#2
Hi,

I use cubase SX and always sequenced the drums using the VST instrument that comes along with cubase (LM7 or something like that). To be honest, it works, but is not that great - you need to have good sequencing/programming skills and/or save up a default set of drum patterns and fills. There must be a better way, using loops, etc, but I dont know how to do that.

Latterly I've gone to recording real drums, with a drummer, but then again, I've got the facilities for that now (still using cubase SX though).

For the bass side, I just play bass myself. If you are already a guitarist, then its not too much extra effort to also knock something out on bass. Or team up with someone you know who plays bass.

Cheers
#3
I use Ableton's built-in multi-mic drum kits, and record bass myself with a bass. If for some reason I can't/don't want to use my bass, I will use Rhodes keyboard samples for a bassline.
Telecaster - SG - Jaguar
Princeton Reverb, Extra Reverb
P-Bass - Mustang Bass
Apogee Duet 2 - Ableton Suite
#5
I use Logic Pro 9.

Mostly, the built in drum samples and sampled bass.
Abbey road '60s drummer when I need something a bit more natural sounding.
Name's Luca.

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#8
Quote by xkovacsx09
Superior Drummer is good for that. heard good things about Steven Slate, too.


I got the basic Steven Slate kit when it was on sale a while back, and now I swear by it.

And yes, I do all my own backing tracks. I play bass as well as guitar and just program the drums in SS.
#9
For my last cover video, I started with a template I use, with Drumkit From Hell (not recommended over Steven Slate, by the way) and Miroslav Philharmonik, each set up across multiple outputs with some basic EQing and compression. There's also a bass track that's routed into clean and distorted channels; the cleans are tightly compressed and mixed into the lower end, and the other track is overdriven with TSE BOD v2 and all the lows cut out, for some extra clang.

The great thing about setting up a template like that is that you can just export the drums and keys from Guitar Pro (once you've downloaded/written a tab), and drag them into the project. Once that was done, I recorded the "bass" with my guitar (neck pickup/octave pedal), and did the guitars direct from my POD and synced it with the video later. Mix, master, done.

It's just like recording a demo, only the music is already written.

(You'll notice I didn't say what DAW I use, because honestly, that doesn't matter.)
Last edited by Cavalcade at Jul 23, 2013,
#10
Quote by Cavalcade
(You'll notice I didn't say what DAW I use, because honestly, that doesn't matter.)

Obviously you used Dr Drum, otherwise it would sound like ass
#12
wow cavalcade your cover is so awesome xDD

Damn I'm so new to this things, they sound to difficult
#13
Thanks!

If you break my setup down piece by piece, it's not as overwhelming, and a lot of the stuff in it, I stole from other people. Like the bass thing; someone mentioned that in the Recording Chat thread over here, I think. Everything has its own EQ, but once you learn about frequency ranges and have some experience with what they do, that just becomes another step in the recording process.

You'll figure it out eventually. There are some great videos at The Recording Revolution to help you get started; you might have to do some searching, because they cover a lot of different skill levels.
#14
Quote by Cavalcade
Oh god, is this going to become a thing in Recording?

I really hope it does, I feel new users should be let in on the secrets of producing the best music possible
#15
Quote by Cavalcade
Thanks!

If you break my setup down piece by piece, it's not as overwhelming, and a lot of the stuff in it, I stole from other people. Like the bass thing; someone mentioned that in the Recording Chat thread over here, I think. Everything has its own EQ, but once you learn about frequency ranges and have some experience with what they do, that just becomes another step in the recording process.

You'll figure it out eventually. There are some great videos at The Recording Revolution to help you get started; you might have to do some searching, because they cover a lot of different skill levels.

Oh thanks!

Gonna start reading and learning!