#1
So I've been teaching myself the guitar and I just have a quick question. I've been playing a lot of No Use For A Name lately. They seem to do a lot of Rthym guitar playing the standard power chords and the lead will be playing 2 strings a lot higher on the guitar to give it a high pitch tone on top of that.. What is that called? And do you have any tips on how I can learn them? Like a chart or anything that will tell me what goes with what?

Sorry if this doesn't make sense, I'm trying to describe it my best. Haha

Thanks guys!
#2
Octaves! That's what it is called. Haha. Can if I have the power chord 5-5-3 on the low E, what would the octave of that be?
#3
I believe you're referring to what I call 'octaves' not sure what the official terminology is though.

For example here Guitar 1 plays an A5 power chord while underneath Guitar 2 hits the C# octave.

Gtr. 1
e|-------------------------|
B|-------------------------|
G|-------------------------|
D|-7--7--7--7--7--7--7--7--|
A|-7--7--7--7--7--7--7--7--|
E|-5--5--5--5--5--5--5--5--|

Gtr. 2
e|-9--9--9--9--9--9--9--9--|
B|-x--x--x--x--x--x--x--x--|
G|-6--6--6--6--6--6--6--6--|
D|-------------------------|
A|-------------------------|
E|-------------------------|

This is so that the overall sound is that of an A Major chord but the notes are split across two guitars. The trick is to work out which notes relate to others, which you can do by learning chords and the notes that make them up, as well as just with a little sonic experimentation.
#4
Quote by Gu1T@r_H3r0
I believe you're referring to what I call 'octaves' not sure what the official terminology is though.

For example here Guitar 1 plays an A5 power chord while underneath Guitar 2 hits the C# octave.

Gtr. 1
e|-------------------------|
B|-------------------------|
G|-------------------------|
D|-7--7--7--7--7--7--7--7--|
A|-7--7--7--7--7--7--7--7--|
E|-5--5--5--5--5--5--5--5--|

Gtr. 2
e|-9--9--9--9--9--9--9--9--|
B|-x--x--x--x--x--x--x--x--|
G|-6--6--6--6--6--6--6--6--|
D|-------------------------|
A|-------------------------|
E|-------------------------|

This is so that the overall sound is that of an A Major chord but the notes are split across two guitars. The trick is to work out which notes relate to others, which you can do by learning chords and the notes that make them up, as well as just with a little sonic experimentation.



That is exactly what I'm talking about!! Thanks man. I'm gonna look into that.
#5
Hey Bransof!

A lot of two-guitar rock bands use this technique to beef up the sound. The rhythm guitarist holds things down with power chords, while the lead guitarist plays a melody on top with octaves.

The reason to do this with octaves is that sometimes just a plain melody line can sound kind of thin with a lot of distortion. If you play that same melody using octave shapes, it just sounds thicker and better with distortion.

Hope that helps!