#1
Yo, guys. Fellow ex-guitarist here. I am OCD/anal retensive and a nail/skin biter on my fingers.

It got so bad, my fingers would bleed when playing the guitar and my fingers were so sore that they would be FAT and hard to fret on the 17+ frets on guitars.

I want to COME BACK to play guitar. I'm left handed and very artistic and really miss the ability to plug in and jam out.

Can anyone of you guys PLEASE help me find a guitar that might better suit my fingers, since some of them have callouses near the finger tip and are fatter than they were when I was a kid (I'm 26 now).

I've owned ESP M models, Jackson SL3, ESP MH1000 and Ibanez RG's. I 'd say, the Ibanez RG's felt really TINY and meant for skinny fingers so I Kind of hated that.

I had the Schecter Jeff loomis model, and the fret space felt pretty good on that.

Can anyone please help me? I listen to a lot of metal/rock (i.e. meshuggah to alice in chains to classical and shred, i.e. satriani, vai, loomis)
#2
All of those guitars have the same scale length, so any difference in spacing you felt must have been in your imagination, or could have felt different simply because of the angle you were playing the guitar at, etc..

25.5" is the standard scale, and longer scales are incredilby scarce in comparison.

Baritone guitars have a 27" scale - that's about the longest they get that's still relatively common. Some guitars come in 28" and 30" scales, but at that point the lower frets are so large that it can interfere with technique.

You can also get multiscale guitars, which have variable scales - low frets can be 25.5", while higher frets feel like 27". These are generally relatively expensive though.

Whatever your scale needs, Rondo Music is bound to carry something that fits your needs. The problem is t hat if you're not located in the US, shipping costs are very expensive.

If you are, take a look:

http://www.rondomusic.com/electricguitar.html


I would also like to add that while harsh, you may just need to practice. Big guys play on smaller scales with no problem. Look at Warren Hayes, just off the top of my head. He plays Les Pauls, which have 24.75" scales - shorter than what you had.
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#3
OK, so the scale then determines the amount of space or width of the fretboard?

The thing is, I am just paranoid because some of my fingers have callouses are got fatter because like I said, I am a nail biter.

Like I said, I quit and sold my gear about 1 year ago due to my paranoia and OCD; I felt like I ruined my fingers and it was over for me!

But I realized I can't give it up!
#4
No scale is the length of the nut to the bridge, I think Offworld miss under stood.

My epiphone G-400 has a pretty wide fret-board.
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#5
If you're talking about a guitar where the stings are farther apart than normal, I've never seen one, since that would mean having pick-ups that were spaced that way as well.

Maybe one of the gurus on here swill know of something.
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#6
Scale length isn't going to affect it really. What will affect how easy it is to play for you in this case is neck thickness and radius. all of those guitars have really flat radii on the fretboards so that may be why you're feeling squished. Typically, players with large fingers have felt most comfortable on guitars like Telecasters, that have thicker necks and a lower radius.
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#7
Quote by Robbgnarly
No scale is the length of the nut to the bridge, I think Offworld miss under stood.

My epiphone G-400 has a pretty wide fret-board.


I don't think I did, but maybe.

TS says "width", which is the wrong terminology (used to measure the fretboard from one edge to another, and has to do more with string spacing), but from his post I think he meant the actual space between frets, which scale length directly affects.
Spin 'round carousel when your horse isn't screwed in.

My band:
Fractured Instinct
(For fans of Death/Groove/Prog Metal)

Ibanez RGA42E
Ibanez S420
LTD H-301
Ibanez RG520
Peavey Predator USA
Douglas Grendel 725
Line 6 Pod HD500X
#8
It could be, I was thinking he was talking string spacing. If TS would have answered we'd actually know
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
#9
you definitely want a 25.5 scale, which is more or less length.

what you really need is a wide NUT WIDTH which is how wide the board is, not long. some guitars have skinny ass necks. for example i picked up a PRS mcarty the other day which both visually and to touch had a tiny ass heck in terns of width....not so much overall profile or thickness in the palm.

in short, look for wide nut width demensions
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#10
Vigilante Carlstroem of The Hives is a beefy guy with fairly large fingers, and he plays Epiphone Crestwoods and similarly normal guitars.
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#11
Quote by reflexez
OK, so the scale then determines the amount of space or width of the fretboard?


The scale determines the distances between the individual frets.
The *width* of the fretboard determines the distance between the strings.

Jim Soloway sent me a guitar with a neck that had a 1 13/16ths" nut width (I have huge XXL hands). Normally what happens with guitars that are wider at the nut is that they get to standard string width distances as they approach the 12th fret because the bridges are a stock width. But his guitar maintained that extra 1/8th" spacing all the way to the bridge (which was a custom item, BTW). It was amazingly comfortable. I'm pretty good at getting around narrow string spacing, but this was SO easy to play. As a side note, he makes guitars with a 27" scale (in addition to a 25.5" and even a 24.75") that are tuned to standard. These have incredible, piano-like sound, and acres of space for the fatfingered among us <G>.

You might contact him at Soloway Guitars (Jim is an outstanding jazz player as well). He's having Doug Kauer take over his building (for the most part) these days, as he's sort of retired from the guitar building business and moved to Vancouver. But I think he can still be persuaded to knock out a guitar or two if properly motivated. http://www.solowayguitars.com/
#13
If you need a guitar with an unusually wide fretboard, I'm afraid that you're going to have to go custom. Jay Leno's former guitarist Kevin Eubanks went with a custom maker specifically to get a ridiculously wide fretboard on a big, fat neck. Of course, Mr. Eubanks wasn't short of bucks for such a project. Custom guitars - particularly those with non-standard dimensions to the neck/fretboard, can be very expensive propositions. Even with most customs, the makers stick to standard dimensions and they have their jigs sized accordingly. It will cost you some serious coin, but you get what you pay for.

I don't recommend this practice, but a lot of guitarists, bassists and even a few drummers swear by it, so here it is: some players who experience excessive pain or bleeding from playing will coat their fingertips (and any callouses) with Super Glue before a performance. It forms an extremely hard shield between the fretboard, strings and your skin. It does work, but then there's the whole thing about having Super Glue coating your fingertips.

Of course, if you are a criminal in your spare time, some expert professional thieves coat the entire first digit of their fingers with the stuff. It makes leaving fingerprints impossible and confounds the hell out of the police.

Just saying, you know...
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