#1
Hello dear members of UG!! I've been playing electric guitar seriously for a while(though I'm still having trouble to play everyday but I'm trying my level best). Previously had to play without my amp almost all the time because others would get disturbed by the sound but now I set my amp's volume at 4/5 o'clock so now everyone is okay with that. But as most of the time I played electric guitar unplugged(around a year) since I bought it, now I can see unwanted string noise makes my playing very sloppy on high gain as I've started to play every time through amp. I'm still struggling to stop/reduce unwanted string noise. Learning to control the distorted/overdrive sound is really important to play clean and now it feels I've just started to learn to play this instrument. My effect processor has a noise gate but still my playing sounds awe full and obviously I've tried different settings on my effect processor to make sure that I am not using too much gain. So I saw some YouTube tutorials on muting unwanted string noise while playing. I've seen few people use hair band tied around the guitar neck. Is using this trick means cheating or is it harmful for a player's technique? Can anyone help me regarding dumping unwanted string noise with valuable suggestions and constructive comments?
#2
Learn to do it properly. You will thank yourself in the end.
Washburn MG-44(E)
Ibanez RG421 (Eb)
Art & Lutherie Electric Cutaway
Vox Valvetronix VT40
Vox AC4tv 1x10
Vox Original Wah-Wah Pedal V847-A
MXR '78 Custom Badass Distortion
#3
If it's for recording then it's fine, but I really wouldn't suggest using it for practice since you're basically covering up a part of your mistakes.

Oh, and about dumping unwanted string noise:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kIEnzboW0Hc


Also, not trying to be an asshole but there is a big sticky called "read this sticky (guide to all techniques)" which also covers the whole muting topic, even directing to the exact same video I just linked. Alot of people just tend to ignore those threads while a good 80% of the questions could be answered that way. So please, next time you have a question about anything technique-related, check that thread first, there's bound to be some good info on it there.
baab
Last edited by My Last Words at Jul 22, 2013,
#4
Why not just learn to do it properly? Then you don't have to worry about it regardless of the situation.
Washburn MG-44(E)
Ibanez RG421 (Eb)
Art & Lutherie Electric Cutaway
Vox Valvetronix VT40
Vox AC4tv 1x10
Vox Original Wah-Wah Pedal V847-A
MXR '78 Custom Badass Distortion
#5
Yeah work on your muting technique & I would suggest turning the gain down. You probably dont need as much distortion as you think you do
#6
I would strongly not recommend using hairbands (or any such improvised dampeners) for anything other than complex legato-based stuff like sweep-tapping, two-handed tapping or pure legato. If you're using a pick and thus have your right hand available in the pickups area, use that hand to mute whatever you can and don't resort to dampeners.

For sure I'm thankful I never did, and that was some 6 years ago when I was impatient. By forcing myself not to use hairbands and such, I improved my muting to the point where I'm pretty happy with it all these years later. If I would've given in and relied on dampeners, I doubt I would've bothered to get serious about the essentials of left- and right-hand muting.

Oh, and I never turned the gain down. I'd say it's actually counterproductive to use lower gain or a clean tone for muting development. The more you crank it up, the more clearer your mistakes will be, and the harder you'll be forced work towards honing your muting technique. Once you've mastered cleaning up your playing at high gain, everything else will be a breeze.
Last edited by DaFjory at Jul 22, 2013,
#7
Quote by DaFjory

Oh, and I never turned the gain down. I'd say it's actually counterproductive to use lower gain or a clean tone for muting development. The more you crank it up, the more clearer your mistakes will be, and the harder you'll be forced work towards honing your muting technique. Once you've mastered cleaning up your playing at high gain, everything else will be a breeze.


I agree, although sometimes it's good to play clean as well. Clean allows you to hear things that you wouldn't hear with distortion and vice versa.
baab
#8
Practice properly, use it for gigs/recordings.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

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#9
I've seen the lots of popular players doing this, but I've always thought to myself that muting can be done without a hairband. I guess it depends on what you get used to using, but I've never found the need for one myself.