#1
In most every Kiss song there's one chord that pops up, and when another band uses it I know the guitar player is a Kiss fan, but I don't know the correct chord name, I just call it the Kiss chord (or Khord... Ok, maybe not)

E -------
B --8--6
G --7--5
D --9--7

etc. It's usually played alternating between

B --7-8
G --7-7
D --7-9

It's played a lot in Kiss and 80's glam, just wondering what the correct name for it is instead "Kiss Chord in A" or whatever

Thanks!
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#2
Learn all the notes on the neck, and how to construct chords, and you'll never need to ask a question like this again.

The first chord is a G major triad first inversion
The second is an F major first inversion
The third is a D major second inversion (you can think of it as an A shaped D major bar chord without the D in the bass).
The fourth is the same as the first, G major first inversion.
Last edited by macashmack at Jul 20, 2013,
#3
Allow me to demonstrate a little magic trick to you.

This is the open position C major chord which most guitar players are familiar with:

e|-----|
B|--1--|
G|--0--|
D|--2--|
A|--3--|
E|-----|


Now check out what happens when I take out the lowest note of the chord.

e|-----|
B|--1--|
G|--0--|
D|--2--|
A|-----|
E|-----|


Same shape as the examples in the OP. It's a regular old first inversion major triad. You should probably look up inversions if you don't already know how that works.

Addendum, the idiom:

e|--------|
B|--2--3--|
G|--2--2--|
D|--2--4--|
A|--------|
E|--------|


Is a way of outlining a I - IV progression (In the key of A this case with chords outlined being A and D) which seems to be very idiomatic to rock bands like KISS (AC/DC use the same thing quite a bit) because it fits under the fingers on a guitar fretboard really nicely and the voice leading is better than just playing I and IV as block chords.
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Last edited by Nietsche at Jul 20, 2013,
#4
Yeah it's just an easy way to shift between two chords without having to move your hand, however it also gives you some interesting options as far as articulation goes as it allows you to bring hammer ons and pull offs into the mix.

Have a listen to Wont get Fooled again by the who and Jack and Diane by John cougar mellencamp.
Actually called Mark!

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#5
It's called a triad.

A lot of classic rock bands use these triads as well as powerchords.
Another band besides KISS that uses triads is Free.
Some bands are hardcore powerchorders like AC/DC.
And talking about triads, you also have these ''chords'' which are typical for the Van Halen style: 2 notes, mostly major or minor third, sometimes a fourth.
#6
These three note chords are very handy, I started getting heavily into them after copying Mark Knopfler for an extended time.

The best thing about them is that when you are playing 3 hr+ chords your hand doesn't get as tired from playing the traditional full barre chords.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#7
Quote by AlanHB
These three note chords are very handy, I started getting heavily into them after copying Mark Knopfler for an extended time.


copying mark knopfler is also very handy, TS

The best thing about them is that when you are playing 3 hr+ chords your hand doesn't get as tired from playing the traditional full barre chords.


plus in genres like jazz/reggae/ska where the orchestration can get fairly thick (as in, there's more than just guitar-drums-bass-vocals), it really lets the rest of the voices stand out while the guitar holds down the progression
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#8
its just a major triad in 1st inversion
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#9
These kind of chords were also used a lot by Hendrix and John Frusciante of the Red Hot Chili Peppers I think. They're really useful for adding to melody lines, especially when you are the only guitarist, since you can easily throw them in to help accentuate the rhythm.

While technically the first chord is a "G major first inversion," I think the overall tonality feels more like an Em7 (there's no root, as the E is implied on the 5th string, but play a standard G major and a standard Em7 and see which sounds closer to you...), but whatever you call it they're still useful chords.

I have a post on my blog that breaks down how chords are constructed from the major scale if you're interested in learning how to figure out chords yourself. It's aimed at learning alternate tunings, but the info is valid either way.

http://thedeviltunedthisguitar.blogspot.com/2013/07/chord-theory.html