#1
Hi,
first of all I hope this is the right section. If this is the wrong section I apologize for this.

So, I'm 22 and I'm a guitarist, we play metalcore, deathcore, hc and when we play for reasons of space, until now I stayed between my and the other guitar amp..

Every time is a massacre for my ears.


Every practice they ringing and I've lost hearing, I hope just a little bit.

This had become a problem about everyday.

In this moment I've difficult to hear someone tells me at 4-5 meters if he/she speaks to low volume and there are folks are talking near.

In addition, I must say this is really a problem when a girl speaks to me during a party with high music. We talk near the ear but sometime I need she repeats what has said.


It's no nice..


Now I move near the exit door when we play and and I've tried to play with a few cotton wool in my ears.
It works but I no more heard all sound hues. However I think I'm going to continue to use them because without ears ringing until to hear distorted, the latter just after finished to play.

I need advices especially to recover hearing and how to protect ears during practice and gigs.

Thanks in advance for availability guys !
#2
Dude i feel bad for you but just think on the good side you wont be able to hear your girfriend when she is arguing with you about how you dont care for her lol !!
This will be hard but dont do as many gigs you dont want to lose your hearing.
Go to the doctors and have it checked out.

Sorry man im not going to win any awards for being helpfull !!!!!!
#3
Sudden damage to hearing tends to recover in few days but when the damage occurs due to constant abuse, its permanent. The ringing ears mean the hair cells inside your ear are damaged in that particular frequency and are sending false signal to your brain which interprets it as ringing sound. That also means the sensitivity of your hearing on those frequencies is reduced, if not become completely deaf to them.

Go see the audiologist/ear doctor. Most likely he will tell you the same thing I did, but if there something else wrong instead of actual hearing damage it could be fixable. Maybe.

We have only one pair of ears for the rest of our lives, always wear protection during concerts. To prevent any further damage get these:
http://www.etymotic.com/hp/er20.html
Ear plugs that attenuates sound without dulling it. (or so it attempts).

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Last edited by MaaZeus at Jul 14, 2013,
#4
Oh man, I know exactly how you feel. Back when I was in university I had a part time job at a night club. The next day it was always hell to talk to people, I'd have to ask them to repeat themselves over and over again.

Get some real ear plugs if it's gonna be a regular thing.
#6
I got my earplugs for £5, and I never play with others without them. It cuts out all the overbearing volume and actually means I can hear the band better! Get some earplugs ASAP. Mine are something like Hearos, but any decent pair will do
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#7
There's a company called Proguard that I use. Best earplugs I've ever used, and I've used a few.

If you have the money, I can't recommend these enough:
http://www.proguarduk.co.uk/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=30

They're custom fitted, comfy as hell, and if you get the 33db attenuators you could stand next to a jet all day and have no damage. Because they're attenuators, not normal plugs, they don't dull the sound, only reduce it. I find it's even better at gigs as you don't get a lot of distortion from the speakers. If you think 33db might be too much protection, you can swap out the filters.

If this is out of your budget, they do noizezz. Basically the same product, except you get get the filters, and four sizes of generic plugs. It'll do the job, but they aren't as comfy. Great fot noisy pubs or clubs though.

When they're in both kinds are invisible, if that's an issue..
#8
Definitely get some earplugs, I use them when I go to shows or when practicing for a long period of time. Also it can help level everything out in the mix brings everything down and you can hear all the parts better and if you can't you can raise the volume on like the bass or if toms aren't making it through. People like Paul Gilbert and the guitar player from Linkin Park wear complete over ear headphones, probably noise cancelling and use them as there monitors during shows. Takes a lil of the edge off in a hc band but hearing doesn't heal it degrades over time.
#9
+1 to everyone, it sucks but generally your ears accumulate damage

Saying that handy for some, my grandad can shoot a shotgun and hear little :p
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#10
Younger guys are not made with "real men parts" any more. I think the majority of you have vag's.

Stop playing so loud and get some good ear-plus not just the cheap ones in the store. They make some that are designed to keep all the frequency's audible unlike most that cut lots of bass and highs. You hearing is not worth screwing around in a practice space and ruining it, if you were famous at least you'd have money.

You do know if you and the rest of your band EQ right and set your levels correctly you can sound great at lower volumes

Or start playing Neil Diamond/James Taylor stuff
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#11
i always and will always use my hearing protection during rehearsals and gigs. hope your hearing finds comfort soon.
#12
I have a set of over-ear protectors that I picked up for the gun range years ago that I take along whenever I'm visiting a newb band practice. They look like the ones you see on deck crews on aircraft carriers. Newb band members usually don't have any feel for orchestration; they all play all the time with no dynamics at all, so the result is simply wall of noise. If you want to hear anything at all distinctly, you have to drop the volume several 10's of dB <G>.

At one point I spent about $5K to get an electronic drum set that three different drummers could agree on. At this point, aside from the vocals, all you hear during practice (without the IEMs) is tappity tappity tink tink (we've got one set of percussion that's still all acoustic and miked) . I've got Sony 7506's for visitors and they can set their own volumes. Between the preamps/modelers/DI's/keyboards and the electronic drums, it's a quiet space. Except for the vocal yelling, we could probably practice next to a sleeping baby.
#13
Quote by Robbgnarly
Y You hearing is not worth screwing around in a practice space and ruining it, if you were famous at least you'd have money.

You do know if you and the rest of your band EQ right and set your levels correctly you can sound great at lower volumes


Stunningly good advice. Neal Schon has tinnitus. His array of five 4x12s facing forward (and one facing backward) was his rig for years with Journey, and when he's not touring with them, he's got some other project going. But he says the Journey rig isn't solely responsible for the hearing woes; Steve Perry used to have four vocal monitors aimed down at the band from the overhead rigging and they blasted louder than anything, he says. And years of riding loud Harleys has probably taken even more of a toll.

He has money. But he can't hear when his girlfriend is picking his pocket for some of it <G>.
#14
I would never play at band volume without my earplugs. I never go to a concert without earplugs either. I would feel extremely uncomfortable if I did. I wouldn't be able to be in the same room as a drummer while he is playing without earplugs.

What I am a bit concerned about is more listening to music on the bus or train. It is so easy to raise the volume when there is so much noise around you, not even in-ear helps with it.

When hearing is gone - it's gone. Protect it.

Even if it's just £5 ear-plugs that you reuse or the yellow heavy duty foam ones - they are something.

(And you can play music with heavy duty foam earplugs. Bruce Dickinson of Iron Maiden use them, and he is arguably on the most accomplished in the industry.)
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Last edited by HomerSGR at Jul 14, 2013,
#15
Thanks to everybody guys !

For the moment I'm using simple cotton wool in my ears and it works: finally I no hear noise and distortion in my ears at the end of practises. And of course, I hear everything less but certainly more distinct, clear. However I'm going to buy earplugs to listen to the difference with cotton wool.


Quote by Robbgnarly
Younger guys are not made with "real men parts" any more. I think the majority of you have vag's.

Stop playing so loud and get some good ear-plus not just the cheap ones in the store. They make some that are designed to keep all the frequency's audible unlike most that cut lots of bass and highs. You hearing is not worth screwing around in a practice space and ruining it, if you were famous at least you'd have money.

You do know if you and the rest of your band EQ right and set your levels correctly you can sound great at lower volumes

Or start playing Neil Diamond/James Taylor stuff



Have you a link about these earplugs ?
#16
Personally I wouldn't trust cotton in my ears for protecting my hearing.

I'd think most music stores- brick & mortar or online- sell musician' earplugs. Either the cheap mashable plugs or the higher end ones will do a much better job.

Personally, I've been using rifleman's plugs for decades- they cost about $20-50.
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Last edited by dannyalcatraz at Jul 21, 2013,
#17
Quote by dannyalcatraz
Personally I wouldn't trust cotton in my ears for protecting my hearing.

I'd think most music stores- brick & mortar or online- sell musician' earplugs. Either the cheap mashable plugs or the higher end ones will do a much better job.

Personally, I've been using rifleman's plugs for decades- they cost about $20-50.

About cotton I know, they are only for the moment. Thanks for the comment
#18
Quote by mikitarrist
Do you a link about these earplugs ?

Here you go man

www.musiciansfriend.com/accessories/macks-hear-plugs-high-fidelity-ear-plugs

If your not in the USA, they do ship to other countries also
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
#19
Turn down the ****ing volume! Playing at absurd volumes doesn’t make you cooler, over heavier, or more metal. It just damages the hearing of the people in the front row and reminds everyone else why they stand back when young idiots are on stage. If you play a venue that’s so big you really need to crank the volume then you should just mic up and play though the PA system. This isn’t 1960. There’s no reason to stand in front of a cranked monster amp. Master volumes and high gain preamps were invented for a reason.
#20
Quote by Robbgnarly
Here you go man

www.musiciansfriend.com/accessories/macks-hear-plugs-high-fidelity-ear-plugs

If your not in the USA, they do ship to other countries also



Thanks Robbgnarly ! what do you think about this one ?http://www.musiciansfriend.com/accessories/hearos-skull-screws-ear-plugs

I see the Hearos NRR is 30 while mack's 12. They are protectiver than Mack's or am I wrong?