#3
Different instruments have their own challenges. There are a few that are more difficult because of their nuance as well as lack of access. Harp is one that is really difficult to write for unless you have the ability to sit down with a harpist for a while, guitar is very difficult to make idiomatic to the instrument unless you have experience and, believe it or not, piano is also very hard to write well for. Of non-string instruments, the horn is one of the most challenging to write for. It would be a great instrument if anyone could figure out how to play it.

The two big ones for almost everyone are harp and guitar though. It'd be hard to find a composer that would be comfortable writing for either if they didn't have prior experience.
#4
composing for the organ is hard not in the sense that the music is hard to write, but in the sense that organs all have different configurations. So 2 Staff's of music could be played in completely different ways on different organs.
#5
Every instrument has it's own limitations.

Having a good ear is halfway, cause you can at least hear roughly what the ranges are of an instrument.

2nd is all the other stuff (position on guitar, holding a note for 30 secs with no inherent sustain or breath).

I think if you take everything to a simple melodic motive level, the guitar is probably hardest if you have no experience.

Hell I can play advanced guitar, and even have an easier time writing stuff for piano than guitar (on non virtuosic level that is).

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#6
Drums, I have a hard time writing for most percussion actually.

My teacher says I write very idiomatically for woodwind, especially clarinet, not sure why
#7
^I'm the same with violin for some reason. I have no idea how.

Quote by Doveri
composing for the organ is hard not in the sense that the music is hard to write, but in the sense that organs all have different configurations. So 2 Staff's of music could be played in completely different ways on different organs.

Yeah, organ is very hard in that sense, I forgot about that. Also people tend to write for organ as if it's a piano, which leads to problems.
#9
Organ is tough -- I've heard violin is a tall order as well. I know nothing about playing either.
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#10
Pedal Steel.

- Physically challenging with all the pedals and knee levers.
- It's very difficult to play it in a rhythmic context. Rhythm is usually starting point (at least for me) for coming up with melodies or riffs.
- Back to the pedals and levers........your fretboard is moving under your hands? Imagine if you press a lever on your piano and the whole order of the keys shuffle. Then you combine multple pedals/levers. You have to learn this instrument in 4-5 (or more) tunings.
- It's a very "modern" instrument as it's only been around for 50 years or so and during that time, it's evolved rapidly. Not a lot of direct influences to draw from. Not a lot of players and/or good teachers.
- While it sounds amazing in so many contexts, I've yet to hear anyone really make it sound great as a solo instrument.

So, in conclusion, I think it's fairly easy to make the pedal steel sound nice in a given chord progression, but the pedal steel has never been the source of a piece of music for me.
#11
I find brass quite hard to write for. A bit because I don't really like brass as an ensemble, but also because I don't know them very well.
I also find that their sounds just don't blend as well together as other ensembles. They all have sticky sounds