#1
hey guys:
first:I have some musical knowledge.but sometimesI play some of jeff loomis stuff or chris broderick or any metal kind of solo they move from key to key without sounding bad for example jeff loomis's song jato unit great arpeggio part I think somewhere around 2:40 or something ,he plays some c# arpeggio in the key of D Major then a diminshed sweep in the key of D major too, then plays b Major sweep in the key of f# Major, my question what kind of theories did he use to change keys without sounding bad? forget about this example what is the name of that kind of theories that make you change from key to key? so I can read about it more. maybe circle of fifth or fourth or something?
#2
Are you sure he's actually changing keys? Maybe he's just changing chords. If so, then he just plays an arpeggio over the chord he's playing over at that moment.

Also, music isn't divided into different "theories". It's just music theory, and it's cumulative.
"I agree with Matthew about everything" - Everyone
#3
Modulation is the term you're looking for. But like Matt said, he's only changing chords, not keys.
I'm an
Engeneer
Enginear
Enginere

I'm Good at Math
#4
Even if the chords aren't in "key", they may simply be non-diatonic chords. If you don't know what that means, a google search should easily find a few credible sources that tell you what diatonic and non-diatonic chords are.
#6
He is probably just playing non-diatonic chords. However, assuming he's not, the 'closely related key theorem' is typically how people modulate. You find a key that is one accidental away from what you are playing and then you modulate to that key; typically by using a shared chord.
#8
Quote by griffRG7321
Why is it that only guitarists seem to be baffled by non-diatonic music...

Cos we're special
#10
Quote by griffRG7321
Why is it that only guitarists seem to be baffled by non-diatonic music...

Because only guitarists (read: guitarists who are lazy with theory) don't get the concept that a key isn't solely the 7 notes of the key signature (and chords built using those notes). It's shocking to me how many guitar players I've met who insist upon stupid things like, "Hendrix didn't know theory" (he actually did, btw) or some other such bullshit as a justification for not actually studying music theory.
#11
I think not a lot of guitarists understand non-diatonic chords because the instrument is so strong tonally and suffers from such severe limitations that they don't really consider the modulations that non-diatonic chords tend to give/lead to.
#13
Good luck overcoming the instrument itself. I moved from guitar to piano because I kept finding myself trying to play pianistic things on the piano (pure tapping and oscar peterson solos). If it could be overcome, instrument choice actually wouldn't matter.
#14
Quote by crazysam23_Atax
It's shocking to me how many guitar players I've met who insist upon stupid things like, "Hendrix didn't know theory" (he actually did, btw)

Every source I've come across says that he didn't. I don't have them now but even interviews I've read with people that played with Hendrix confirmed he didn't know music theory. So I would be interested to know what biography/interview/article or whatever you were reading that says Hendrix studied/knew music theory.

Of course you could always argue that what it means to "know/learn music theory" is something different than what we generally accept it to mean. If this is the case I would like to see how you make that claim true without your post becoming deceptive and misleading due to inconsistencies in the application of what it means to "know/learn theory".
Si