#1
this is a question ive been pondering for a while. i have a Marshall haze40, i dont like the od channel at all or any of the onboard effects, i only bought it cuz it was a good price (floor model from local music shop) so i use pedals for all my tone, and the amp is on the clean channel, but w/o an attenuator im only able to turn to 2-3 volume without hurting my ears. Im running a carl martin plexitone with the crunch always on at about 9 o clock for my marshall tone. this all said if the amps clean, isnt it just a glorified pa, would a solid state do the job too? i ask because im looking at the marshall mg100 half stack in white, i just like the look of it. i know pedals react differently with different amps.. any suggestions?
#2
I didn't read your entire post, but I'll say this:

You aren't using your pedals for "all tone". You're using them to alter your base tone. If you use your amp clean, that is a "tone" and your pedals are working from there. If your amp sounds like crap, you can't just make it sound better with pedals.
Originally posted by primusfan
When you crank up the gain to 10 and switch to the lead channel, it actually sounds like you are unjustifiably bombing an innocent foreign land.


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#3
well see my question really came up because at an open mic i used a tiny fender practice amp and managed to get the same tone as i do through the marshall, and just miked it... which made me wonder... guess the only way to truely find out would be to play through the solid state and see
#4
Quote by ibanezguitars44
I didn't read your entire post, but I'll say this:

You aren't using your pedals for "all tone". You're using them to alter your base tone. If you use your amp clean, that is a "tone" and your pedals are working from there. If your amp sounds like crap, you can't just make it sound better with pedals.

/thread
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#5
You can use pedals with a solid state amp sure. Will it sound better than a tube amp? That is subjective. Do what you think sounds good and don't let anyone tell you otherwise.


That's my PC answer.


Now. For the love god please do not get a Marshall MG to replace your Marshall Haze. You are wasting money at this stage in your career. That's my opinion. Don't run a C.Martin Plexitone through those crappy Marshall practice amps. If you want Marshall tone you can find it in a lot of different amps. I prefer tube amps due to the way they treat harmonics and the warmth and 'round' tone they produce.

Please tell us what all pedals you use regularly and what kind of music you play.

Then follow this:

https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showpost.php?p=31052894&postcount=2


PS: there are really nice solid state amps out there that are great with pedals.
#6
Quote by fly4acracka
well see my question really came up because at an open mic i used a tiny fender practice amp and managed to get the same tone as i do through the marshall, and just miked it... which made me wonder... guess the only way to truely find out would be to play through the solid state and see


Well maybe you just don't like the haze? It happens. Not every tube amp sounds awesome, just like not every solid state amp sounds bad.

I use an ampeg reverberocket and use pedals for overdrive and whatnot. I love how it sounds. But it sounds way better through the ampeg than my tiny practice amp. It also sounds better than when I was using a fender hot rod. You just have to find an amp you like.
Originally posted by primusfan
When you crank up the gain to 10 and switch to the lead channel, it actually sounds like you are unjustifiably bombing an innocent foreign land.


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τλε τρπ βπστλεπλσσδ
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#7
If one of those pedals is overdrive then yes. Pushing the front end of a SS amp hard rarely results in a pleasant experience.
And it depends on the amp. IMO a Fender Twin will kick a JC120's arse every time but a JC120 will beat a few tube amps out there. Again, unless you are overdriving the front end of the amp with an overdrive/boost pedal. In that case pretty much every tube amp will come out on top apart from something truly shitty.
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#8
As usual, this isn't a tube vs solid state question but a 'good amp vs bad amp' question in disguise.

A Haze is a decent amp. An MG100 is a shitty amp. Clean or dirty, MG still sucks and it's going to sound worse than the Haze in most situations. The fact that one's tube and one's SS has little to do with it.
#9
I have Marshall Haze 15 amp. I also have my old MG15CDR and my brother has MG30DFX. When I use those amps with the same pedals, the sound is very different. Haze gives me a lot better sound. MG gives me shit. Don't buy MG.
#10
It's all in your ears. Some folks say that tubes are the cat's meow while others like myself, prefer solid state . IMO, solid state amps don't require the maintenance that tubes do and they're longer lasting as well .
#11
Quote by 311ZOSOVHJH
Now. For the love god please do not get a Marshall MG to replace your Marshall Haze. You are wasting money at this stage in your career. That's my opinion. Don't run a C.Martin Plexitone through those crappy Marshall practice amps. If you want Marshall tone you can find it in a lot of different amps. I prefer tube amps due to the way they treat harmonics and the warmth and 'round' tone they produce.

Please tell us what all pedals you use regularly and what kind of music you play.

Then follow this:

https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showpost.php?p=31052894&postcount=2


PS: there are really nice solid state amps out there that are great with pedals.

+311
#12
Quote by cdr_salamander
+311


+ 1000!

I'm a tube amp kind of guy myself - love the warmth coming off them compared to a solid state. However solid state has it's advantages - It's easier to lug around, easier to maintain and most solid states have a real "clean" clean that might act as a good fx basis if that's your cup of tea. Some (most) people say it's sterile, some can hardly hear the difference in a mix.

But having owned (and still own) a Marshall MG30 I can say it's the biggest piece of junk I ever bought. It cuts out frequently, the speaker's sh*t (I don't know what's in an MG100), it has no sense of character whatsoever. Just really harsh sounding and unreliable overall.

However, if you have to chance to try out a Roland JC120 Jazz-Chorus for example, you might like it.

Cheers!
#13
tube amps require maintenace moreso the ss.

However when ur ss amp is broken it's usually not fixable by hand, where a tube amp by design is pretty much always fixable.

So if anything an SS amp needs more careful handling, cause if you don't you lose it all.

Also do effects work better on ss vs tube?

You must think about how sound works.

Tubes react more dynamically, and dynamics has a strong influence on the human ear...generally.
An overdrive pedal generates more harmonics , and on a tube amp if you pick lighter you get less of them, where if u pick harder you gain more. This means theoretically the fx sounds more "interesting" on a tube amp.

It depends on the FX really. A delay pedal duplicates the sound, so if you like your SS based sound you get it back the same.

Phaser for example, sounds often nicer through analog, because it sweeps, and tube amps generally have more complex resonance when sweeping through it with such an effect.


On dynamics:

It's the reason why when 20 people play the same riff, maybe 1 can actually make it sound interesting. This for me is the magic of music.

Offcourse when in a band situation, the dynamics of your playing can be influenced by the bass and/or drums accentuating what you play to make it stand out more, where it can totally replace the need for dynamic guitar sound.

I can't see how people don't like a more dynamic sound, to me it's more characteristic.

But if you can't hear or have the playing ability to play dynamically, then I can see that when playing a tube amp you don't see the specialty of it.

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Jul 15, 2013,
#14
If you want to run pedals on top of a clean "base" tone, then don't go for the MG. I'd recommend looking for a nice tube amp with a good clean channel, maybe something from the Fender line, then use your pedalboard to flavor your tones from there.
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#15
TS was buying the white MG stack just for the looks.

Don't buy amps just for the looks. As people have said, clean channels sound different depending on the amp. And I have tried MG and it had pretty bad cleans.

You don't buy amps for the looks, you buy them because they sound good.
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