#1
I'm just wondering if there is a difference between the frets on electric guitars and the ones on accoustic guitars?

Why I'm asking is because I noticed on my first accoustic guitar, a really crap one, the cheapest you can find bought in Lidl, that the strings weren't gliding as smooth against the frets as on electric guitars. When bending the strings you can clearly feel a resistance, that the strings are actually scratching against the frets. So first I thought that it's obviously because of the cheap brand. But I just recieved my first quality guitar, a Fender CF 140SCE, and I experience the same thing.

So is this normal on accoustics?
#2
i haven't had that issue. no burrs on your frets? action has been set properly to your liking? Fender does ship them with an obscenely high height.
i don't want you to take this as slamming your purchase , i mean no disrespect.... the Fender cf140sce is at the very bottom end of where a quality guitar starts. i haven't played one in a while, i'm shopping tomorrow so, i'll make a point of trying one out if i can find one.
need more gear and a lot more talent(courtesytuxs)
#3
Quote by stepchildusmc
i haven't had that issue. no burrs on your frets? action has been set properly to your liking? Fender does ship them with an obscenely high height.
i don't want you to take this as slamming your purchase , i mean no disrespect.... the Fender cf140sce is at the very bottom end of where a quality guitar starts. i haven't played one in a while, i'm shopping tomorrow so, i'll make a point of trying one out if i can find one.


It's cool man, I actually wanted to add that I'm aware of where this Fender stands on the quality scale. Of course it's nothing to brag about, but still 5 times the price of my first Lidl guitar. So I was expecting the fret issue to be gone at least.

Well, the guitar is set up alright, action is pretty low, no fret buzz or anything. The only thing is the frets, no smooth bending on this guitar either. It'd be great if you could take a look at this specific guitar and share your views, cheers man.

I'll probably head down to the local music store as well and see how a quality accoustic feels like. Although as you mentioned it's far from a top quality guitar, it's still weird to me that they build them with these faults. I have the cheapest Epiphone electric you can find and I never had an issue like this on that one. That's why I thought maybe it's an accoustic thing.
#4
You can have the frets "dressed" (smoothed) with a burnishing tool at a shop...Shouldn't cost much...But the strings have to be off of course.
Next time you change strings, see how much to have it done.
#5
You'll tend to find that all low end guitars have similar issues out of the box, doesn't matter if its a £49.99 special from Lidl or a £200 Fender, they're all generally of the same quality when it comes to post production setup.

This means that the intonation is probably out, the action is crap, the relief on the neck isn't set properly, the frets aren't dressed to a high standard. This stuff takes time and racks up the price.

If the frets don't feel sharp when you run your hand over the side of the neck, and you don't have any dead spots on the neck, then you can remedy the poor feel yourself with some masking tape on the neck and some wire wool on the frets themselves.
#6
Best way to polish the frets is with some jeweler's rouge on a soft cloth. It's a polishing compound that will put a super smooth surface finish on the frets.

You might check the height of the frets... it should be around .040"... that's what my Strat had, and what my acoustic also has... and with strings of similar tension, and a similar set up, they play about the same.
#7
i tried 2 yesterday. one off the wall and it played fairly well, then i had the saleskid get another from the back that hadn't seen sunlight since it left China.... action was horrible, burrs on the frets, the truss rod hadn't been touched yet( full relief on truss rods when shipping) leaving a decent bow on the upper neck. just a turd before being set up.
the stupid thing was that the saleskid asked if i wanted the "virgin" one now ! kid didn't have a clue ! i don't think i'll ever walk into a GC again.
need more gear and a lot more talent(courtesytuxs)
#8
Quote by MetalMullet
ItI'll probably head down to the local music store as well and see how a quality accoustic feels like. Although as you mentioned it's far from a top quality guitar, it's still weird to me that they build them with these faults. I have the cheapest Epiphone electric you can find and I never had an issue like this on that one. That's why I thought maybe it's an accoustic thing.
Your Epiphone probably has medium jumbo frets, which have rounded crowns. Most acoustic guitar frets are more square across the top. So yeah, it'll feel different. Besides, most Gibsons have rounded top frets, and Fender electrics, (if memory serves), are a bit more square.

I didn't have much luck with a image search for neck closeups to compare. But, if you do go down to the music shop, take a few minutes to compare frets on different types of guitars. The differences may be subtle with a passing glance, but a couple of thousandths here or there, or a little rounder across the crown, can make a big difference in playability.

BTW, it's just not as easy to bend those Fender stock acoustic string sets as it is electric lights anyway.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jul 21, 2013,
#9
Well, the bending and the feel of the frets isn't an issue. It makes sense though, they ARE a bit more square than the frets on my electric guitar now that you mention it. The problem is that they are not smooth. When you bend the strings, it feels like the frets were tiny files because of the burrs. You can clearly here the scratching sounds as well.

Anyway, as you folks mentioned, it's probably a setup issue. I try to cope with it for the moment and the next time I change the strings I try to file them. Thanks for all the inputs! Especially Stepchild, thank you for taking your time to actually try these Fender bastards out.
#10
NP Mulletboy, I had time to kill in Albany anyway and a few hours in a guitar shop ain't so bad.
it was a good learning experience for me as well. taught me to Never go into a GC again.
'ol Steppy's a boyscout when it comes to helpin'
need more gear and a lot more talent(courtesytuxs)
#11
Quote by MetalMullet
Well, the bending and the feel of the frets isn't an issue. It makes sense though, they ARE a bit more square than the frets on my electric guitar now that you mention it. The problem is that they are not smooth. When you bend the strings, it feels like the frets were tiny files because of the burrs. You can clearly here the scratching sounds as well.

Anyway, as you folks mentioned, it's probably a setup issue. I try to cope with it for the moment and the next time I change the strings I try to file them.
If you do decide to have at your frets, keep in mind some of the following:

1. Run a pass of masking tape across the fretboard, as close as possible to the fret on each side to avoid damaging the board.

2. Silicon carbide "wet or dry" sandpaper in 800, 1200, or 2000 grits, are ideal for taking burrs off the frets.

3. Happich, "Simichrome" polish, will work about as well as jeweler's rouge for a final polishing.

4. The coarser standard automotive "rubbing compound", may be enough to clean up the frets, without sanding.

5. Always refer back to suggestion 1!

Quote by stepchildusmc
'ol Steppy's a boyscout when it comes to helpin'
I think you're being modest. I'd vote for at least an Eagle Scout.
#12
Quote by Captaincranky
If you do decide to have at your frets, keep in mind some of the following:

1. Run a pass of masking tape across the fretboard, as close as possible to the fret on each side to avoid damaging the board.

2. Silicon carbide "wet or dry" sandpaper in 800, 1200, or 2000 grits, are ideal for taking burrs off the frets.

3. Happich, "Simichrome" polish, will work about as well as jeweler's rouge for a final polishing.

4. The coarser standard automotive "rubbing compound", may be enough to clean up the frets, without sanding.

5. Always refer back to suggestion 1!


Cheers man! That's about all info I needed. Always thought that I would need some kind of a special file to fix up the frets. I think I might even be able to find all of those stuff at home.