#1
Hi guy I'm building a studio in a 10x12 room... Needless to say I'll need serious acoustic treatment. Anyhow I was wondering where in my studio I should position these DIY bass traps and which ones would be best ( corners or panels etc ).
Thanks a lot guys!
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#2
Your desk and drums should switch places. Monitors always go against the longest wall in the room.

Bass traps in corners, ideally fully covered in each corner.

Build a cloud over the drums, that will help IMMENSELY.
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#3
He's right, you know!

Also, I'd suggest putting something absorptive (or reflective and angular) on the wall the speakers are pointing towards, to try and calm any parallel reflections that way.
#4
Alright thanks! But what do I do about the "bottom left" corner? How do I go about putting bass traps there ?
#5
Quote by Sid McCall
Your desk and drums should switch places. Monitors always go against the longest wall in the room.

Bass traps in corners, ideally fully covered in each corner.

Build a cloud over the drums, that will help IMMENSELY.


Really? I always heard that monitors should face down the length of the room?
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#6
Quote by D.R.22
Alright thanks! But what do I do about the "bottom left" corner? How do I go about putting bass traps there ?

Make the other side match by placing a trap diagonally? Symmetry isn't necessary, really.

And yes, I've read a LOT on this stuff recently as I just set up my own home studio, and the monitors should not face down the length of the room. That makes it much harder to control problem frequencies, they should have less room to travel, not more.
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#7
^Where did you read that? I've spoken to Ethan Winer several times on the subject and he always recommended shooting the speakers down the longest part of the room. Yes, early reflections will be less of an issue with them shooting down the short end, but in a small room like this, the low end is always harder to treat and the length makes for the quickest route to a neutral mix environment, since reflections are much easier to treat.

Straight from a Sound on Sound article:

in the smaller rooms many of us have to deal with, it is invariably best to have the speakers facing down the longest axis of the room. If you work across the room, the reflective wall behind you is too close and the physical size of the desk means you’re almost certainly sitting mid‑way between the wall in front and the wall behind, which causes a big bass cancellation in the exact centre and, as you’ve noticed, causes the bass end to change if you move your position even slightly


Though, surely the desk should be moved to the opposite side or the room.
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#8
Quote by MatrixClaw
^Where did you read that? I've spoken to Ethan Winer several times on the subject and he always recommended shooting the speakers down the longest part of the room. Yes, early reflections will be less of an issue with them shooting down the short end, but in a small room like this, the low end is always harder to treat and the length makes for the quickest route to a neutral mix environment, since reflections are much easier to treat.

Straight from a Sound on Sound article:



Though, surely the desk should be moved to the opposite side or the room.


Will it make a big difference? Because the door is actually closer to the "right" ( which I failed to illustrate ) therefore making it an awkward place to put the desk!
#9
Quote by Sid McCall
Make the other side match by placing a trap diagonally? Symmetry isn't necessary, really.

And yes, I've read a LOT on this stuff recently as I just set up my own home studio, and the monitors should not face down the length of the room. That makes it much harder to control problem frequencies, they should have less room to travel, not more.



More than that, symmetry is bad! The less you have, the less standing waves you get.