling or the tube amp way. I feel like I am on that crossroad right now.

what do you think?

edit:
I could ofc also just buy the eleven rack from someone who just bought it in order to get pro tools cheap. What price would be reasonable then? the elevenrack costs 855 in my country and pro tools 11 costs 650 as well.
Last edited by Psy8cho at Jul 17, 2013,
#19
You have to look up the version of PT that 11 Rack comes with as there are several flavors, and if the licenses are transferable. Knowing Pro Tools they probably aren't and might even be locked in with the Eleven Rack, i.e. if you boot in without it software fails.

Having worked with PT a few years back when I was a full time recording engineer, I'd have to say that it is unlikely that it is such a good deal, they usually fork out some kind of protection scheme to prevent you from doing just that...then again, not 100% sure.

I don't like the Eleven Rack as a modeler, can't say I've heard anything good from the tones on the demo of from other people that makes me want to get it.

I think that you can achieve pretty much the same results with Reaper ($50) and a vst amp modeler like Amplitube and/or one of the others for less. If you get something like Studio 1 from PreSonus, which comes standard on some of their interfaces it comes with built in modeler, so do a lot of the other DAWs.

Quite a few of the processors also come with USB interfaces that might take care of you needs. My now ageing Boss GT-10 has USB interface, the GT-100 has one too, I know most of Zoom's fx modelers have them as well, so you can go that route as well. Still, nothing better than recording a cab moving real space
Last edited by diabolical at Jul 17, 2013,
#20
The eleven rack does have something I believe the vst pluggins don't for example the use this true impedance feature which somehow makes you feel like you are playing through a real tube amp.

And yes they did something like that, there is this edit tool which you can only use when you have pro tools. So you would also not be able to install presets from sites, because it uses PT for the editing tool.
#22
I wouldn't sell the amp tbh... no matter how good an emulation is, the real thing is always better.
All I want is for everyone to go to hell...
...It's the last place I was seen before I lost myself



Quote by DisarmGoliath
You can be the deputy llamma of the recordings forum!
#23
Quote by diabolical
You have to look up the version of PT that 11 Rack comes with as there are several flavors, and if the licenses are transferable. Knowing Pro Tools they probably aren't and might even be locked in with the Eleven Rack, i.e. if you boot in without it software fails.

Avid no longer requires you to use their hardware as a dongle. You authenticate through an iLok. 11R comes with a full version of Pro Tools 10, which comes with a free upgrade to Pro Tools 11. No catch - People are just stupid if they're paying full price for the software and don't get the 11R with it.

Quote by ChemicalFire
I wouldn't sell the amp tbh... no matter how good an emulation is, the real thing is always better.

The amp he has is an emulator, though
Quote by Dave_Mc
I've had tube amps for a while now, but never actually had any go down on me
Quote by jj1565
maybe you're not saying the right things? an amp likes to know you care.





www.SanctityStudios.com
#24
It's at least tube driven... though that could mean it just has one valve in to act as a light...

If you were going to sell I'd get a new amp personally...
All I want is for everyone to go to hell...
...It's the last place I was seen before I lost myself



Quote by DisarmGoliath
You can be the deputy llamma of the recordings forum!
#25
Quote by ChemicalFire
It's at least tube driven... though that could mean it just has one valve in to act as a light...

If you were going to sell I'd get a new amp personally...

Vypyr Tubes have a tube power section
Quote by Dave_Mc
I've had tube amps for a while now, but never actually had any go down on me
Quote by jj1565
maybe you're not saying the right things? an amp likes to know you care.





www.SanctityStudios.com
#26
Quote by MatrixClaw
Vypyr Tubes have a tube power section


They also have a pre-amp tube used by the transtube-technology or something.

And thnx for the comments I will consider it all.