#1
hello friends,
i have a problem and i can´t find the solution for it so maybe you can help me.
There is this riff in my head and it is really simple!
the notes i play are :
F----F-E-D-C--C-D-E-D--C-B-C-A
Here you can listen to it:
https://soundcloud.com/aceseven5/riff

So its pretty simple but it sounds nice to my ear and i like the idea. However i wanted to take that idea some steps further and try to write a song for a solo fingerstyle piece.
I have done this steps :
-1: Determined the key : I would say the Key of the song is C. The riff does not start on C but it has the notes of the C major scale.

-2: Ive tried to add some chords ,matching to the melody and ive started with just playing the triads and thought of C triad , F triad 2nd inversion, and G triad 1st inversion. Just simple I-IV-V chord progression to start with.
My question is:

-How can i put this chords and the melody in a solo fingerstyle fingering where i can hear the melody clearly with the company of the chords or maybe just parts of these triads? and im not quite sure if that chord progression really supports the sound and feel i want the melody to have.

Can i hope my problem is clear to understand and possible to solve.
So can you please tell me my next steps .Thinking of simple melodies and riffs and creating fingerstyle tunes is my goal to achieve so i would also appreciate your help if you could tell me where my music theory lacks to achieve this.
I am able to navigate on the fingerboard,find every note i want,the matching build major,minor,dim and sus triads, inverting triads, add 7th, 9th ect. Also building 7th chords implie the root and so on.
There is obviously some knowledge missing otherwise i would know how to achieve what i want but i just have no idea what it is. I just can´t get the melody in company with the triad notes from the scale notes of the key (adding base notes, rhythm slapping ect.), to sound close to the melody on its own in a fingerstyle arrangement.
Please help!
#2
I think the key is actually A minor. It sounds the most resolved on the A note, and I think it has a minor tonality. Thus, Am.
Key is not determined by tallying up what notes you have and trying to fit them into a scale. Key is determined by resolution, and I believe it to be Am in this case. And no, they're not the same.
"I agree with Matthew about everything" - Everyone
#3
Quote by MattyBoy 1337
I think the key is actually A minor. It sounds the most resolved on the A note, and I think it has a minor tonality. Thus, Am.
Key is not determined by tallying up what notes you have and trying to fit them into a scale. Key is determined by resolution, and I believe it to be Am in this case. And no, they're not the same.


You are right! thank you.
#4
Quote by Acilan
hello friends,
i have a problem and i can´t find the solution for it so maybe you can help me.
There is this riff in my head and it is really simple!
the notes i play are :
F----F-E-D-C--C-D-E-D--C-B-C-A
Here you can listen to it:
https://soundcloud.com/aceseven5/riff

So its pretty simple but it sounds nice to my ear and i like the idea. However i wanted to take that idea some steps further and try to write a song for a solo fingerstyle piece.
I have done this steps :
-1: Determined the key : I would say the Key of the song is C. The riff does not start on C but it has the notes of the C major scale.

-2: Ive tried to add some chords ,matching to the melody and ive started with just playing the triads and thought of C triad , F triad 2nd inversion, and G triad 1st inversion. Just simple I-IV-V chord progression to start with.
My question is:

-How can i put this chords and the melody in a solo fingerstyle fingering where i can hear the melody clearly with the company of the chords or maybe just parts of these triads? and im not quite sure if that chord progression really supports the sound and feel i want the melody to have.

Can i hope my problem is clear to understand and possible to solve.
So can you please tell me my next steps .Thinking of simple melodies and riffs and creating fingerstyle tunes is my goal to achieve so i would also appreciate your help if you could tell me where my music theory lacks to achieve this.
I am able to navigate on the fingerboard,find every note i want,the matching build major,minor,dim and sus triads, inverting triads, add 7th, 9th ect. Also building 7th chords implie the root and so on.
There is obviously some knowledge missing otherwise i would know how to achieve what i want but i just have no idea what it is. I just can´t get the melody in company with the triad notes from the scale notes of the key (adding base notes, rhythm slapping ect.), to sound close to the melody on its own in a fingerstyle arrangement.
Please help!



Great question. In my opinion, you do this by considering your melody is going to be in the upper voices, and then start by perceiving the rhythm or beat in the melody.

You do this by accenting them within the harmonizing "chords". Now, understand the skills sets I teach make that easy for me or students of ours to do, and I don't know what your personal skill sets are, but let's assume you can do the same thing I can and know that your melody resolves to A, and with the notes in the melody and absence of a C# we decide this is in A minor.

In A an F is a b6 (b13) interval, so were I to play A C E F, I have a dissonant chord. I have to make a determination, do I play in that dissonance, or remove a non essential chord tone, such as E and then have A C F? That might be what I do, keep A in the bass, and C as my middle voice and F as my melody. If I do this, because of MY skill set, I see I'm not playing Am at all, but a first inversion F major. F/A

If I play the next F in your melody, because it is an offbeat I might just play it as a single note, followed by a half step back to your E note.

Depending upon what I want that D to be (the next note in your melody), I would construct my next chord. If I want it to be the 9th, I'd play a C E G D, making it a C add 9, and D is going to, once again be my upper voice in the chord.

This is one way that you could look at assembling your "ideas".

The skill sets I employed in constructing this example over the first few notes of your melody are: I know the notes on the neck, identification of all chord possibilities by knowing instantly the notes that make up every chord, an awareness of key and tonal center, simple diatonic harmony and the ability to instantly identify what one letter to another is, in musical interval language, (for example, F to Ab is a min 3rd)

One thing also to consider, is the flow of your bass line. A to a C might be preceded by a B bass note by itself or maybe simultaneously over the E note before the D. So your bass would go: A B C - smooth!

Hope this helps gets you started on what you'd want to look at. There are lots of things you can do, that are beyond that; this is just the basics. Good luck!

Best,

Sean
#5
Quote by Sean0913
Great question. In my opinion, you do this by considering your melody is going to be in the upper voices, and then start by perceiving the rhythm or beat in the melody.

You do this by accenting them within the harmonizing "chords". Now, understand the skills sets I teach make that easy for me or students of ours to do, and I don't know what your personal skill sets are, but let's assume you can do the same thing I can and know that your melody resolves to A, and with the notes in the melody and absence of a C# we decide this is in A minor.

In A an F is a b6 (b13) interval, so were I to play A C E F, I have a dissonant chord. I have to make a determination, do I play in that dissonance, or remove a non essential chord tone, such as E and then have A C F? That might be what I do, keep A in the bass, and C as my middle voice and F as my melody. If I do this, because of MY skill set, I see I'm not playing Am at all, but a first inversion F major. F/A

If I play the next F in your melody, because it is an offbeat I might just play it as a single note, followed by a half step back to your E note.

Depending upon what I want that D to be (the next note in your melody), I would construct my next chord. If I want it to be the 9th, I'd play a C E G D, making it a C add 9, and D is going to, once again be my upper voice in the chord.

This is one way that you could look at assembling your "ideas".

The skill sets I employed in constructing this example over the first few notes of your melody are: I know the notes on the neck, identification of all chord possibilities by knowing instantly the notes that make up every chord, an awareness of key and tonal center, simple diatonic harmony and the ability to instantly identify what one letter to another is, in musical interval language, (for example, F to Ab is a min 3rd)

One thing also to consider, is the flow of your bass line. A to a C might be preceded by a B bass note by itself or maybe simultaneously over the E note before the D. So your bass would go: A B C - smooth!

Hope this helps gets you started on what you'd want to look at. There are lots of things you can do, that are beyond that; this is just the basics. Good luck!

Best,
Sean


Thank you alot sean, i took my time in the past days and learned alot more about identifying the key and the chord options,harmony concepts and coloring the chords and conntected how to use this knowledge for creating very basic and simple tunes out of my ideas.
I think that i can follow and understand your steps now, so basically you build triads ( that work by knowing what note is to another)out of the scale notes and pay attention to having a nice and smooth moving bass line and the melody notes are the highest notes in the triad. Thinking in snapshots F/A and the Cadd9 have nothing to do with the Am aeolian scale but thinking in context or lets call motion picture instead of snapshots, we could see the connection right?