#1
So I've been thinking of replacing my Epiphone humbuckers with something a bit more elegant, but Im not really sure if its worth it, so I was wondering if someone could explain if there is a significant difference in sound quality. I play a lot of soft/classic rock, blues rock and a lot of psychedelic 70s rock. I have an Epiphone explorer I think its from around the 90s and a Vox VT80+

What do you think the best pickup is? (humbucker)
#2
Replacing pick ups wobt do much with your amp not saying epiphones cant ve great guitars with a pup swap especially some of the higher end ones
But you wont notice too much of a difference through a solid state modeling amp( whuch if i rememeber correctly you amp is)
#3
Quote by Soapy Dishes
So I've been thinking of replacing my Epiphone humbuckers with something a bit more elegant, but Im not really sure if its worth it, so I was wondering if someone could explain if there is a significant difference in sound quality. I play a lot of soft/classic rock, blues rock and a lot of psychedelic 70s rock. I have an Epiphone explorer I think its from around the 90s and a Vox VT80+

What do you think the best pickup is? (humbucker)


If you have a mid-budget to higher end tube amp, say a Peavey Classic 30 - I would say that you would certainly benefit from a pickup change. The guitar certainly should be good enough. However, having played my own Vox Valvetronix, for a couple of years before upgrading, and other cheap modeling amps in the same range - I suggest you put the money towards a better amp.

This isn't due to the Vox being a very bad amp, but rather that there is very little change in sound between guitars on budget modeling amps, in my experience.
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#4
Pretty much what they have said is right- you'll hear more of a difference between pickups and guitars in general when using a tube amp.

That said, if the guitar is comfy to you and is generally well made, go for it! I have a Dean EVO that is surprisingly good, but it has terrible pickups in it. So this year, I'm putting in some nice custom wounds from Vintage Vibe.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
Last edited by dannyalcatraz at Jul 15, 2013,
#5
A friend borrowed a pedal off me a while back and when he returned it he gave me the original pickups from his Gibson LP (having swapped them for Alnico Pro IIs).

When I find a decent used Epiphone Dot I plan on swapping out the stock pickups for the Gibsons. I'll also upgrade the pots, too.
It's an opinion. It's subjective. And I'm right, anyway.
#6
As was already stated, pickups can make a huge difference, though not typically through a modeling amp. Case in point: Several years ago my younger brother and I both received new guitars for Christmas. He was given an Epi LP Studio, and I an Epi G400. I, being the gear vvhore that I am, quickly modded my G400 with a couple of nice Dimarzios ( a PAF Pro neck/ Breed bridge, but that is beside the point). When played through my Peavey C50, the difference was stunning. Harmonically rich notes and chords, much better note definition and clarity, warmth, bite, grind, everything was better than with the stock pickups in his LP. Through his Cube 30, though, almost no discernible difference. My G400 was a bit louder, a tiny bit less muddy when using gain, and that was it. For me, totally worth the upgrade. For him, not without a better amp to go with it. Same for you, unfortunately.
#7
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
Last edited by dannyalcatraz at Jul 15, 2013,