#1
It took me a while to realize that when someone listens to a piece of music they don’t necessarily hear the same things I do. I learned this fact when I gave bandmates a piece of music to learn by listening to it. They didn’t always hear the same details in the song. Things like dynamics, rhythm accents, and even the general groove of the song may not be “heard” by others.

This is no fault of theirs. Hearing the details in a song’s arrangement is a learning process. It takes time and hard listening until you get it.

Now this becomes problematic when I want someone to learn a new song or a new part. I usually hope that they can “hear” what I want them to play so that it won’t take as much rehearsal time to learn the song.

But sometimes when I say, “leave a little space after that G# note” they don’t know what I’m saying even though it seemed clear to me on the recording I gave them.

Inevitably I have to breakdown the song and go over the recording until they “get” what I’m talking about during a rehearsal session. That’s just the way it is… no big deal. That’s what rehearsing is all about anyways.

So how do you teach your bandmates a new song?
#2
Use note values and articulation terms like a civilized person.
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brot pls
#4
You just need to make sure everyone is on the same page and only go as fast as your slowest learner. And try to let frustration stay out of the process for best results.
#7
I dunno the stuff we play isnt that rhythmically complex. I usually start playing it and everyone just tags along. I think its called jamming? Might be a soft j?
#8
No no no! Don't accent the up beat! Accent the up beat.
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Why would you spend tens of thousands of dollars to learn about a language you already speak? It was over before it even started dude

Quote by captainsnazz
brot pls
#9
Quote by goest
Control freak TS is control freak.

This! The point with a band is that everyone gives something to the music due to the way they play. When playing covers, that is what makes it sound like your band and not a copy of the original. And even if your talking original songs, they don't necessarily get worse if you let the others give their touch to the song.
If you really feel you're so perfect as a songwriter that no one can play anything anyway but exactly how you wrote it, then get better musicians around you or do it all yourself and just have a 'live band'.
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#10
Quote by HoneyboyHart
It took me a while to realize that when someone listens to a piece of music they don’t necessarily hear the same things I do. I learned this fact when I gave bandmates a piece of music to learn by listening to it. They didn’t always hear the same details in the song. Things like dynamics, rhythm accents, and even the general groove of the song may not be “heard” by others.

This is no fault of theirs. Hearing the details in a song’s arrangement is a learning process. It takes time and hard listening until you get it.

Now this becomes problematic when I want someone to learn a new song or a new part. I usually hope that they can “hear” what I want them to play so that it won’t take as much rehearsal time to learn the song.

But sometimes when I say, “leave a little space after that G# note” they don’t know what I’m saying even though it seemed clear to me on the recording I gave them.

Inevitably I have to breakdown the song and go over the recording until they “get” what I’m talking about during a rehearsal session. That’s just the way it is… no big deal. That’s what rehearsing is all about anyways.

So how do you teach your bandmates a new song?


You control what they do down to the dynamics?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w5BjCe0zA8Q
#12
Solution: Join a tribute band. God, this post makes me want to hit you. If you want to be in a band that covers songs by artists to a T then join a TRIBUTE band.
#13
Quote by HoneyboyHart
It took me a while to realize that when someone listens to a piece of music they don’t necessarily hear the same things I do. I learned this fact when I gave bandmates a piece of music to learn by listening to it. They didn’t always hear the same details in the song. Things like dynamics, rhythm accents, and even the general groove of the song may not be “heard” by others.

This is no fault of theirs. Hearing the details in a song’s arrangement is a learning process. It takes time and hard listening until you get it.

Now this becomes problematic when I want someone to learn a new song or a new part. I usually hope that they can “hear” what I want them to play so that it won’t take as much rehearsal time to learn the song.

But sometimes when I say, “leave a little space after that G# note” they don’t know what I’m saying even though it seemed clear to me on the recording I gave them.

Inevitably I have to breakdown the song and go over the recording until they “get” what I’m talking about during a rehearsal session. That’s just the way it is… no big deal. That’s what rehearsing is all about anyways.

So how do you teach your bandmates a new song?



I had the good fortune to work with a very talented artist for a chunk of years in my 30s and I learned a lot about what you're talking about from him. All of us learned our parts and showed up at rehearsal to put new songs together as a band and it was HIS vision of the song we adapted our parts to. Leadership isn't about one guy giving orders and everyone else following orders. - it was his name, his songs, his voice, so his vision, and we trusted his talents and experience enough to adapt our playing to suit what was best for the band and for the song.

I like that you seem to have clear in your head all the parts and how they should fit together. Believe in yourself and practice communicating your vision with your bandmates in a way that doesn't diminish their own talents and ideas. Don't be afraid to tell a drummer not use the china so damned much ( honestly what happened with one drummer) or to take the dynamics down in verse 2 or the bass player to play the fill from the CD instead of whatever it is he thought sounds better. And so on......

Good luck!!
#15
Things like dynamics, rhythm accents, and even the general groove of the song may not be “heard” by others.


what do you mean by "general groove"???

But sometimes when I say, “leave a little space after that G# note” they don’t know what I’m saying even though it seemed clear to me on the recording I gave them.


I think what your not getting is that things that make sense to you, may not make sense to other people. Like saying "leave a little space after...", your assuming that the person knows the amount of time to rest.


Quote by HoneyboyHart
It took me a while to realize that when someone listens to a piece of music they don’t necessarily hear the same things I do. I learned this fact when I gave bandmates a piece of music to learn by listening to it. They didn’t always hear the same details in the song. Things like dynamics, rhythm accents, and even the general groove of the song may not be “heard” by others.

This is no fault of theirs. Hearing the details in a song’s arrangement is a learning process. It takes time and hard listening until you get it.

Now this becomes problematic when I want someone to learn a new song or a new part. I usually hope that they can “hear” what I want them to play so that it won’t take as much rehearsal time to learn the song.

But sometimes when I say, “leave a little space after that G# note” they don’t know what I’m saying even though it seemed clear to me on the recording I gave them.

Inevitably I have to breakdown the song and go over the recording until they “get” what I’m talking about during a rehearsal session. That’s just the way it is… no big deal. That’s what rehearsing is all about anyways.

So how do you teach your bandmates a new song?


really, you couldn't have just started with that?
Last edited by ehbacon at Jul 17, 2013,
#16
I suppose it depends what your aim is. Even pros with millions of downloads and a roaring fan base rarely play exactly what is on the album at their shows. This of course, is my own subjective view on it, but I prefer to hear a band that is so well practiced that they can each play their own style creatively, on the fly and still make great music. When I say "well practiced", I mean they work well as a group, and understand EACHOTHER, not the sheet music they "should" be playing. I do not mean that they have every single note memorized, in time, and execute flawlessly. No. I am not talking about high school concert band competition, because I have been there as well, and that is how those bands are run - technical to the very 64th note or else. While I have respect for the level of discipline it takes to get there, it's not that fun to watch, and not that fun to play in that environment either (in my opinion). I pay to see a well rounded group of guys and girls who know their instrument well, and can communicate musically to each other dynamically, in real time. I say this from the standpoint of a musician, who is probably more critical of live bands than my non-musician friends. I don't think that the average show-goer is even listening on that level. From the standpoint of playing the bar scene, I think you can get by playing three chords and remembering most of the words. Every thing else is a bonus...drunks just don't seem to care that much.
#17
What I do is I write it all p in guitar pro apart from the vocal line and I export the thing as a midi file. Ye midi sounds crap but it lets you hear your song all together, I then play this to my band members and if they really need it I'll sing it along with them. Then If they think yeah let's go with that, I'll teach them riff by riff, I'll get on the drums myself and show them drummer the beats. Off course being a multi-instrumentalist makes it easier to teach the rest of the band the song but even then I always end up leaving it kind of bare so I tell them "if you've got something that fits and sounds good with it, throw it in and when we run throught it we'll see how it sounds" and I especially say this to the drummer because you don't know when they can add in awesome fills or half-time sections.

Ultimately breaking it down and showing them the parts bit by bit is the best way to teach the band the song and if you can provide them with a copy of the music for their instrument that is a big help.

This iw where programs such as Guitar Pro, Sibelius or the free website Noteflight come in very handy as they are made specifically for writing out your music on a score. Guitar Pro being the best for modern day rock/metal/indie etc. bands as its made especially for guitars and even has an easy to understand method of writing in Drums whereas Sibelius and Noteflight while providing the function to write for guitars is more suited for scores more along the lines of Piano and orchestral instruments.

teach each person say the intro, run through it a couple of times, then the next part, run through that a couple of times, then run through the intro and that part together a couple of times and so on, ye it'll take a while but thats what rehersing is for. I'd advise though that if you are like me and saying "feel free to add in little bits" I'd get them playing your version of what you have written down first. That way they have the grounding for it.
#18
Usually, it's collaborative effort when my bandmates and I write or learn music. We all pitch in ideas and shit that contributes to the rest of the group (as in playing a passage more legato or accenting stuff more). Honestly, I think we're all learning the others' instruments as well as we already know our own.
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#19
heres what i do, call upon their years of music education, and speak in what our vocalist likes to call 'musician gibberish' for 10-15 minutes, then go for a smoke, let it all sink in, come back and play.
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#20
It depends on what kind of environment it is. If it's a cover band, then ideally, everyone would be on the same page, and if someone isn't quite getting something, then just go over it and try to explain it in a way they might understand, then eventually they will get it, hopefully.

If it's a band playing original compositions, but someone comes in after a bunch of songs have been written by a majority of the members, or there is a definite band leader (e.g. solo artist with session players) then hopefully, the musician(s) would have either learned the song beforehand, or should be able to pick it up depending on how they go about it, or maybe even have an idea that the band hasn't thought of that makes it sound a lot better.

If it's an band playing original compositions and they are all creating a piece together, it should really be a kind of collaborative effort. Sure, one person might bring a certain thing to the table and have ideas on how they want things to fit around it, but they should be flexible in terms of interpretation, because in some cases, a guitarist might bring a piece, and the bassist will play something that sounds awesome underneath it, but the guitarist might dismiss it just because it wasn't what they had in mind, regardless of how it sounds in comparison.

Personally, if i am working with a band and have a song idea, i play the chord structure as a basic framework, and see what the other musicians come up with, and if we all agree that it all sounds good together, we keep it that way, and if not, we persist until we find something good, and if someone comes to me with something, i play it how they want it, and depending on how specific their instructions are, i ask if it's ok to play around with some interpretations of it and see what works best.
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