#2
what does the headstock look like?
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
#4

I meant the front where we can see any kind of identifying mark/name. Or is there no markings on the guitar at all (besides on the plate)?
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
#5
oh sorry ha - no nothing that I saw. I didn't buy it, so they wouldn't let me open up the guts and look for anything...
Attachments:
331_3.jpg
#6
I found nothing on the web maybe someone else?
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
#7
cool thanks for looking! I couldnt find anything on the web either.
#8
I'd be willing to bet that "Guitar Man U.S.A." is the name of the company that made that cover plate, and not the guitar. Whatever brand it is, it looks great. Somebody seems to have put some serious time and effort into that thing.
"Maybe this world is another planet's hell?" - Aldous Huxley
#9
@ fatal yeah I think you are right. I'm a pretty noob guitarist - but it looks like it has a neck through design. seems like there were some MIJ guitars under different brands that did that in the 70s and 80s. or it could be a kit guitar?

why do you say someone put time and effort into it?
#10
Quote by kcroy
@ fatal yeah I think you are right. I'm a pretty noob guitarist - but it looks like it has a neck through design. seems like there were some MIJ guitars under different brands that did that in the 70s and 80s. or it could be a kit guitar?

why do you say someone put time and effort into it?


You certainly aren't likely to find a guitar "kit" that results in a multi-piece neck-through-the-body guitar. That takes some work and skill. The only thing that might suggest a "kit" is the fact that the instrument - particularly the headstock - is devoid of any identigying maker's markings. But more than a few small custom builders do that, too. The neck looks great, the finish appears to be even and very professionally done, the fittings are not cheap, and there is nothing in the pictures that suggests "low quality." That thing looks like it was turned out by a small-scale maker with some serious talent.

Neck-through SLOs ("Strat-Like Objects") are not at all common. Carvin does a similar neck-through for some of their SLOs, and a few Japanese companies did do them in the late 70's and early 80's but usually on their high-end instruments only. They also put markings on the instrument so that you knew exactly who made it.

If it plays as good as it looks, then I think that it would make a good addition to anyone's guitar arsenal.
"Maybe this world is another planet's hell?" - Aldous Huxley
#11
thanks, appreciate that input. Is it possible to "wear off" the makers mark (deliberately) without damaging the finish?like does the mark go on TOP of the finish? was wondering if maybe it was an "off brand" and some guy who wanted he parents to get him a Fender might have removed it somehow - I've seen people do that with the "squier" part of a fender logo before.

thanks again for your insight!
#12
im not really a strat guy but that is a very nice looking guitar. i cant help you with who made it but i can tell you that who ever did from the pics it looks like they did a great job... if it plays good, sounds good and you like it hell i would say get it.
#13
Quote by kcroy
thanks, appreciate that input. Is it possible to "wear off" the makers mark (deliberately) without damaging the finish?like does the mark go on TOP of the finish? was wondering if maybe it was an "off brand" and some guy who wanted he parents to get him a Fender might have removed it somehow - I've seen people do that with the "squier" part of a fender logo before.

thanks again for your insight!


Yes, you can certainly "wear off" a maker's decal logo. There are plenty of Gibson Les Pauls where the script "Les Paul Model" decal has worn away completely. Now, this usually takes a great deal of time, and the rest of the guitar will show similar signs of wear, so I don't think that is what happened here. Some people build beautiful instruments and just don't put any markings on them. I think that is what you have there.

This is not confined to guitar makers. The greatest of Japan's sword makers, Masamune, rarely signed his blades. Leonardo Da Vinci never signed his paintings. Instead, he used small, cryptic marks.

Ideally, the maker or factory puts a decal logo on after the first couple of finish coats, and then puts clear coat over it. This is because most decals are no different from the water soluble decals that come with plastic model aeroplanes. They stick better to a hard, flat surface than they do to a slightly porous surface (like bare wood).
"Maybe this world is another planet's hell?" - Aldous Huxley
Last edited by FatalGear41 at Jul 19, 2013,