#1
I've been improvising for a while....basically i want to know how do i find all the good
chords played in a good way for example in F#min/A major scale, and every other scale.
Also vice versa: how can you say when you hear a rhythm section "i'm gonna play that scale"
#2
Quote by vedranivanusi
I've been improvising for a while....basically i want to know how do i find all the good
chords played in a good way for example in F#min/A major scale, and every other scale.
Also vice versa: how can you say when you hear a rhythm section "i'm gonna play that scale"


Start by learning Diatonic harmony. Learn how to correctly spell out a major scale, and then learn each chord type for each degree of that scale. Look up Harmonized major scales, and start there. You have a ways to go before you can just do what you're asking about. But that's the starting point...diatonic harmony.

Best,

Sean
#3
Quote by Sean0913
Start by learning Diatonic harmony. Learn how to correctly spell out a major scale, and then learn each chord type for each degree of that scale. Look up Harmonized major scales, and start there. You have a ways to go before you can just do what you're asking about. But that's the starting point...diatonic harmony.

Best,

Sean



Thanks for the answer...but can you please explain a bit more ( i'm a music theory newbie ), what do you mean by each degree of the scale ?
#4
Quote by vedranivanusi
I've been improvising for a while....basically i want to know how do i find all the good
chords played in a good way for example in F#min/A major scale, and every other scale.
Also vice versa: how can you say when you hear a rhythm section "i'm gonna play that scale"


Your long-term goal is for it not to be an academic decision: "Oh, these are the chords, ergo I play this" but rather a musical one "THe music sounds like THIS, so I want to play something that sounds like THAT."

This requires that you develop your ear, in part because once you get beyond very basic music, a lot of what is interesting is the unexpected - the minor third when a major third was "right," the raised sixth, etc.

So start with your ear: transcription and the functional ear trainer. Ten get a good basic book on theory. Be warned: theory is MUCH easier than ear training, but you can't make good music by theory alone. It MUST flow from your ear.

(Be careful, however: a lot of people say they "play by ear" when they really mean they "play by finger" - they move their fingers around in a scale shape, and if it sounds okay, they are happy. Playing by ear means having control over your instrument such that you always know what sound it is going to make before it makes it.)
#5
Quote by vedranivanusi
Thanks for the answer...but can you please explain a bit more ( i'm a music theory newbie ), what do you mean by each degree of the scale ?

First you need to know the 12 notes of the musical alphabet, and recognise them on a staff/stave. Ascending using sharps, and descending using flats.

Then you need to know what the smallest interval is, and the largest interval is in music.
#6
Quote by vedranivanusi
Thanks for the answer...but can you please explain a bit more ( i'm a music theory newbie ), what do you mean by each degree of the scale ?



Well, are you looking for someone to teach you, or are you just wanting me to define what a degree is?

Every note of a scale is called a degree. so C D E F G A B C is a C Major scale.

The respective in that C major (or any notes that make up a scale) are known as degrees. Each degree has a certain type of chord that can be built from it, which use only the notes in that scale to build it.

That's what you need to learn.

Best,

Sean
#7
Ok i get major scales...if you have a I-V-IV-I progression in C maj, i.e C-F-G-C, but what are the rules about combining those chords in C major scale? Can you combine them anyway you want to as long as they end up in tonic ?
#9
Quote by vedranivanusi
Ok i get major scales...if you have a I-V-IV-I progression in C maj, i.e C-F-G-C, but what are the rules about combining those chords in C major scale? Can you combine them anyway you want to as long as they end up in tonic ?


Nope. I V IV I in C major is C G F C.

What do you mean by combine anyway? Like play at the same time? Or in a progression?

If it's a progression, you can play any chords you want. There are no rules to the making of music.
"I agree with Matthew about everything" - Everyone
#10
http://www.musictheory.net/lessons/57

This is probably what you are looking for but I would recommend that you first back up & study the earlier lessons on this website. Just remember to take this info with the thought that it's more like guidelines than hard fast rules. There are no rules to putting chords together for a song but generally you want you're progression to flow in the pattern tonic - predominant - dominant - tonic. Because that is a kind of natural progression, but as you know with music sometimes you don't want a "natural" sounding progression.
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