#1
I dont know much about music theory. But im really curious ive been trying to find an answers for a while.


So I've read that when you learn licks, dont just learn them but analyze how they are used. on what kind of chords etc etc. I know this is essential in Jazz. But my questions about blues/rock playing.

Assuming that all the chords in the progression are in the same key,

Do I really need to chose which notes are going to be played on chords? Or can i just run through the scale with my licks?
#2
You can do whatever you want. But different notes sound better over different chords. Use your ears, don't just play random notes. For example have a 12 bar blues progression in E and try E note over the E chord and then try it over A chord. Hear how different it sounds like over those chords. Try it over B chord and listen. Again, sounds different.

Also you can transpose your licks so that they fit any chord you play.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#3
Yea you can, but it's always nice to be able to land on a chord tone of the chord that is changing, or playing at the time.

You can develop this with your ear when you play over a progression many times, or have lots of practice doing it, of course, that's the long route. If you know what chords are in the song, you can easily work out the chord tones and then work out licks that will land on those tones at the right time.

Say C Dm Em. You're playing in C. You know the notes in those chords are CDEFGAB. and you know that if you land on D F or A when it lands on the Dm, it should sound pleasing.

As an example.
#4
Yes. The lick you play over the I or IV chord is typically not the best over V, and vice versa. An effective blues solo really accentuates the harmony change with each chord. Since standard Blues is just an un-subtle reduction of longer harmony forms, you need to be extra careful to play licks that lead you from one harmony to the next.

Work out which notes are in each chord and start noodling around with ONLY those 3 or 4 notes. Get a sense of melody with those basic arpeggios and then start adding in color tones (usually a half step below the chord tone).

To generate some good transition licks, pick a note from each chord you want to resolve to on the chord change. Play that note on the very first beat of each chord change. Then, come up with a lick that leads up to that change, so that you drop right into the new chord.

Example: C blues

On C7, hit C.
On F7, hit an A
On G7, hit a B.

Then, come up with a lick to play during the C7 that leads into the A that you over the F7. Do the same for each chord, including licks that lead back to the C7.
Last edited by cdgraves at Jul 14, 2013,
#5
Quote by cdgraves
Yes. The lick you play over the I or IV chord is typically not the best over V, and vice versa. An effective blues solo really accentuates the harmony change with each chord. Since standard Blues is just an un-subtle reduction of longer harmony forms, you need to be extra careful to play licks that lead you from one harmony to the next.

Work out which notes are in each chord and start noodling around with ONLY those 3 or 4 notes. Get a sense of melody with those basic arpeggios and then start adding in color tones (usually a half step below the chord tone).

To generate some good transition licks, pick a note from each chord you want to resolve to on the chord change. Play that note on the very first beat of each chord change. Then, come up with a lick that leads up to that change, so that you drop right into the new chord.

Example: C blues

On C7, hit C.
On F7, hit an A
On G7, hit a B.

Then, come up with a lick to play during the C7 that leads into the A that you over the F7. Do the same for each chord, including licks that lead back to the C7.


Thank you so much that's the answer that I've been looking for.
Does anyone know a way on how I can practice this? Like how will I know that "this" lick is good for a certain chord? Basically just how to analyze chords and notes on the licks maybe?
#6
Quote by porkplan
Thank you so much that's the answer that I've been looking for.
Does anyone know a way on how I can practice this? Like how will I know that "this" lick is good for a certain chord? Basically just how to analyze chords and notes on the licks maybe?

You just need to listen. Your ears will tell if it sounds bad or good over that chord. But you could look at the notes you play. Are there any chord tones? Do you land on a chord tone? Playing chord tones always sounds consonant. But yeah, usually you'll hear if some note doesn't work over a certain chord. Some non-chord tones work better over certain chords than others.

And how to analyze notes... Well, what's the interval between the chord root and the note you are playing? A major chord has a root, a major third, and a fifth. Those are the "safest" notes to play over a major chord. If you don't know about intervals yet, I would recommend to learn about them. Learn how different intervals sound like.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Jul 17, 2013,