#1
Hey, I'm planing to buy my first electric guitar. I'll be playing lots AC/DC and some blues and jazzy songs. I'm looking for a guitar in the price range of 300$-750$. I'm thinking of a Fender Standard Stratocaster. I live in Egypt so I wil buy it online so I don' have the chance to try many guitars. What do you guys think I should get and what is the best guitar for a beginner. Thanks.
#2
Based upon what you have said regarding blues & AC/DC a Strat wouldn't be ideal. Not a standard (with three single coil pickups).

You should probably look towards humbucker-loaded guitars.

If that means nothing to you, think of Gibsons vs. Fenders (generally).

A singlecoil looks like this, usually:


and a humbucker is more:



The best advice I can offer is to go to a local retailer and try as many guitars as possible in your price range until you find one that is comfortable, gives you the sound you desire and looks appealing to you. If you can't play at all, or are worried, take someone who can with you.
It's an opinion. It's subjective. And I'm right, anyway.
#3
HSS Strat or an Epiphone Les Paul
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#4
if he wants to play ac\dc just get an ephiphone sg?
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#5
An Epiphone SG is a great suggestion- it has the humbuckers typical for hard rock in general, and in particular, it is based on the Gibson guitar that Angus Young plays in AC/DC.

The Godin Redline HB is a guitar that regularly sells for $499, new. It is made in Canada, and Godin generally makes good guitars.

Like the SG, it has 2 humbuckers. Its shape, though, is more like the Strat you were contemplating. If you find that kind of bodystyle comfortable or appealing, it might be a better choice.
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#6
If your budget is $300-700 and you want an epiphone sg, you could spend a bit more and get one of their high-end models, like the SG Custom.
#7
If you're just starting then don't spend any big amount of money like on a strat or Gibson, you might not continue, my first guitar was an Epiphone Les Paul 100 and i think it's a great first guitar but for you it has to be an Epiphone SG probably the G400, very good beginner guitar
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#8
I dunno man, I would not recommend buying a cheapo guitar as the first one. An epiphone sg-400 with nothing special to recommend it is probably a little too close to a beginner guitar. If you spend Gibson money on a Gibson and don't like it, some musician will be only too happy to take it off your hands and give you most of what you paid.
#9
Epiphone G-400 is probably the best "beginner" guitar for that kind of music. Although with $750 you could probably get a Gibson if you look in the right places. Being in Egypt, I'm not sure where those places would be, so I'd say get the G400 and a good amp.

Get the G400 Pro. It has coil splitting so you could pull off the strat sound and still have all the good stuff humbuckers give you.
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Last edited by jjfeu662 at Jul 15, 2013,
#10
agreed on the humbucker thing- ac/dc is pretty much all humbuckers, and jazz is frequently a neck humbucker, too. blues can go either way. you could probably do a lot worse than one of the better epiphones.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

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#11
Thank you guys for the suggestions but I'm looking for a versatile guitar that won't limit me to type of music since I want to experiment and play lots of things. is the Epiphone G-400 that someone suggested above versatile?? btw I'm not new to guitars I've been playing an acoustic for 2 and a half years with a Fender T-bucket (my first guitar) and now I have a Taylor
#12
Versatility depends on a lot of factors, most notably your amp and pedals.

But when it comes to guitars and "versatility", many people think in terms of mixing pickup types.

Commonly, that's a Strat type guitar with a humbucker and a pair of singlecoils (HSS) or 2 HBs and a singlecoil in the middle (HSH). But there are all kinds of mixes builders have come up with for all kinds of body styles.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#13
The G-400 is basically a cheaper version of a Gibson SG. Users include Angus Young, Tony Iommi and Frank Zappa. So yeah, I'd say it's versatile.
Tomorrow will take us away
Far from home
No one will ever know our names
But the bards' songs will remain
Tomorrow will take it away
The fear of today
It will be gone
Due to our magic songs

ALL HAIL CELESTIA
#14
The G400 has like 5 or 6 different tone knobs you can play with, and that's not even mentioning your amp or if you get a model with coil splitting. It has versatility. Be warned that many do not like the stock pickups (unless you get a deluxe model with good pups), so you may want to change them.
#15
A humbucker equipped guitar can be plenty versatile enough. Especially something that has the same basic layout as a Gibson – i.e – two humbuckers with a dedicated tone and volume pot for each. With reasonably medium output pickups you can cover anything from the likes of blues, hard rock, punk, jazz, grunge, stoner rock through to indie, jangle-type stuff and even metal (although for the more modern stuff you’d probably need a decent overdrive / distortion unit in between to up the gain enough).

I was merely going by what TS said initially as to what their influences and aims were and using that as a starting point.
It's an opinion. It's subjective. And I'm right, anyway.
#16
As i was telling someone else, I own a Fernandes Ravelle Elite and I love it. A great hard rock/metal guitar, but out of your price range.

However, they have entry-level versions of almost all their guitars, designated with an "X" after the model name. I haven't played any, but they seem to get decent reviews. They are about $399 or so.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
Last edited by dannyalcatraz at Jul 16, 2013,
#17
Maybe semi-acoustic electric guitar? There is some cheaper models by Squier I think.
#18
I'd say Epiphone G400.
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#19
Quote by dannyalcatraz
Versatility depends on a lot of factors, most notably your amp and pedals.

But when it comes to guitars and "versatility", many people think in terms of mixing pickup types.

Commonly, that's a Strat type guitar with a humbucker and a pair of singlecoils (HSS) or 2 HBs and a singlecoil in the middle (HSH). But there are all kinds of mixes builders have come up with for all kinds of body styles.


+1

I'd say that lower output humbuckers like in the epi should be fairly versatile, but you won't be getting any single coil tones out of it. that being said, you could add coil splits later (though you might have to buy new humbuckers to do it).
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#20
What kind of amp and pedals are you currently using? That will be an important factor in the tonal versatility you can achieve.

I see the G-400 has been recommended repeatedly in this thread and it's not a bad choice. I've played one (it did play well), but I can't really remember much about the pickups. Dave says they're fairly low output (and Dave knows his stuffs!), so based on that it should be able to provide a nice variety of tones provided you have an appropriate amp and pedals to help accomplish the task.

A Fat Strat would also be a good option as well. The humbucker in the bridge position would provide the crunchy rock tones and the singles would be good for the blues and jazz sounds you desire. Plus, if you decide to swap to a humbucker in the neck position there are plenty of options out there for single-spaced-humbuckers.
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#21
Quote by Dave_Mc
+1

I'd say that lower output humbuckers like in the epi should be fairly versatile, but you won't be getting any single coil tones out of it. that being said, you could add coil splits later (though you might have to buy new humbuckers to do it).


G400 Pro has coil tapping. I'm not sure what the difference is, but it has something to do with turning humbuckers into singles.
Tomorrow will take us away
Far from home
No one will ever know our names
But the bards' songs will remain
Tomorrow will take it away
The fear of today
It will be gone
Due to our magic songs

ALL HAIL CELESTIA
#22
^ oh if the pro already has coil splitting then it'd be worth considering (assuming it's not loads more money). Coil splits don't normally sound as good as "real" single coils, but they're better than nothing if you have no other way of getting single coil-type tones.

Quote by sjones

I've played one (it did play well), but I can't really remember much about the pickups. Dave says they're fairly low output (and Dave knows his stuffs!), so based on that it should be able to provide a nice variety of tones provided you have an appropriate amp and pedals to help accomplish the task.


thanks for the kind words, but i was just kinda assuming they were pretty low output
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?