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#1
Hey UG Pit,

Out of nowhere, I've realised I want to listen to some Jazz. Besides some more "jazzy" tracks by Ray Charles and Frank Sinatra, a few stuff by Nat King Cole and some ocasional random Jazz Fusion, I don't really know much about it.

Any ideas to where I should start?
#3
1. stop referring to things as "jazzy"

2. Charlie Parker


Quote by darkcheef
Miles Davis, Coltrane, the list could go on....

It could go on, but it should not start at Coltrane.

...modes and scales are still useless.


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#5
Quote by The Madcap
Hey, that can be a very useful adjective.

Extremely useful for inducing cringe.

...modes and scales are still useless.


Quote by PhoenixGRM
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#7
ahmad jamal, mingus, ornette coleman seem like a few okay starting points


and davis, coltrane, the list could go on..
#8
Django Reindhart Joe Pass
Quote by SlackerBabbath
My ideal woman would be a grossly overweight woman who would happy go jogging, come home all sweaty and let me put my dick under her armpit while she shuffles a pack of cards.

Stay classy, pit.
#10
Quote by darkcheef
Miles Davis, Coltrane, the list could go on....


Thought about those names, and I guess they're probably the most obvious ones to start. If you have any more suggestions, please do.

Quote by Xiaoxi
stop referring to things as "jazzy"
I guess I should just write "something that sound similar enough to Jazz to be referenced as Jazz but really isn't Jazz", then.
Last edited by Lightning_Ray at Jul 15, 2013,
#11
Listen to a few interpretations of the standards like Autumn Leaves, Moanin', Bag's Groove, My Favorite Things, and etc. If you find one cover/interpretation you like look more into that band/artist.

Here's a really good OST with some really good covers of the standards. Some are originals and 1 or 2 aren't Jazz though.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1meKNnmO318&list=PLC2A7E6075243ACB6
Last edited by NothingRocks at Jul 15, 2013,
#12
Quote by Thrashtastic15
ahmad jamal, mingus, ornette coleman seem like a few okay starting points


and davis, coltrane, the list could go on..
Think I've heard Ornette Coleman somewhere...

Quote by Masquirina
for old time's sake I highly recommend visiting a jazz section in one of the few remaining book/cd stores and listening to whatever is featured on their headphone thingy. Then buy at least one thing and sit down with an italian soda and five different foreign 20 dollar magazines you're not buying

analog stuff 1996-2008 never forget (sky fistbump)

edit - unless you actually have important things to do
More important than drinking an italian soda? Who does?!

Quote by NothingRocks
Listen to a few interpretations of the standards like Autumn Leaves, Moanin', Bag's Groove, My Favorite Things, and etc. If you find one cover/interpretation you like look more into that band/artist.

Here's a really good OST with some really good covers of the standards. Some are originals and 1 or 2 aren't Jazz though.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1meKNnmO318&list=PLC2A7E6075243ACB6
I'll give it a go then.

Quote by willT08
You can wank for free, who needs Jazz?
Wanking gets old and boring pretty fast.
#13
Quote by Lightning_Ray

Wanking gets old and boring pretty fast.

What on earth are you talking about?
#14
Coleman Hawkins and Lester Young are great. They're a good way to get into more complex Bop stuff because they influenced Charlie Parker.

Benny Goodman, Artie Shaw, and Chick Webb are great for Swing.

Charlie Christian, Joe Pass and Wes Montgomery for jazz guitar.

Louis Armstrong is mind boggling, so listen to that.

Sidney Bechet, King Oliver and Buddy Bolden are some of the first jazz players.

Duke Ellington, Charles Mingus, Jelly Roll Morton, Herbie Hancock are some great jazz composers.

Fats Waller, Art Tatum and Thelonious Monk are jazz piano.

So that should keep you busy. I'm leaving people out of course, like a Dexter Gordon, Dizzy Gillespie...
#15
Quote by Lightning_Ray
Hey UG Pit,

Out of nowhere, I've realised I want to listen to some Jazz. Besides some more "jazzy" tracks by Ray Charles and Frank Sinatra, a few stuff by Nat King Cole and some ocasional random Jazz Fusion, I don't really know much about it.

Any ideas to where I should start?
Sure, get Swing Shift by Rik Emmett.

It contains at least one song of all the different forms of Jazz. From Bebop, Swing, Acid, Waltz, Cool, Free, Acoustic, Lounge, Smooth, etc...

You will never need another Jazz album...
Last edited by AllJudasPriest at Jul 15, 2013,
#16
Try some Dizzy Gillespie.. get his live album 'At Newport' if you can
#17
What's all this jazz about?

I'm not sure how funny that was...
Tomorrow will take us away
Far from home
No one will ever know our names
But the bards' songs will remain
Tomorrow will take it away
The fear of today
It will be gone
Due to our magic songs

ALL HAIL CELESTIA
#19
Quote by Duaneclapdrix
Coleman Hawkins and Lester Young are great. They're a good way to get into more complex Bop stuff because they influenced Charlie Parker.

Benny Goodman, Artie Shaw, and Chick Webb are great for Swing.

Charlie Christian, Joe Pass and Wes Montgomery for jazz guitar.

Louis Armstrong is mind boggling, so listen to that.

Sidney Bechet, King Oliver and Buddy Bolden are some of the first jazz players.

Duke Ellington, Charles Mingus, Jelly Roll Morton, Herbie Hancock are some great jazz composers.

Fats Waller, Art Tatum and Thelonious Monk are jazz piano.

So that should keep you busy. I'm leaving people out of course, like a Dexter Gordon, Dizzy Gillespie...
Finally, someone gets it right.

Listing the more advanced jazz artists for your vanity / "street cred" is so counterproductive. Hopefully PrimusFan can come in with that story about John Coltrane not listening to John Coltrane to learn.

If you don't get the essential language and philosophy of jazz, aka the guys in my quote, all that stuff about Coltrane and Ornette Coleman will fly right over your head.

...modes and scales are still useless.


Quote by PhoenixGRM
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Quote by PhoenixGRM
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#20
If you want something more accessable with vocals, Buena Vista Social Club is definitly worth listening to, swinging cuban jazz if the name didn't give it away. Check out their self-titled album.

If you want something a bit edgier and more artsy then I'd highly recommend Time Out by Dave Brubeck Quartet, a legendary record with tunes you may already be familiar with and not even know it. If nothing else you must listen to the song 'Blue Rondo a la Turk', truly brilliant tune inspired by Turkish musicians, written in 9/8 and yet handled seemingly effortlessly.
Vinland, Vinland Über Alles

"Why do they still call me a warlord? And mad? All I want to do is create the perfect genetic soldier!"
#22
I know it's cliche, but I really think Kind of Blue by Miles Davis is a great place to start. It seems to be pretty accessible to most new jazz fans. The forms are simple, and the solos are great.


There is sooo much good jazz, really just check out anyone that you can and you will find out what you like.
#23
Quote by Xiaoxi
Listing the more advanced jazz artists for your vanity / "street cred" is so counterproductive. Hopefully PrimusFan can come in with that story about John Coltrane not listening to John Coltrane to learn.


if you insist...

Quote by Branford Marsalis
Well, that’s what everybody was doing back then in the ’80s. You become a product of your environment. I was out there playing with Wynton’s band: I’m an R&B saxophone player, I have no ****in’ idea how to play jazz. Before that, I’m at Berklee and I’m listening to all of these guys playing all this fast stuff, and the question I had was, “If all of this shit is so good, then how come it doesn’t sound as good as the stuff from 30 years before?”

And since I couldn’t have that discussion with anyone, then I had to figure it out on my own, just asking questions, talking to Art Blakey, talking to Benny Golson, talking to Dizzy Gillespie. I would just say, “What did y’all listen to when you were growing up?” And one of the constants was, “Church music and rhythm and blues.” But the modern jazz guys of my generation basically did neither, with few exceptions. In Dizzy’s day, you had 15-year-old kids playing in church bands or playing in rhythm-and-blues bands or swing-based dance bands, which were groove bands. But in modern times you got 15-year-old kids learning “Giant Steps” at jazz camp. So I basically had to catch up to all of this stuff and learn. And it took a while.

I was trying to play like Coltrane in Blakey’s band, and one day Blakey walks by and says, “What the fuck are you doing?” I said, “I’m trying to play like Coltrane,” and he said, “No, you’re not!” And so I sarcastically said back to him, “Oh, so the best way to learn how to play like Coltrane is to not listen to Coltrane, right?” And he says, “Well, let me ask you this: When Coltrane was your age, what the fuck do you think he was listening to, tapes of himself in the future? You dumb motherfucker!” And he walked off. And he left me with it. And that’s the thing that was great about him. Whether it was because he was emotionally detached or because he just instinctively knew, who knows?

But the thing is, he understood—although he wouldn’t have said it this way—that regardless of the kind of profession you’re in, whether it’s sports or music or whether you make typewriters, it don’t matter. The two things that you have to develop on your own are cognition and intuition. Teachers have basically supplied the students with cognition. But in the manner in which they do it, intuition doesn’t bloom. So when Art Blakey dropped that turd on my head, he walked away and left me to sort that shit out. So an hour later I walked up to him and I said, “So when Coltrane was a kid, what was he listening to?” And he says, “Ah, that’s the question! Ask Benny Golson.” So I called Benny and Benny says, “Oh, yes, young man, you might find this very interesting. Who do you think was Coltrane’s first major influence?” And I said Charlie Parker. And he says, “That wasn’t it. It was Johnny Hodges.” I mean, who can put that together?

So then I had to hold my nose and start listening to Duke Ellington. Because, you know, I didn’t come here for his shit. But if these old ****ers say that this is what it is, then alright, I’ll have to endure this. So then, after about two or three weeks of listening to Duke records, suddenly you realize, “Man, these cats are amazing!” Because it reminded me of what I learned how to do on R&B gigs. There were a couple of club owners in New Orleans who said, “Man, you cats play too many fuckin’ notes. And if y’all won’t learn how to play this music the right way, we just won’t hire you.” That gets it home. Note to self: less notes! And once you start getting into the idea of what R&B really is, then it’s beautiful. But if your appreciation of music is always on the periphery of it, which means that your entire study of the music is totally based on harmonic analysis, then funk is a zero. You know, F7th for four minutes and 25 seconds is nothing, if your study of music is totally based on harmonic analysis. But if you can suspend that part of your brain and hear what they’re doing and what makes it effective, then James Brown is suddenly the genius that he is.
#DTWD
#24
^^ my nig

...modes and scales are still useless.


Quote by PhoenixGRM
Hey guys could you spare a minute to Vote for my band. Go to the site Search our band Listana with CTRL+F for quick and vote Thank you .
Quote by sam b
Voted for Patron Çıldırdı.

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Quote by PhoenixGRM
But our Band is Listana
#26
Go listen to Ella Fitzgerald
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
#27
TS, while i advocate listening to the music chronologically, you just have to listen to a bunch of different stuff til something strikes you and you get the jazz bug. one album i particularly remember being big for me was this one:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PtDs3bF88Bk

it's pretty accessible if you're coming from conventional pop music. people give vocal jazz a lot of crap because they think it's cool to. the difference between good jazz and great jazz is how vocal the players are in their phrasing, inflections, etc. also check out this wonderful ballads album:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DJCfmcUgT6U

i realize the irony since we were just saying don't try to be coltrane right off the bat. but stuff like this and the first miles quintet are cool by me for someone trying to get the hang of jazz. we're mainly saying don't dive straight into "giant steps" and "a love supreme." in my opinion workin' with the miles davis quintet might be the quintessential jazz album:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EJQv0dT_6Ls

but then again, the quintessential player might have been louis armstrong. it's really timeless. some of it sounds old and hokey. but once you get past that, most of the stuff he plays is still really hip. i play licks all the time and then realize "oh, that's from this louis armstrong solo."

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wFzxo-XI8As
#DTWD
Last edited by primusfan at Jul 16, 2013,
#28
Mulatu Astatke - Ethiopiques Vol. 4

thank me later.
Listen. I'm sorry.
#29
Get a basic understanding of the history of jazz so you don't get lost. All the names and styles and such can get confusing with no context.
^^The above is a Cryptic Metaphor^^


"To know the truth of history is to realize its ultimate myth and its inevitable ambiguity." Everything is made up and the facts don't matter.


MUSIC THEORY LINK
#30
Guess I'll have a lot of research to do, thanks everyone.

About that Coltrane story... wiser words have never been spoken, it makes perfect sense in any music genre.
#32
Start with Herbie Hancock, Allan Holdsworth, and George Benson.

Later move to the more advanced stuff like Django Reindhart.


EDIT: Oh yeah, and Ornette Coleman. Cant' forget about him.
Last edited by Ian_the_fox at Jul 16, 2013,
#33
If you want to hear some straight-ahead stuff, check out John Lewis and his work with the modern jazz quartet.

Horace Silver is the shit as well.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Trfl9fdaIIE

or Sonny Rollins

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yIlpEnsa2d8

Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers are an excellently accessible and colourful introduction to jazz, and their tunes translate surprisingly well onto guitar:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sqCSkx0vics


Anyway, I'd recommend you check out hard bop. It's a synthesis of all that I love about american music, with roots in blues, swing, gospel, and borrows elements of funk and so on. It's capable of being catchy and virtuosic at the same time, while not being as alienating as bebop can sometimes be.
Last edited by TooktheAtrain at Jul 16, 2013,
#34
Legends of Jazz is a brilliant collection of jazz artists from many backgrounds:

http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=Legends+of+jazz&oq=Legends+of+jazz&gs_l=youtube.3..0l10.27.2218.0.3186.13.8.0.1.1.1.372.1653.0j5j1j2.8.0...0.0...1ac.1.11.youtube.z1FWes0pgBs

You have the likes of Chick Corea, to Marcus Miller/Lee Ritenour, to Clark Terry. Watch the PBS Legends of Jazz vids, you'll find something you like out of the broad range showcased.
#36
Kenny G.........................joking, you should check out some Tribal Tech
JUST ANOTHER ANNOYING BIG STATUS
#38





Some fusion:




Quote by Jackal58

That's an absolute lie. That place has been abandoned for centuries.
Last edited by Butt Rayge at Jul 16, 2013,
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